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  1. #14
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    Sep 2005
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    Atlanta GA area
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    Looked at the weather report a few minutes ago...
    It appears the sustained winds from this hurricane are more from the North to the South... so your east/west windows are probably safe.

    If it were me... I would do the preventative stuff BEFORE the next storm...
    But I am an 'over-prepared' type... I do not like the feeling of: 'I wish I had...'
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *Cheap is not good, good is not cheap; however expensive is not a guarantee of quality!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    South Carolina
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidDeBord View Post


    .. If Hurricane force winds, say about 100 Mph, were heading your way, ... Why wouldn't You evacuate?
    Here are some of my reasons:
    When you leave your home during a hurricane its not always easy to get back in afterwards. A lot of times after the hurricane is over, the roads are blocked by the state troopers & they will not let anyone back in until they decide its safe enough. Sometimes the roads are just flooded & there is no way back until the water recedes. if you have any damage like a tree fallen through the roof or flooding then you want to be able to deal with it as soon as possible. Also there may be valuables that you would want to be able to move to a different place during the hurricane that you would need to be there to do so. You can't think of everything & when you are not there its too late if there is something you didn't think of. Then there's always the possibility of vandalism. It's sad to say but a lot of criminals plan on staying through hurricanes so they can have their pick of vacant homes to vandalize. Add to that, you never know how bad you will be hit by a hurricane until the last hour or so because the forecasts are constantly changing & they are never 100% accurate on where the hurricane will make landfall. I would just rather stay unless I am really fearful of bodily injury.
    Gary
    -----------
    http://www.oceanhvac.com
    The best things in life are free but not everyone is willing to pay the price.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    If you can get to them from the inside to open/close them - you can fit a close-fitting piece of 3/4" plywood to the inside of them. Attach it well with a dozen long screws and the window won't blow in.

    If it were me I would use a straight edge across the frame edges to measure the space there will be between the glass panes and the plywood when fitted in place. Then I would cut foam panels of that thickness (one for each pane of glass) and attach them to the window side of the 3/4" plywood panels. This to prevent the glass from distorting inward when wind pressure is being applied.

    PHM
    -------



    Quote Originally Posted by garyed View Post
    I've been through plenty of hurricanes here at the beach but there is one question I haven't found the answer for yet. I have a two story house so I always board up my windows but there are two sets of windows on the second story that are hard to get to so I don't bother boarding them up. One set is on the east side & the other set is on the west side. What I was wondering is if one side ever breaks during high winds if it would be wise to open the window on other side of the house. So my engineering question is: Would letting the wind blow all the way through the house create more danger of ripping the roof off or less than if the wind just blew into one side?
    We'd be staying downstairs either way.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  4. #17
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    Nov 2018
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    Galivants ferry SC
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  5. #18
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    Jul 2009
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    South Carolina
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by Lawrosa View Post
    Very interesting!
    Gary
    -----------
    http://www.oceanhvac.com
    The best things in life are free but not everyone is willing to pay the price.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    Won't forget this as long as I live. Back in the 60's Donna Roared through. My Dad, Mom, Sister, and I we're hunkered down in the hallway. The Garage Door blew in. My Dad ran towards the attached garage, the garage roof blew off before he made it. I think if he had opened the house door to the garage, he would've been killed. Luckily the Garage was added onto the house, so the house roof wasn't connected to the garage roof. BTW When the Eye passed and the wind hit the back of the house, the rain blew up the back wall, and ran down the inside wall. That house had Cathedral ceilings, except in the hallway, which was built like a bunker.
    Retired, after 43 Years

  7. #20
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    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by garyed View Post
    I've been through plenty of hurricanes here at the beach but there is one question I haven't found the answer for yet. I have a two story house so I always board up my windows but there are two sets of windows on the second story that are hard to get to so I don't bother boarding them up. One set is on the east side & the other set is on the west side. What I was wondering is if one side ever breaks during high winds if it would be wise to open the window on other side of the house. So my engineering question is: Would letting the wind blow all the way through the house create more danger of ripping the roof off or less than if the wind just blew into one side?
    We'd be staying downstairs either way.
    A roof often gets ripped off the back side as the high wind creates a low pressure area....any pressure increase inside the house will aid in blowing the roof off..so yes if it absolutely comes down to it.. open opposing windows..if a window breaks...it will destroy alitbof stuff inside due to wind and rain.. but staying alive is what matters.
    Also keep in mind that when you open an opposing in very high winds...items in the house will go to that window.
    Open very fast .. hit the carpet and crawl back to your hiding place



    Sent from LG Stylo 4 using Tapatalk
    ...

  8. #21
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    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by garyed View Post
    Here are some of my reasons:
    When you leave your home during a hurricane its not always easy to get back in afterwards. A lot of times after the hurricane is over, the roads are blocked by the state troopers & they will not let anyone back in until they decide its safe enough. Sometimes the roads are just flooded & there is no way back until the water recedes. if you have any damage like a tree fallen through the roof or flooding then you want to be able to deal with it as soon as possible. Also there may be valuables that you would want to be able to move to a different place during the hurricane that you would need to be there to do so. You can't think of everything & when you are not there its too late if there is something you didn't think of. Then there's always the possibility of vandalism. It's sad to say but a lot of criminals plan on staying through hurricanes so they can have their pick of vacant homes to vandalize. Add to that, you never know how bad you will be hit by a hurricane until the last hour or so because the forecasts are constantly changing & they are never 100% accurate on where the hurricane will make landfall. I would just rather stay unless I am really fearful of bodily injury.
    I know what you are saying as I have seen alot of damage from tornadoes.... different beast but still immobilizes the area.
    Its alot of work to take off....would be like taking off for a small vacation.. getting back in even with limited damage could still take time due to traffic lock right?



