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  1. #1
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    Silly question...

    I know that whenever I break into an hvac system to do a repair or replace a component, I need to replace the filter dryer. But what if that filter dryer is in the condenser like many manufacturers do (like Goodman and Lennox) to name a few.

    So if I pump down the system to replace an indoor TXV, do I need to recover the gas to replace the filter dryer? Assuming there is no temp split across the dryer. That could be pretty costly to the customer on some of these larger R-22 systems.

    Thoughts? Comments?
    Last edited by joemach; 08-21-2019 at 06:55 PM.
    Can someone please explain to me -
    Why is there never enough time to do it right the first time, but plenty of time to do it twice?


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  2. #2
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    I wouldnt think so. You havent contaminated the system. Be nice to know how the system was installed originally. That drier could be F'd.


    Let me change my answer. Change it, lol.

  3. #3
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    Good practice is to change it. On the other hand, if it wasn't plugged before, you follow proper brazing practices eliminating contaminants, I think you'll be ok. Now if it looked like a hack threw it together, I'd just change it. If the unit was flat, I'll change it.

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by BennyD View Post
    Good practice is to change it. On the other hand, if it wasn't plugged before, you follow proper brazing practices eliminating contaminants, I think you'll be ok. Now if it looked like a hack threw it together, I'd just change it. If the unit was flat, I'll change it.

    Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk
    Thanks. Good advice.

    Of course if the system is flat it would get a new filter dryer. This system is not. I always use nitro and pull way below 500 microns.

    Here is my concern...

    If I pump the system down, all the refrigerant is in the condenser. In order to replace the filter dryer I would need to recover the refrigerant. I never trust what may be in a used recovery tank unless it is new. If someone put acidic refer in there some time in the past, I could potentially contaminate the system, even if I pull a good vacuum on the tank. So now I have to recover the refrigerant and charge the customer for 8 lbs of R-22. I am trying to avoid that.

    So that is where I am at and why I ask. If this was R-410a, it would be a non issue.

    Maybe, what I need to do is buy my own recovery tank for situations like this so that I have some degree of certainty that the tank is not contaminated an I can just recover and pump back into the system.

    Hope this better explains my situation.
    Can someone please explain to me -
    Why is there never enough time to do it right the first time, but plenty of time to do it twice?


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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by joemach View Post
    Thanks. Good advice.

    Of course if the system is flat it would get a new filter dryer. This system is not. I always use nitro and pull way below 500 microns.

    Here is my concern...

    If I pump the system down, all the refrigerant is in the condenser. In order to replace the filter dryer I would need to recover the refrigerant. I never trust what may be in a used recovery tank unless it is new. If someone put acidic refer in there some time in the past, I could potentially contaminate the system, even if I pull a good vacuum on the tank. So now I have to recover the refrigerant and charge the customer for 8 lbs of R-22. I am trying to avoid that.

    So that is where I am at and why I ask. If this was R-410a, it would be a non issue.

    Maybe, what I need to do is buy my own recovery tank for situations like this so that I have some degree of certainty that the tank is not contaminated an I can just recover and pump back into the system.

    Hope this better explains my situation.
    I carry my own recovery tanks. If the refer is questionable, I take it in for an exchange. I don't trust anything out of the shop either.

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  6. #6
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by BennyD View Post
    I carry my own recovery tanks. If the refer is questionable, I take it in for an exchange. I don't trust anything out of the shop either.

    Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk
    I hear ya.
    Can someone please explain to me -
    Why is there never enough time to do it right the first time, but plenty of time to do it twice?


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  7. #7
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    I have never replaced the dryer in the condenser when I pump it down to work outside of the condenser. Not only do i think it is a waste of time & money, there is probably more chance of harming the system by opening up the condenser & replacing the dryer than there is by leaving it alone. If I already suspected the dryer was contaminated or stopped up that would be different & then I wouldn't be pumping the unit down.
    Gary
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    The best things in life are free but not everyone is willing to pay the price.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by garyed View Post
    I have never replaced the dryer in the condenser when I pump it down to work outside of the condenser. Not only do i think it is a waste of time & money, there is probably more chance of harming the system by opening up the condenser & replacing the dryer than there is by leaving it alone. If I already suspected the dryer was contaminated or stopped up that would be different & then I wouldn't be pumping the unit down.
    Thanks Gary,

    Those are my thoughts exactly. In my demented mind, I was thinking that as long as I could run the system enough to see if there was a temperature difference between the in & out of the dryer, it should be OK. Since I did not open the condenser side of the system and it remained sealed with refrigerant, I did not see a reason to dump the gas and replace the dryer.

    Now if there was a temperature difference on the dryer, of course I would want to replace that.
    Can someone please explain to me -
    Why is there never enough time to do it right the first time, but plenty of time to do it twice?


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  9. #9
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    In my opinion, if you were to do a compressor or condenser coil (you can't pump down and you're forced to recover), it is good practice to completely removed the filter drier from inside the condenser, grab two 3/8" couplings, straight pipe where the old filter drier was, and then install a new filter drier on the lineset side of the service valves - - IE in the future a technician could change out the filter drier when doing a coil or a TXV.

    In your case, most people wouldn't change out the filter drier unless you're a 150% over achiever. Even though it's good practice to change out a filter drier whenever a technician uses torches, I would assume more technicians would let it slide versus create another 20 minutes worth of work.

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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by FreeThrowGuy View Post
    In my opinion, if you were to do a compressor or condenser coil (you can't pump down and you're forced to recover), it is good practice to completely removed the filter drier from inside the condenser, grab two 3/8" couplings, straight pipe where the old filter drier was, and then install a new filter drier on the lineset side of the service valves - - IE in the future a technician could change out the filter drier when doing a coil or a TXV.

    In your case, most people wouldn't change out the filter drier unless you're a 150% over achiever. Even though it's good practice to change out a filter drier whenever a technician uses torches, I would assume more technicians would let it slide versus create another 20 minutes worth of work.

    Sent from my LM-G710VM using Tapatalk
    Not trying to save work or a few bucks on a filter dryer.

    What I am trying to accomplish is saving a homeowner from having to pay for an extra 8 pounds of R-22.

    And yes, if I did replace the filter dryer, I would replace with straight pipe and install it at the air handler where it belongs.
    Can someone please explain to me -
    Why is there never enough time to do it right the first time, but plenty of time to do it twice?


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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by joemach View Post
    I know that whenever I break into an hvac system to do a repair or replace a component, I need to replace the filter dryer. But what if that filter dryer is in the condenser like many manufacturers do (like Goodman and Lennox) to name a few.

    So if I pump down the system to replace an indoor TXV, do I need to recover the gas to replace the filter dryer? Assuming there is no temp split across the dryer. That could be pretty costly to the customer on some of these larger R-22 systems.

    Thoughts? Comments?
    It's likely fine. I add a 16 cu in. Drier outside the unit. Those little driers are not much capacity. It does not hurt before all the naysayers cry about pressure drop.

  12. #12
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    It's a really interesting blog!thanks for sharing this information with us!!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by joemach View Post
    I know that whenever I break into an hvac system to do a repair or replace a component, I need to replace the filter dryer. But what if that filter dryer is in the condenser like many manufacturers do (like Goodman and Lennox) to name a few.

    So if I pump down the system to replace an indoor TXV, do I need to recover the gas to replace the filter dryer? Assuming there is no temp split across the dryer. That could be pretty costly to the customer on some of these larger R-22 systems.

    Thoughts? Comments?
    On my part:

    Yes, recover the gas.

    Yes, remove the Filter drier in the Condenser, & replace it, or fill the void with new pipe, & relocate the "New Filter Drier".

    As far as the Customer?

    Tell them that by not leaving the original Filter Drier in place, & installing a New One, that You are employing recommended work practices, that will give their equipment a longer life.

    Besides that, .... You will make a little more $$$.
    Hos 4:6 My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge. Because you have rejected knowledge, I will also reject you, that you may be no priest to me. Because you have forgotten your God’s law, I will also forget your children.


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    Mat_15:24 But he answered, “I wasn’t sent to anyone but the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”

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