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  1. #1
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    Jul 2019
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    Sealing a leaky RITCHIE 69073

    Hi all, new user here. I read this site often with many excellent posts. Today I registered and hopefully get some good advise from

    After plugging it directly into a vacuum pump with a ball valve and pulled down to 22 micron, it would rise up again. Even though I carefully waited and turned the ball valve 45 degree for a while before carefully shut it down. The pump was still running. I was following this youtube video (watch?v=zc0Ojz79qTo)

    I also cleaned it up with 99% alcohol several times according to an instruction from youtube by yellow jacket.

    (watch?v=0RSRMqIuvC4)

    So now I think the sensor is leaky. I am thinking of sealing it. Since it's not readily to be disassembled, some choices come to my mind:

    1. Seal from the outside, such as epoxy, or some kind of oil tolerant glue that can handle heavy duty use

    2. Try to pry open the various metal tab and see if there is an oring inside that can be replaced.

    #2 would work well, but higher risk. #1 may work well if I can find a glue that works, and it's a big if.

    What would you advise or suggest (spend $70 is another option, but throwing it away seems to be a bit wasteful if there is an good solution).

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
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    What you are witnessing is normal.

    Get a recovery cylinder and put your vacuum pump on one fitting, and your vacuum gauge on the other.

    For what it is worth, the first time I did that, the recovery cylinder had a leak. So I saw the same results.


    Quote Originally Posted by namng View Post
    Hi all, new user here. I read this site often with many excellent posts. Today I registered and hopefully get some good advise from

    After plugging it directly into a vacuum pump with a ball valve and pulled down to 22 micron, it would rise up again. Even though I carefully waited and turned the ball valve 45 degree for a while before carefully shut it down. The pump was still running. I was following this youtube video (watch?v=zc0Ojz79qTo)

    I also cleaned it up with 99% alcohol several times according to an instruction from youtube by yellow jacket.

    (watch?v=0RSRMqIuvC4)

    So now I think the sensor is leaky. I am thinking of sealing it. Since it's not readily to be disassembled, some choices come to my mind:

    1. Seal from the outside, such as epoxy, or some kind of oil tolerant glue that can handle heavy duty use

    2. Try to pry open the various metal tab and see if there is an oring inside that can be replaced.

    #2 would work well, but higher risk. #1 may work well if I can find a glue that works, and it's a big if.

    What would you advise or suggest (spend $70 is another option, but throwing it away seems to be a bit wasteful if there is an good solution).
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
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    Thread Starter
    I was able to get it down to a leak rate of 2 to 4 microns/second when the ball valve was closed. That's a lot compared to some videos I saw on the tube. But I can probably live with that by shutting down the ball valve, doing evacuation, turn the valve on and the gauge on once a while to check. I still have to deal with hose leaks and all kind of other things. Probably a good way would be to buy off the shelf vacuum rated hoses. I think it would not be too bad to fabricate 3/8 copper hoses for vacuuming purposes. That would connect both high and low side to the vacuum. The gauge set is completely out of the equation, other than a hose is connected behind a ball valve for nitrogen or adding charge.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
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    Get your post count up and apply for Pro Membership.

    There's a thread or two on here that will blow your mind.

    Regarding how to get lower micron levels during an evac, that is. Not to mention all of the other valuable info.


    Quote Originally Posted by namng View Post
    I was able to get it down to a leak rate of 2 to 4 microns/second when the ball valve was closed. That's a lot compared to some videos I saw on the tube. But I can probably live with that by shutting down the ball valve, doing evacuation, turn the valve on and the gauge on once a while to check. I still have to deal with hose leaks and all kind of other things. Probably a good way would be to buy off the shelf vacuum rated hoses. I think it would not be too bad to fabricate 3/8 copper hoses for vacuuming purposes. That would connect both high and low side to the vacuum. The gauge set is completely out of the equation, other than a hose is connected behind a ball valve for nitrogen or adding charge.
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

  5. Likes vin lashon liked this post
  6. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by namng View Post
    I was able to get it down to a leak rate of 2 to 4 microns/second when the ball valve was closed. That's a lot compared to some videos I saw on the tube. But I can probably live with that by shutting down the ball valve, doing evacuation, turn the valve on and the gauge on once a while to check. I still have to deal with hose leaks and all kind of other things. Probably a good way would be to buy off the shelf vacuum rated hoses. I think it would not be too bad to fabricate 3/8 copper hoses for vacuuming purposes. That would connect both high and low side to the vacuum. The gauge set is completely out of the equation, other than a hose is connected behind a ball valve for nitrogen or adding charge.
    2-4 microns / second, I would be performing nitrogen sweep and re-evacuating. Like Beerme said, you have to install the vacuum rig on a larger volume test. Just the valve core tool will definitely show a failure. There's not enough volume.

    Just go buy a pair of the Appion 1/2" hose and valve core removal tool set up. Connect the 3/8" hose connectors directly to the pump, and the 1/4" hose connectors to the valve core tools which are directly to the unit. Install the vacuum gauge on one of the valve core tool side ports with the Schrader core out. Best bang for the buck.
    When your ready to upgrade get a BluVac gauge.

    I played around for years with all of that other BS. You're wasting your time. These companies have put A LOT of time in developing these tools. They work. Your time is more valuable than the couple hundred bucks it will cost, not to mention the headaches and frustration of not trusting what your make-shift vacuum rig is telling you. Did I want to spend the money? NO way, but I'm soooooo glad I did!
    "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing" Socrates

  7. Likes TruTech-Bill liked this post
  8. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by mgenius33 View Post
    2-4 microns / second, I would be performing nitrogen sweep and re-evacuating. Like Beerme said, you have to install the vacuum rig on a larger volume test. Just the valve core tool will definitely show a failure. There's not enough volume.
    I followed the youtube video link above on testing the gauge, which connects directly to the pump. I understand that with a much larger tank, any leak will be a percent of that larger tank and the pressure change is much smaller.

    But the experiences in this forum probably is sufficient to have a different/correct say.

    Quote Originally Posted by mgenius33 View Post
    I played around for years with all of that other BS. You're wasting your time. These companies have put A LOT of time in developing these tools. They work. Your time is more valuable than the couple hundred bucks it will cost, not to mention the headaches and frustration of not trusting what your make-shift vacuum rig is telling you. Did I want to spend the money? NO way, but I'm soooooo glad I did!
    Thanks for the words of wisdom. You're absolutely right. My tinkering my got a better of me.

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