Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Overseas work

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Flagstaff, az
    Posts
    2
    Post Likes

    Overseas work

    Just curious in learning more about doing HVAC work overseas. Does anyone have any resources like top sites to search, or any current or previous experience working overseas as a US citizen?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    546
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by aarona3184 View Post
    Just curious in learning more about doing HVAC work overseas. Does anyone have any resources like top sites to search, or any current or previous experience working overseas as a US citizen?
    Hello aarona3184: Yes, i think can steer you in the right direction. But, before we go there, please finish filling in your about me page. Let me ask you this right up front, Do you have a criminal record? Do You have a valid passport? Do you have a clean bill of health? Are you a Vet? Overseas Jobs are abundant, but be careful what you wish for, as you just may land one.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    30,961
    Post Likes
    The amount of yearly income can look very attractive for overseas work. I have researched the actual requirements and to my surprise, I found that most of their hires are not Americans. So... you work with people who speak a limited amount of English which makes your job very difficult.

    Secondly, none of the US labor laws apply in overseas locations, so what you end up with is working 7 days a week for several weeks and then you get like a week or two weeks off.... but those days you work are 12 hour days. There is no overtime....there is no taking breaks....there is no "I want a day off." None of that stuff works the way it does in the United States. You're expected to grind it out for the entire term of your contract, which is why they're always looking for people....because very frequently after the first year of overseas work, most people do not decide to go in for year number two.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist
    Member, IAEI

    AOP Forum Rules:







  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    546
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    The amount of yearly income can look very attractive for overseas work. I have researched the actual requirements and to my surprise, I found that most of their hires are not Americans. So... you work with people who speak a limited amount of English which makes your job very difficult.

    Secondly, none of the US labor laws apply in overseas locations, so what you end up with is working 7 days a week for several weeks and then you get like a week or two weeks off.... but those days you work are 12 hour days. There is no overtime....there is no taking breaks....there is no "I want a day off." None of that stuff works the way it does in the United States. You're expected to grind it out for the entire term of your contract, which is why they're always looking for people....because very frequently after the first year of overseas work, most people do not decide to go in for year number two.
    You Never Cease to Amaze Me T-B, LMAO!!!. Quick question for You, "Have "YOU" "Ever Actually Worked Overseas"? I await you response. LOL.
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    30,961
    Post Likes
    No. I have spoken directly with people who have done it, and I talked with several defense contractor recruiters.

    I take it you are still drinking?
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist
    Member, IAEI

    AOP Forum Rules:







  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    kansas
    Posts
    1,409
    Post Likes
    I’m sure that thread that covered overseas work died in the great crash. There was one contractor website that basically stated if you want 8-5 m-f ,and to see the world this isn’t for you. Everyone will hate you they want your job, your pay, your bunk, etc. If your not willing to kill the guy next to you to get what he has don’t bother applying, or something very similar to that.
    Honeywell you can buy better but you cant pay more

    I told my wife when i die to sell my fishing stuff for what its worth not what i told her i paid for it

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    30,961
    Post Likes
    One of the big support contractors used by the DOD was a company called Kellogg, Brown, and Root ...which was then shortened to KBR. My conversation with that fella was very enlightening.

    KBR made headlines about 15 years ago because of what are known as the "dancing boy" allegations. Apparently, the Afghanis are a pretty perverted bunch, and they like to get their entertainment from young boys. I'm not kidding...this is not a smear or a joke. There is a word that Afghans use to desribe this practice which escapes me, and nobody likes to talk about it very much, but somehow KBR got tangled up in an allegation involving a boy that was dancing for some tribal leaders.... and somehow it found its way into American newspapers.... and there was a big to-do about it.

    When I started hearing about stuff like that, and the long hours and the working conditions, and the lack of protection that I would experience, it pretty much turned me off from the whole idea of using this as a method where someone above the age of 37 could support the work that his country was doing around the world.

    I found that the people that they were hiring were generally disreputable types, and I didn't want to be identified with that reputation, and I was saddened to see that the Department of Defense was allowing these type of shenanigans to go on.

