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    The Gulf of Tonkin Incident & Abandonment of the Montagnards by America.

    Greetings Ya'll,

    This topic rose up, due to a dispute between Glenn & I over the cause of the Un-declared "Viet Nam War", & a Horrific consequence of that so called "Police Action", which was & is, that the American Government Abandoned a group of it's most loyal, dedicated & Fierce Allies the people of the South Viet Nam Highlands known then, & now as the Montagnards.

    I've been busy, gathering Verifiable Data about what the American Government did, & is doing now, as well as making Contacts with several of the Parties that have "On Site Experience", with the Montagnards, such as Members of The Nha Trang Mike Force, 5th Mobile Strike Force, 5th Special Forces Group Airborne, 1st Special Forces.

    Many Former Green Berets, & other Military Service Members have Physically helped Montagnards that were Abandoned, when America withdrew from Viet Nam, even though the American Government Fully Assured Leaders of the Montagnards that they would be Supplied & Assisted if, ... They continued Fighting the NVA & Viet Cong. That "help" never came, & the American Government basically forgot their Allies, that not only greatly Assisted the Fighting in the Highlands, but they also zealously laid down their Lives in the fight against Communism, alongside The Special Forces.

    These Special Forces Members have literally bought land in North Carolina, where a Compound has been established for the Surviving Montagnards that have fought their way out of Viet Nam & Cambodia, & made it to refugee Camps in Thailand, where they have been largely forced to stay, with some even being forced to return to Viet Nam.

    Now, as several of the articles that I'm going to post, will show, .... This Abandoning an "Ally", after they have been used up,or it no longer fits the "Political Theme of the Day", is still ongoing today, for America is basically performing the Same Act, with the Kurds, in the Un-declared War(s) in the Middle-east.

    What happened in Viet Nam, as well as what has happened & is ongoing, in the Middle-east, are not the Acts of a Government allegedly based upon The Founding Principles of a Nation, that once had no fear of Publicly showing it's steadfast belief in The Almighty Lord God of The Bible.


    The Truth, is hard to swallow, judging from the outcries of various Members of this Forum, over the "disagreement" between Glenn & I, but, .... as it is said, "The Truth will set You Free."
    ----------

    American Thinker

    September 30, 2018

    Will America Once Again Abandon Its Christian Montagnard Allies?
    By Michael Benge

    The Montagnard tribes in the Central Highlands were among our most loyal allies in the fight against the communists during the Vietnam War. They fought alongside the U.S. Special Forces in epic battles and rescued countless Americans, including pilots, crews, and aircraft passengers. More than half of the Montagnards' adult male population was lost fighting for and in the place of Americans. Without their sacrifice, there would be many more names on that somber black granite wall – the Vietnam Memorial.


    Today, our former Montagnard allies suffer immense persecution under the communist regime in Vietnam for their religious beliefs. Since the North's 1975 conquest of the Republic of South Vietnam,
    it is estimated that two thirds of the ethnic minorities have converted to Protestantism. They are forced to practice their worship in outlawed house-churches. The Vietnamese leadership is characterized by extreme paranoia and fear of organized religion, for it is in direct conflict with their political religion: communism. Those wishing to be ordained as a pastor must swear allegiance to the communist government and swear to put "the state" before God. All who refuse are arrested and tortured until they recant their religion, and if they do not, they are imprisoned or "disappeared." More than a hundred known Protestant Montagnard pastors are languishing in prison under deplorable and inhumane conditions. Despite this, they are not recognized by the Department of State as political prisoners.

    More than 350 Christian Montagnard refugees have fled persecution in Vietnam and are seeking asylum in Thailand. Of these, 175 have been granted refugee status by the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR). However, they will continue to be held in the camps until a third country notifies UNHCR that it is willing to sponsor them. Countless other refugees who have fled religious and other persecution in Vietnam are also seeking refuge in Thailand.

    There are frequent raids in the neighborhoods surrounding Bangkok, where refugees try to find a sense of community. According to International Christian Concern (ICC) (The Dispatch, 09/20/18):

    More than three weeks have passed since Thai authorities arrested and detained 181 mostly Christian Montagnard refugees on the outskirts of Bangkok on August 28. ICC sources have confirmed that all of the adults were sent to Immigration Detention Center (IDC), while 50 children, including young boys, girls, and infants, were sent to three different shelters.

