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  1. #1
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    Engine Hoist Capacities

    For those who are familiar with hoisting....

    I have not been able to find an answer to this online.

    What does the rating refer to on the hoist, the weight limit of the hydraulic ram, or the weight limit of the hoist structure?

    Obviously, the longer the arm extends, the lower the rating. For example, a 2-ton nominal rating decreases to 1.5 Ton, 1 Ton, 1/2 Ton as the arm extends.


    I have a compressor pull coming up next week. It requires an extension added to the hoist reach the compressor. This lowers the lifting capacity well below the weight of the compressor. Another tech thinks it would be fine as long as there is enough counterweight on back end to prevent tipping, I'm doubtful.

  2. #2
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    Might a gantry be better suited for the task ?
    Is there limited overhead clearance ?

  3. Likes heatingman, Metalman0880 liked this post
  4. #3
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    Dont hold me to it but it seems like most lifting devices are very much under rated so you would likely be fine. But if it is not high quality i wouldn't risk it. On the other hand if someone is paying to have a job done it should be done with proper tools if possible.

    Sent from my rotary telephone using Tapatalk

  5. #4
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    Might a gantry be better suited for the task ?
    Is there limited overhead clearance ?
    There is no overhead clearance for a gantry on this one, it would certainly be my rigging of choice if there were.

    This is a Trane 40HP Semi-CRHR in an old RAUCC80. A heavy girl, weighing in at 815 lbs.

    Our shop hoist is of decent quality, but only rated at 2 tons. An extension would severely derate it, I don't know how much safety factor they engineer on those things.
    My only concern would be lugging all this gear onto the roof and find that I won't take the load. Or worse yet, dumping the compressor!

    We may be able to rent a 3 or 4 ton hoist for the day, which I think would be the safest route.

    The shop hoist is the bosses personal rig, so I will have a hard time convincing him it's inadequate

  6. #5
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    So there's two if those in there ah ?
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  7. #6
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    Jan 2010
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    This condensing unit ?
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  8. #7
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    Jul 2011
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    DFW, TX.
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    Quote Originally Posted by FrostGiant View Post
    For those who are familiar with hoisting....

    I have not been able to find an answer to this online.

    What does the rating refer to on the hoist, the weight limit of the hydraulic ram, or the weight limit of the hoist structure?

    Obviously, the longer the arm extends, the lower the rating. For example, a 2-ton nominal rating decreases to 1.5 Ton, 1 Ton, 1/2 Ton as the arm extends.


    I have a compressor pull coming up next week. It requires an extension added to the hoist reach the compressor. This lowers the lifting capacity well below the weight of the compressor. Another tech thinks it would be fine as long as there is enough counterweight on back end to prevent tipping, I'm doubtful.
    Its the capacity of the structure as a whole in its lift capability. So yes extending the arm furthure lowers its capacity and ability to "stay grounded". Having said that. Get a big dude to act as a counter weight and make sure the rollers have a smooth path to roll and you'll be alright. Thats unless you have a cheapo lift. Acdelco here.

    Sent from my LG-G710 using Tapatalk

  9. #8
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    Thread Starter
    You got it. That photo of the condensing unit is a little hard to see, but basically the same setup. This is a 1989.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by FrostGiant View Post
    The shop hoist is the bosses personal rig, so I will have a hard time convincing him it's inadequate
    Sounds like the boss should demonstrate his prowess...

    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Chicago area
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    Safety margin is typically 200 percent of rating. So fully extended you might be okay with the as designed hoist.

    Add some jethro engineered extension and your not even in the ball park capacity wise.

    If you have the clearance for the hoist, then you have clearance for something more suited to the task.

    Such as this :
    http://complift.com/heavy-duty-3-complift/




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  12. #11
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by BALloyd View Post
    Sounds like the boss should demonstrate his prowess...

    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk
    We talked about doing a trial run first to see how it fares. He was looking around the shop for something that weighed 800 lbs.

    heatingman, we have the lighter version duty of the comp lift but there is no access to set it up.
    I'm going to start the prep work tomorrow recovering the refrigerant and disconnecting electrical, will take some more measurements
    and see what I'm truly up against.

  13. #12
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    Aug 2002
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    Southold, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by FrostGiant View Post
    For those who are familiar with hoisting....

    I have not been able to find an answer to this online.

    What does the rating refer to on the hoist, the weight limit of the hydraulic ram, or the weight limit of the hoist structure?

    Obviously, the longer the arm extends, the lower the rating. For example, a 2-ton nominal rating decreases to 1.5 Ton, 1 Ton, 1/2 Ton as the arm extends.


    I have a compressor pull coming up next week. It requires an extension added to the hoist reach the compressor. This lowers the lifting capacity well below the weight of the compressor. Another tech thinks it would be fine as long as there is enough counterweight on back end to prevent tipping, I'm doubtful.
    If you extend the arm its NOT rated and cant be used!

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    I'm wondering if pulling the top is a option ?

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