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Thread: Tin Snips

  1. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Chicago area
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    Quote Originally Posted by joemach View Post
    Thanks for all the input guys. In my original post I said I had Midwestern - should have said Midwest (seems to be popular here). Is there a way to sharpen or adjust them? seems like the 2 jaws are too far apart. I will have to look at them closer and see what can be done when it slows down a little. I don't use them often, but when I do I want them to work properly.

    Is there a time when you throw them out and start over or are they repairable?
    Just tighten the nut and bolt a bit, the one in the center that is the pivot. Too tight and they wont move easy, too loose and they wont cut.

    To sharpen, you need to take apart and sand on a wet stone or similar in progression from maybe 100 grit to 1500 or better. Takes real patience to acquire the skill and finesse to properly sharpen a blade.

    For many its easier to just buy another pair.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #15
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
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    When I was a kid I'd sharpen things like scissors. Only ever used a file. Think a wet stone would take forever.


    Quote Originally Posted by heatingman View Post
    Just tighten the nut and bolt a bit, the one in the center that is the pivot. Too tight and they wont move easy, too loose and they wont cut.

    To sharpen, you need to take apart and sand on a wet stone or similar in progression from maybe 100 grit to 1500 or better. Takes real patience to acquire the skill and finesse to properly sharpen a blade.

    For many its easier to just buy another pair.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Beatrice, NE
    Posts
    9,583
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    Here's a couple pictures of the Glenville next to a Wiss offset. While the jaws are similar there is quite a difference. The jaw on the Glenville is thinner and flatter, maybe not even as long. They were a good snip in their day.
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    State College, PA
    Posts
    2,727
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by heatingman View Post
    Just tighten the nut and bolt a bit, the one in the center that is the pivot. Too tight and they wont move easy, too loose and they wont cut.

    To sharpen, you need to take apart and sand on a wet stone or similar in progression from maybe 100 grit to 1500 or better. Takes real patience to acquire the skill and finesse to properly sharpen a blade.

    For many its easier to just buy another pair.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I think just getting a new pair would be better use of my time. Sort of like changing seals on the Appion Core Removal Tools. For the cost, I just replace them once a year or whenever I lose confidence in their ability to hold vacuum.

    Tin snips go 3-5 years before they don't work as well as new.
    Can someone please explain to me -
    Why is there never enough time to do it right the first time, but plenty of time to do it twice?


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