    Sent from LG Stylo 4 using Tapatalk
    ...

  9. #22
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    Feb 2004
    Location
    New Mexico
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    I remember when lots of homes had shutters. I wonder why that changed.
    I would close my house up because along with wind there is lots of rain.
    Water damage is expensive.
    I've seen barometric pressure changes flush toilets. With tornadoes, people were told to open windows to equalize pressures as homes can explode. I don't know if that applies to hurricanes. I'd want to keep the rain out.
    Give me a relay with big enough contacts, and I'll run the world!

    You can be anything you want......As long as you don't suck at it.

    If a person wants to create a machine that will be more likely to fail...Make it complicated.

    USAF 98 Bomb Wing 1960-66 SMW Lu49

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    One time I was in Fort Lauderdale with this beautiful little girl. There was a hurricane coming when we checked into the Riviera Hotel - right across the street from the wide beach - a second floor room. We spent some extended time settling in and then went downstairs to the restaurant for dinner. It was already windy and they had these heavy plastic curtains on the beach side - which were Really bulging in in the gusts. All during dinner the gusts got stronger and right afterwards the electric went out. So we felt our way back up to the room and after a bit were so tired that we slept even through the howling whining wind noise.

    In the morning it was worse and big waves were breaking in the front street - there was no beach. The bed was somewhat rumbled when we rolled out and the scene outside was so wild that I opened the front slider to the front balcony to get a better view. Just about at the same time she opened the back door to the pool area.

    And, quick as a Wink, everything on the bed was Gone! Sheets, blanket, pillows, Everything - gone! She was outside against the railing after having been blown right out the back door. I instantly realized what had happened, slammed the slider shut, and raced out to grab her back into the room.

    I got her back and closed the back door and we looked around in amazement. Half our stuff was missing, there was Nothing on the bed, it was just amazing! We later found her shoes way across on the far side of the pool by a wall. The power and force of that wind was just beyond my imagination.

    I have never seen a roof blow off or even a window blown in or out - but the idea that it can easily happen is Very vivid in my mind. <g>

    PHM
    ---------

    Quote Originally Posted by Missouri Guy View Post
    A roof often gets ripped off the back side as the high wind creates a low pressure area....any pressure increase inside the house will aid in blowing the roof off..so yes if it absolutely comes down to it.. open opposing windows..if a window breaks...it will destroy alitbof stuff inside due to wind and rain.. but staying alive is what matters.
    Also keep in mind that when you open an opposing in very high winds...items in the house will go to that window.
    Open very fast .. hit the carpet and crawl back to your hiding place



    Sent from LG Stylo 4 using Tapatalk
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  11. Likes lions_lair liked this post
  12. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    South Carolina
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    Thread Starter
    Well we were lucky that the bad part of the hurricane passed us by. We probably only got around 50 to 60 mph winds & a lot of rain. A lot of debris to clean up but not as much as I was expecting. I'm about 8 blocks from the ocean so it would pretty much take a tsunami for the tide to get to my house.
    Gary
    -----------
    http://www.oceanhvac.com
    The best things in life are free but not everyone is willing to pay the price.

  13. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    One time I was in Fort Lauderdale with this beautiful little girl. There was a hurricane coming when we checked into the Riviera Hotel - right across the street from the wide beach - a second floor room. We spent some extended time settling in and then went downstairs to the restaurant for dinner. It was already windy and they had these heavy plastic curtains on the beach side - which were Really bulging in in the gusts. All during dinner the gusts got stronger and right afterwards the electric went out. So we felt our way back up to the room and after a bit were so tired that we slept even through the howling whining wind noise.

    In the morning it was worse and big waves were breaking in the front street - there was no beach. The bed was somewhat rumbled when we rolled out and the scene outside was so wild that I opened the front slider to the front balcony to get a better view. Just about at the same time she opened the back door to the pool area.

    And, quick as a Wink, everything on the bed was Gone! Sheets, blanket, pillows, Everything - gone! She was outside against the railing after having been blown right out the back door. I instantly realized what had happened, slammed the slider shut, and raced out to grab her back into the room.

    I got her back and closed the back door and we looked around in amazement. Half our stuff was missing, there was Nothing on the bed, it was just amazing! We later found her shoes way across on the far side of the pool by a wall. The power and force of that wind was just beyond my imagination.

    I have never seen a roof blow off or even a window blown in or out - but the idea that it can easily happen is Very vivid in my mind. <g>

    PHM
    ---------
    If can be very powerful.. tornadoes often turns cars into toys and turn them over as well....a 'good' hurricane can probably do the same thing.
    When wind speed doubles the force quadruples....that's a pretty steep ramp.
    A 100 mph wind exerts over 800 pounds of pressure on an 8 by 4 of plywood....a 140 mph wind ..over 1600 pounds of pressure on an 8 by 4 of plywood..
    I have seen telephone poles break due to wind...the wind speed is anyone's guess



    Sent from LG Stylo 4 using Tapatalk
    ...

  14. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,296
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    Did you guys see the Doorbell Cam. showing what was probably a High end Mobile Home being lifted off its foundation by a Water Spout turned into a Tornado? The owners weren't home, said the home is a total loss.
    Retired, after 43 Years

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