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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    indiana
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    sealing gaps in walk in fridge

    I was called for some wet electrical inside of a walk in cooler. I closed the door with the lights off and saw a gap at the seam in the box sections. I can access this from both sides. Is there a best sealant for application inside of the box? Im not sure if this will coninue to shift, so I wonder what would be best that would have some flexibility and set up and hold just above freezing? Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Southold, NY
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    If moisture is getting in the light fixtures seal from the outside of the conduit!

  3. #3
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    Jul 2000
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    Guayaquil, EC
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    For sealing the seams, use a good quality 100% Silicone RTV on the outside to prevent moisture from entering and condensing in the joint. You can then seal the inside with the same RTV but it will take longer to cure. The primary limitation is it must be above freezing.

    For conduits which penetrate the box, they must be sealed inside the conduit to prevent moisture from being drawn through it.

  4. #4
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    Oct 2011
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    Start by tightening the camlocks
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  5. #5
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    Nov 2010
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    indiana
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    Thread Starter
    Well, I was able to locate and seal a number of leaks with some low temp silicone. It appears though that warm air is migrating from the electrical box on top of the cold storage inside the conduit and condensation is accumulating on the wires at the terminal box inside the storage which Im trying to minimize. i got some putty from an electrician and jammed what I could inside the conduit next to the wires inside the box on top of the fridge. I wonder if there is anything better than that that would go next to the wires in the conduit or a fitting that would minimize airflow or redirect the moisture

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Southold, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by uffdanow00 View Post
    Well, I was able to locate and seal a number of leaks with some low temp silicone. It appears though that warm air is migrating from the electrical box on top of the cold storage inside the conduit and condensation is accumulating on the wires at the terminal box inside the storage which Im trying to minimize. i got some putty from an electrician and jammed what I could inside the conduit next to the wires inside the box on top of the fridge. I wonder if there is anything better than that that would go next to the wires in the conduit or a fitting that would minimize airflow or redirect the moisture
    That’s all you need!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
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    Maple Grove, MN
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    Quote Originally Posted by uffdanow00 View Post
    I wonder if there is anything better than that that would go next to the wires in the conduit or a fitting that would minimize airflow or redirect the moisture
    Sounds like you did good. If you think about it, there should really be weather tite junction boxes on the outside of the cooler/freezer and normal type on the inside, but the way everyone does it is backwards from this. I usually see weather tite boxes on the inside and normal ones on the outside.

    I often come across the same issue you had, with water dripping out of the on/off switches, light fixtures, etc. To fix the issue I often remove gaskets from the weather tite boxes and sometimes remove plugs/knockouts or drill small holes to give the moisture a way to get out, along with trying to plug up the conduit on the warm side like you did.
    If at First You Don't Succeed, Skydiving Is Not for You.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    upstate sc
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    We use a 3M product called Venture or cooler repair tape part number 1577CW-E to seal the seams when all the locks are closed best as possible. We make sure The cooler/freezer is shut down, thawed out and dry. Tape all the seams and it works great. The conduit has to be sealed inside the conduit as stated by another Tech.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Madison, WI
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    Since this thread popped up, I was approached yesterday by a guy with an aerosol sealant that he wants to try on walk-ins. Its similar concept to aerosol duct sealing products but they are doing it to full houses. Here's a video he shared with me. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=RFifVCE06Ik

    The process is basically you pressurize the building to 100 pascals, spray this stuff in, it finds the leaks and plugs them up and then you ventilate the place out to get rid of the excess. I already asked if it would work at low temp, if it was "Food grade" and a bunch of similar questions he couldn't answer. I'm just wondering if anyone here has seen this or tried this before.

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