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  1. #1
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    Taylor C713 beater motor not cutting on — is it the overload switch?

    Hello HVAC-Talk, first post here.

    I'm working on a Taylor C713 soft serve machine with an electrical issue. Wondering if anyone here might have the knowledge of common or advanced issues these machines face.

    The right beater motor fails to cut on under any mode. Tested firing the motor with manual control settings, nothing. I've tested both the starter capacitor and run capacitor, both are operational. This leads me to believe it's an issue with either the control board, or (more likely) the overload switch (Taylor 066794-27K). The beater motor did present symptoms of frequent overload leading up to total failure, so I wouldn't be surprised if the relay died after many years of operation. This is just my theory.

    Is there a quick method of testing the motor and switch without bypassing? I'd rather not waste time rewiring the board if I can find answers on this forum. Thanks.

    —Cal

  2. #2
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    I'm not a Taylor tech, but I can troubleshoot an electrical problem.

    You wrote a bunch of ambiguous statements there.
    • So you "test fired" the motor. In my forty years of troubleshooting electrical problems, I've never used that phrase without providing the numbers. Did you actually check the voltage to the motor?
    • You tested the capacitors and they're both operational. So how did you test them to know that?
    • You said the beater motor had symptoms of frequent overload, then it totally failed. So what test equipment did you use to determine that the motor isn't the culprit? Sounds like it might be seized or has another issue causing that protective device to do its job.
    • THEN...you don't want to rewire the board. Why would you actually even want to do that? Just operate the unit to engage the motor and test for voltage to it.
    • Your THEORY is that the relay died due to its age. I'll give you that one since I've used it...if the relay can't be tested due to some reason like it being integral to a board. Otherwise, you should actually troubleshoot it with a meter to FACTUALLY determine that it might be the problem.


    Here's a service manual...just because I found one. I downloaded it from https://www.manualslib.com/. Taylor is generally very protective of their technical literature...and aren't very accommodating to offering tech support to those who aren't factory trained (which I'm not EITHER):
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by ECtofix; 08-24-2019 at 08:21 PM.
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  3. #3
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    Thread Starter
    So you "test fired" the motor. In my forty years of troubleshooting electrical problems, I've never used that phrase without providing the numbers. Did you actually check the voltage to the motor?
    I mean I entered the service menu on the machine, selected MANUAL CONTROL, selected the right beater motor, and pressed ON to ensure it isn't a software issue.

    You tested the capacitors and they're both operational. So how did you test them to know that?
    I used a multimeter to measure the resistance, and watched it slowly climb to infinity.

    You said the beater motor had symptoms of frequent overload, then it totally failed. So what test equipment did you use to determine that the motor isn't the culprit? Sounds like it might be seized or has another issue causing that protective device to do its job.
    I have yet to test the motor leads with a meter, but I simply spun it by hand to determine that it at least isn't seized.

    THEN...you don't want to rewire the board. Why would you actually even want to do that? Just operate the unit to engage the motor and test for voltage to it.
    Perhaps I used poor phrasing... By this I meant pulling the motor cable and/or the relay, swapping parts around, testing if the motor works when connected to the left side relay. That was going to be my go-to.

    Your THEORY is that the relay died due to its age. I'll give you that one since I've used it...if the relay can't be tested due to some reason like it being integral to a board. Otherwise, you should actually troubleshoot it with a meter to FACTUALLY determine that it might be the problem.
    The relay is not integral to the board, in fact it loosens with just a couple screws.

    I'm not an electrician nor EE so I'm not super adept at reading electrical diagrams. I'm unsure which leads to test/which to leave connected to the computer. Again, my go-to was to just pull the suspect relay and swap it with a known functional one (the left side) since to me it would be just as simple as testing the relay with a meter.

    I'm not a trained professional, but I grew up in a toolbox and consider myself mechanically/electrically inclined and I'm good with Google (which is how I got my job doing odd repair for a mid-sized company). So forgive me if I sound dense. I'm trying to learn as much as I can as I go. I've gone home for the day so I figured in the meantime I'd post here hoping someone with Taylor experience has ever seen a similar issue. Looking for troubleshooting shortcuts, basically. I will take a crack at testing the leads on the relay and the motor after the weekend and see what I come up with. If I have any trouble I'll update the thread.

    Thanks for that manual link, by the way. I already found a copy on my own, but I appreciate the help. Did you find it on a Google search or is there a resource with more manuals? I've been trying to find a service for the watercooled C713 since we have those too but I've had no luck. Not expecting much as I realize Taylor would rather slit their own throats than share these.

    Anyways, thanks for the response. Truly appreciated.

    —Cal

  4. #4
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    Okay, so you have a motor that's not working.

    Capacitors tested in ohms? Why on earth?

    Caps are measured in micro or nano fahrads. They essentially kickstart a single phase motor by creating a shift phaze in the magnetic field that allows it to begin spinning. Simple terms, the start cap kick starts it.

    Before you do any damage, just stop and let's walk through it, you are making mistakes or doing thins incorrectly which is not good and believe me, you can break a lot of things that way.

    What's the motor voltage? 120V?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olivero View Post
    Capacitors tested in ohms? Why on earth?
    That's an old "fly-by-the-seat-of-your-pants" test method done with analog meters that was used before a capacitor test mode was incorporated into our modern digital meters. All it does is prove that the capacitor still charges and discharges. That method is absolutely useless for anything else, though. It won't determine whether a cap is still performing within specs.
    ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° °

    "You never know what others don't know." -

    If I can't laugh at myself...then I'll laugh at YOU! -

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ECtofix View Post
    That's an old "fly-by-the-seat-of-your-pants" test method done with analog meters that was used before a capacitor test mode was incorporated into our modern digital meters. All it does is prove that the capacitor still charges and discharges. That method is absolutely useless for anything else, though. It won't determine whether a cap is still performing within specs.
    Wow, never even heard of that.

  7. #7
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    Hi,


    I'm assuming this is a single phase machine?

  8. #8
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    I'm used to working on the C602, 708, 606 etc but I'm sure the C713 is the same principle.

    When you open the rear cover you should have two contractors. One for the compressor, one for the beater motor. When you go into service menu, manual mode and run the beater motor does the contactor pull in?

    If it does, do you get all three phases (if three phase) passing through the contactor, through the overload and out to the motor? I've had the contactors fail on me before and the contacts don't close

    If so it's a bad motor and needs replaced, if the contactor doesnt close then are you getting coil voltage?

    I fail to understand how you tested the cap. Isnt the cap on this model mounter and build into the beater motor?


    Is there any other messages on screen. Remember the beater motor wont run (in any mode) if the door is not detected through the door switch mounted behind chassis close to the top left stud but it normally says door off when this happens

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