    A local source told ICC that these shelters are not immigrant shelters, but rather shelters designed for Thai children who cannot stay in their homes. These shelters are not prepared to care for large numbers of Children who do not speak Thai, or for breastfeeding children separated from their mothers.


    Despite local rights groups' attempts to visit the children, they have not been granted permission. This means that these children, they have not been granted permission. This means that these children have not seen their parents, nor any familiar faces from local NGOs, for nearly three weeks. Separation anxiety and fear will take a toll on these children's health with each passing day.

    It was heartening to hear secretary of state Mike Pompeo say during Laura Ingraham's Fox News interview (09/20/18) that he and Vice President Michael Pence "are extremely concerned over Christian refugees who have seemingly been left out of the State Department's refugee program. Vice President Pence has made this a real priority, to ensure that Christians are being treated fairly and equitably in our processes." Unfortunately, he was referring to refugees in the Middle East, not Vietnam and Thailand. However, he did add:

    This administration is taking religious freedom all around the world, in China and other places, very seriously. Rest assured that the State Department is working to make sure that Christians are not being mistreated, prosecuted, persecuted, or treated in any way that's unfair as they try to make their way into the United States of America. You've seen what the President's doing with trade, to try and make it fair and reciprocal. What we're asking of China is to behave in a way that if they want to be a power, if they want to be on the global stage, they have to operate in a way that global leaders have for so often. And frankly, as you point out in the religious dimension, they've not done that.

    The Vietnamese communists' war against the Montagnards has never ended. The regime is now implementing a form of cultural genocide against them. As a result, despite Vietnam's thriving economy, our former allies are denied opportunities of meaningful employment and the government amenities afforded others in Vietnam, such as schooling, medical care, and adequate land to feed their families. The Montagnards have among the highest rates of malnourishment and infant death in Vietnam.

    In 1975, as the North Vietnamese communists began their final push to take over the Republic of South Vietnam, Montagnard leaders met with representatives from the American Embassy. The Americans encouraged them to flee to the jungle and continue the fight the communists, promising that if they did, the United States government would continue to support them. One of the most prestigious Montagnard leaders, the director of the Ministry for the Development of Ethnic Minorities, was promised by American deputy ambassador George Jacobson that he, his staff, and their families would be evacuated.
    In fact, they were abandoned. All those remaining at the Ministry were either killed or sent to the communists' gulags, AKA "re-education camps."

    Only a small handful of Montagnards were able to escape during the evacuation of Saigon and eventually make it to the United States. However, the Montagnards kept their agreement with the American Embassy. Tens of thousands fled to the jungles bordering Vietnam to continue the fight, only to be killed by the Vietnamese or die of malnourishment or disease when the promised U.S. assistance failed to materialize. They were buried in the jungle in unmarked graves. Nevertheless, the few survived and continued to fight.

    In 1986, a group of 212 Montagnard guerrilla fighters and their families – our abandoned allies – emerged from the jungles of Cambodia after 11 years of fighting the communists, fled to a refugee camp in Thailand, and were eventually resettled in North Carolina.
    In 1992, a second group of 400 Montagnard fighters and their families left the jungle in Eastern Cambodia, after waging 17 years of continued guerrilla war against the communists. They were dubbed the "Lost Battalion." They were also resettled in North Carolina, not far from Fayetteville – the home of the Green Berets.

    To Secretary Pompeo and Vice President Pence: Your policies to ensure that Christians are not prosecuted, persecuted, or mistreated as they try to make their way to America should also apply to Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand. What's good for the gander is also good for the geese!

    Will America once again abandon its Montagnard allies? The empty promises must stop here!

    Michael Benge spent eleven years in Vietnam as a Foreign Service officer; five as a POW. He is a student of Southeast Asian politics. He is active in advocating for human rights, religious freedom, and democracy for the countries of former Indochina and has written extensively on these subjects.



    https://www.americanthinker.com/arti...rd_allies.html
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    From The American Legions "Burnpit":

    Help save the Montagnard Peoples
    June 9th, 2010 by MOTHAX

    "For those who didn’t watch my earlier video on the Montagnard (or “Dega”’ sometimes “Degar”) people, the Save the Montagnard People website have a succinct history:

    The Central Highlands of Vietnam is the ancestral homeland of the Montagnard tribes, a peace loving people with an ancient tradition of living in harmony with nature and the cosmic forces. But their great forests and rich lands became a battlefield for communist ambitions and opposing powers, compelling their involvement in two successive wars that raged for nearly three decades. As Christians, religious freedom was an absolute must. Oppressed as an ethnic minority in their homeland, they sought political autonomy. As communism tolerates neither, they allied first with the French then the Americans. Following the communist victory in 1975, a third war began.

    Starting in 1986, U.S. Special Forces soldiers who served alongside the Montagnards started a modest effort to free some of the Yards from the certain religious and cultural oppression they faced. In that first year they managed to get about 250 Montagnards relocated to the states, settling them in central North Carolina with some spill over into South Carolina. In 1993, 450 more joined their brothers and sisters. And since then, in groups large and small, the relocation has continued, with their numbers in North Carolina now numbering roughly 8,000. "

    "My host for the weekend was George Clark (pictured above), a former Green Beret who later retired from the Marine Corps. George is equal parts focused humanitarian, and old time bard, all wrapped up in one frenzied bit of motion. When I arrived at the compound the STMP members were in the heat of discussing some topic I missed, but as I walked up, George broke out with one of his characteristic no-nonsense assessments:

    Ain’t no Generals coming out here! Never has been one out here. This building was made by NCOs, Special Forces and private citizens, not no Generals.


    The George-isms would continue unabated all weekend. George is everything that your favorite NCO was during service: focused, professional and fiercely loyal of his men. At one point he was talking to a local lawyer who aids the movement when he began discussing a local law enforcement official. “If that SOB pulls over one of my Yards again and calls him a ‘dirty Mexican’ there’s gonna be problems.” I was discussing George with two other STMP members and one said that when George tells you something, you can believe it is 100 percent true. Without a shred of irony at all, the second one corrected him saying, “well, at least 20 percent of the time anyway.” The first affirmed,” yeah, that’s about right.” As I sat there dumbfounded trying to see if I was being played with, I didn’t so much as note a hint of a smile. The U.S. betrayal of the Montagnard people is a national disgrace, made no less ignominious by the fact that almost no one knows about it. In 1975 the U.S. Gov’t met with the Montagnards and promised them help if they continued the fight against the Communist Government. They did, we didn’t. And thousands of Montagnards have been killed since. I was reminded of the words of JFK following the loss of China to the Maoists: "This is the tragic story of China whose freedom we once fought to preserve. What our young men had saved, our diplomats and our President have frittered away." So it is with the Montagnards….what the Special Forces and their Montagnard brothers worked so hard to create, our State Department and government has disowned by the most expedient manner, they simply ignored the crisis. As another STMP member told me “After seeing the way we’ve treated these people as a country….well, I’m no flag-waver now, that’s for damn sure.” And the fight continues today, as the STMP website details:

    "This is not to say that the Yards have fully incorporated themselves into the body politic. One rather humorous story that I was told involved the Yards constructing their longhouse. The Longhouse is built upon very large pillars of wood, probably a foot plus in diameter. The Yards were moving the large pieces of wood by hand when suddenly they had a much better idea. They would simply go down to the North Carolina Zoo and rent an elephant. When informed that you likely couldn’t “rent” an elephant, the Yards put some cognitive efforts into figuring out how to simply “borrow” the elephant at night, and return it before anyone missed it. Just how they would transport a 15,000 lbs animal with a rather noticeable proboscis in a manner that wouldn’t draw attention seems to (again) have not been discussed. A quick-thinking STMP member deftly circumscribed the plan by noting that all the elephants at the zoo were African ones, which (as all Yards know) are too stupid to do good work. One of the more interesting employers for the Yards is the Special Ops Center about an hour away at Ft. Bragg. For those who don’t know about Green Beret training, one of the hallmarks is the “Robin Sage.”


