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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    17,333
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    Where there's a will there's a way....

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Vancouver, B.C.
    Posts
    615
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    I like it when customers present problems like this because they are always happy and surprised when they see it working again. Who said it can’t be fixed? Have you gotten a second (or third) opinion? What exactly makes it unfixable? Often times things look worse than they actually are. I find it’s not very often things become so broke they can be fixed at all, it’s usually just more reliable to replace than repair. In this case it sounds like replace isn’t really an option at all but retrofit may be a solution. I would scrape together as much as you can find for this repair and have a good conversation with a creative tech about how you can make it work. If you don’t put enough money into it then you may end up with a photo on the wall of shame (and to be honest it sounds like that would be acceptable to you at this point of desperation), but if it works then it’s still a great success. 26 years is getting old but there are some buildings that I maintain that has much older equipment and it’s still going strong. I would suggest you don’t take it out back to shoot it without first talking to a few more technicians from various companies. Not everyone will be able to see the answer to the problem so finding the right tech will be part of your problem. They are out there though.


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  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Posts
    4
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    Thread Starter
    Thanks.

    Forgive my lack of understanding, I'm not an HVAC tech, just a placeholder property manager at a theatre that works out of a 130-year old building.

    The "waste heat" coming each of the A/C units would be pushed right back into the HVAC units return (a 2'x3' intake) immediately beside the unit. I was thinking that the waste heat would enter the return, cycle through, and would be at least room temperature by the time it is in the ducts going back out to the offices.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Posts
    4
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    Thread Starter
    Thanks

    Have had opinions from 4 technicians over 3 companies, and another from a consultant in an engineering firm. There are 2 confirmed, and maybe more leaks on the refrigerant lines. all the techs stated that any attempt at repair the leaks had a good chance of making them worse. The unit is in an incredibly tight space, that was pretty much walled up around it. The techs and the consultant all recommended replacement.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Posts
    4
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by BALloyd View Post
    Do you own the building???? If not...are you leasing???

    If you are leasing, who is responsible for building capital equipment costs according to your lease agreement????



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    Thanks

    Leasing.

    We have a below-market lease. We get the property for a very affordable price, but are on the hook for most all repairs and all upkeep. Currently landlord has no interest in remedying this issue, as it is in our contract for the tenant (us) to perform the upkeep of the system.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    1,581
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    Thank you for additional information. You stated all vendors recommended replacement but you did not say if they provided a repair opition. They're just bounding their work with known replacement work. Repairs are many time crapshoots as you just don't know all that could be wrong. It's easier to pull out the old and replace with new. I woulld call sevral others and those whom you have already talked to tell them you are interested in repair not replacement. While I do not know what your contact says, you state you are responsible for upkeep, that typically means cleaning, filters, seasonal tune up, some refrigerant, maybe some other misc repairs. But upkeep is different than replacement due to, wear out, obsolence or damage. No one will pay to sit in a hot theater to watch a movie, which means your client is loosing revenue. How long before they fail to make rent payment. Which means the building owner is now loosing revenue. This probably also means you loose income for your part in this operation. There should be discussion with tennet and owner of a potential shared repair/replacement cost. Get some additional (repair) quotes add them to your replacement quotes and call a meeting (you buy the lunch). If a deal is not worked out I doubt you remain in business.

    Good Luck

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  8. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Sea to Sky
    Posts
    3,376
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    It is common for the leaseholder to be responsible for maintenance the unit. It is uncommon for the tenant to be responsible for replacing equipment past its service life, but this all depends on your lease agreement.

    At 26 years old and after having paid for several independent opinions, I believe your landlord should be bucking up for a new system.
    Quote Originally Posted by CanStage View Post
    Thanks

    Leasing.

    We have a below-market lease. We get the property for a very affordable price, but are on the hook for most all repairs and all upkeep. Currently landlord has no interest in remedying this issue, as it is in our contract for the tenant (us) to perform the upkeep of the system.
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