    So now I send money every month to the Wounded Warrior Project instead.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist
    Member, IAEI

    AOP Forum Rules:







  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    546
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    One of the big support contractors used by the DOD was a company called Kellogg, Brown, and Root ...which was then shortened to KBR. My conversation with that fella was very enlightening.

    KBR made headlines about 15 years ago because of what are known as the "dancing boy" allegations. Apparently, the Afghanis are a pretty perverted bunch, and they like to get their entertainment from young boys. I'm not kidding...this is not a smear or a joke. There is a word that Afghans use to desribe this practice which escapes me, and nobody likes to talk about it very much, but somehow KBR got tangled up in an allegation involving a boy that was dancing for some tribal leaders.... and somehow it found its way into American newspapers.... and there was a big to-do about it.

    When I started hearing about stuff like that, and the long hours and the working conditions, and the lack of protection that I would experience, it pretty much turned me off from the whole idea of using this as a method where someone above the age of 37 could support the work that his country was doing around the world.

    I found that the people that they were hiring were generally disreputable types, and I didn't want to be identified with that reputation, and I was saddened to see that the Department of Defense was allowing these type of shenanigans to go on.

    So now I send money every month to the Wounded Warrior Project instead.
    Love your long winded i heard from a guy, who heard from a guy, war stories T-B. You sure you did not get them from your "Young Boys Life" Magazine Subscription? Just do us a favor in the future, and begin your stories with "Once Upon a Time", and end them with "No Sh!t" The Department of Defence, was one of my Employers when I was Traveling, and i did not see, Nor did i ever Hear of any of "Your Young Boy Stories", until now? What branch of the service were you in T-B, "The Salvation Army"? DEAR OP: If you choose to believe T-Bs working abroad in a turkish prison war story, or want to know the real deal from one who actually worked abroad for 5 years (on and off), made lots of $, Ment lots of Great People, Made Many World Wide HVAC/R Contacts, and Loved it, is up to you.This petty tit for tat childish insecure behavior is how this site was when i first joined it 10 years ago, with the same players, like Timebuilder Then it got better, but now, well sorry you have to see this again. PS, Get yourself a Woman T-B, then Get More Help.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    up in the hizzy
    Posts
    3,274
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by lzenglish View Post
    the real deal from one who actually worked abroad for 5 years (on and off), made lots of $, Ment lots of Great People, Made Many World Wide HVAC/R Contacts, and Loved it, [/FONT][/SIZE][/COLOR]
    Did you kill the guy next to you to get what he had???
    There is not better place for the working men than the union! 100% UA the only HVAC union!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    30,961
    Post Likes
    Apparently, the poster in this thread did not work abroad for a defense contractor.

    If you want to go and work for a company in a foreign country under typical labor situations, that can be terrific. That is rare.

    Most people from the US who "work abroad" are working for defense contractors under the conditions which I have accurately described.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist
    Member, IAEI

    AOP Forum Rules:







  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    up in the hizzy
    Posts
    3,274
    Post Likes
    The dancing boy is real and coming to an air conditioner near you!
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    There is not better place for the working men than the union! 100% UA the only HVAC union!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Austin Texas
    Posts
    1,979
    Post Likes
    I looked into working overseas about 10 or 12 years ago. I looked into it and it didn't look like it was worth it.
    Nemo me impune lacessit.

    How much blood do I have to bathe in to get clean?

    Don't look down on anyone unless you're helping them up.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    1,369
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by aarona3184 View Post
    Just curious in learning more about doing HVAC work overseas. Does anyone have any resources like top sites to search, or any current or previous experience working overseas as a US citizen?
    Overseas is a very broad description. It's going to be different depending on the company worked for and the local codes/laws.

    When I moved from Oz to Canada, I had to recertify my qualifications to work in regulated trades. It is the same if someone was to go the other way. I'd imagine it's similar for most developed countries.

    I think some of the mining and oil sectors are setup a little different for international workers. Best bet there would be talking with an international company and have a job and paperwork in place. But going this route someone negates the point of working overseas, might as well just be stuck on any FIFO site in North America.

    If only a trip for a year or two, working under somebody else as a Trades Assistant would be easier.

    I guess it comes down to what you hope to achieve working overseas?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •