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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Orange County, in a Galaxy far far away...
    Posts
    283
    Post Likes
    Well...

    I am that HVAC heretic that left the air side and went to the dark side.
    Been almost a year and the transition is really rough the first 6 months, especially the on call...
    If you are the kind of tech to take notes, pictures and write up service calls in a journal then... Refrigeration isnt too bad. Im really starting to like the flexibility of hours, constant work load and consistent OT.
    Im also spoiled in that I live 25 mins from the farthest store I service, 3 mins to the closest one. No longer spending 4-6 hours in shitty SoCal traffic.

    I feel like Ive learned A LOT on the controls side with boards, points, ROs Sensors offsets etc. Mechanically its been getting better the last few months, just lots and lots of reading and research after the work day ends.

    I use my multi meter on almost every service call, I use my stubby gauges on almost 90% of calls, I check airflow, cfms and %RH almost daily since humidity wrecks case efficiency.

    I feel like I was a decent mechanic before and refrigeration is really going to take me to another level skills wise. 👍
    You cannot cheat an honest man. But that doesn't stop people trying!

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Cape Coral / Helsinki
    Posts
    4
    Post Likes
    I apologise, but, in my opinion, a qualified HVAC technician is a technician who installs, maintains, and repairs heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration systems that control the temperature and air quality. That's why it's not difficult to learn the refrigeration trade for a competent HVAC tech

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Dubai, UAE
    Posts
    21
    Post Likes
    As you are an HVAC technician it will be easy for you to learn about refrigeration.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    104
    Post Likes
    close enough...

    Different TXV's, Different Juice, Different TD's, Different SH, Different Controls....

    That said, it's still the same refrigeration cycle and theory... ,you should be able to work on either.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Flat Rock, MI
    Posts
    9
    Post Likes
    I agree that it is easier for a refrigeration technician to work on air conditioning.

    For whatever reason our industry has separated refrigeration from comfort cooling.

    If you understand how a refrigeration system works and take temperature readings (superheat and subcooling) you should be able to work on light commercial equipment with no problem


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Hibbing, MN
    Posts
    769
    Post Likes
    Although comfort cooling and commercial refrigeration have basic similarities, refrigeration problems have $$$$$ of product sitting on your shoulders.

    One time, we started a job installing 16 frozen food doors in a grocery store. Started the job at 7am. About 6pm, we brought the new equipment online. Everything seemed to be working fine, so I sent the other guys home and I stayed to button up a few things. Around 8pm, EVERY low temp case and walk-in quit working. Long story short, at 7am the next morning, I was able to go home.

    Also, if you’re thinking refrigeration, get really good at electrical troubleshooting. I’d say 90% of my day is either electrical or dirt. The other 10%, I pull out my gauges.
    If God didn't want us to eat animals... He wouldn't have made them out of MEAT.

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