    "Part of the importance of such exercises is dealing with language barriers, working through interpreters, etc. In a remarkable show of common sense, the Special Ops Center has been hiring the Montagnards to play the part of the indigenous peoples at Robin Sage. As one man noted to me, not only are the Montagnards perfect for the training itself, but some of the younger Yards get to spend time with their Yard elders, learning some of the things that made them such heroic soldiers during Vietnam. The children seem to be doing very well at assimilating. As I walked around the compound I ran into many young folks, the vast bulk of whom spoke English without any noticeable accent. I ran into a few of the younger kids in the woods wearing “NC State Wrestling” T-shirts, or the shirts of various bands, Mr T. starter kits of gold chains and large medallions, even Yankees baseball caps. In short, they were just like every other teen today. Even the young ladies who were wearing native dress would have fit in at the mall or anywhere else young people congregate without drawing any more attention than attractive young ladies seem to get everywhere. George has told me that roughly 130 Yards have served in Afghanistan and Iraq since the War on Terrorism began. Various STMP members openly expressed hope that some of these would end up going into the Special Forces as well. There seems to be a pretty healthy amount of skepticism in the STMP for politicians. I heard both good and bad things about the local Congressman who while generally supportive of their efforts has not managed to get any federal funds or help for them. Although the huge stimulus bill last year was specifically intended for “shovel ready” jobs, the numerous jobs that fill that requirement at the compound received no funding. The STMP site abuts to a river, and they have secured a license to run canoeing trips from the property, but before anything like that could happen, there would need to be some road clearing and then setting up a dock. Something like that could employ a hundred yards, and all at roughly minimum wage. Right now precious artifacts from the Yards life in the Central Highlands are spread over a couple of areas on the compound. Some are in the Long House, some in another house located on the grounds. George wants to build a cultural center, so these valuable cultural implements can be viewed by anthropologists, historians and school kids. For now, this remains one of his dreams, only to be realized if they can get enough income and donations to bring it to fruition. "
    Since 1992, the US Montagnard community has grown from the aforementioned 412 to 3,000 through the Orderly Departure Program (ODP). Most were resettled in North Carolina while some went to Texas and Washington state. Vietnamese province-level communist officials are subverting this process to make money and punish those who want to join their loved ones in the US. ODP applicants must pay huge bribes to these officials, otherwise they will not receive timely word of emigration interviews. And when they are scheduled for interviews, many are beaten en route and robbed by Vietnamese thugs for the bribe money they carry. In 1996, Vietnamese communist paranoia of the Montagnard guerrillas and their determination to further demoralize them surfaced in a new tactic. When a Montagnard family reaches Saigon to depart the country via ODP, communist officials detain the man's wife and children. The man is told that his real spouse and children can not leave Vietnam with him. Instead he must take with him a Vietnamese woman with children of similar ages. If the Montagnard man does not cooperate, his spouse and children will suffer."

    "I moved in closer for more pictures when I realized that the emcee had been calling my name. I attempted to wave him off, I was there as a reporter, not a participant. But, fighting with a Yard on something like this is roughly as successful as teaching a pig physics, and I acceded and moved forward. I was guided to a chair in front of the stage as a troupe of dancers danced, and drummers drummed. The Montagnard emcee indicated through hand and arm signals that I should grab the aquarium hosing in front of me which went into some large jug on the floor. I had no idea what was going on. Eventually the seat next to me was occupied by a local LTC from Bragg who quietly told me to grab the tube and suck. And so suck I did. It was homemade rice wine, and I’m relieved I didn’t go blind. After about 2 minutes of sucking, I took to my unsteady feet and headed to the woodline. The tree which I was still propped up on half hour later became a very close friend of mine. "

    "What can you do to help? Well, if you have the cash, head on over to the Save The Montagnard People website and help them out. You can find the contact info there, and if you have questions, just call or email George.
    If you have something you want to donate, you can do it. If you want to donate time, you can do that too. On the political front, contact your Rep or Senator and see what they are doing to help our brave allies. If your Rep isn’t a cosponsor of H.R.1969 -- Vietnam Human Rights Act of 2009, find out why. (Here’s a hint, your Congressman likely is not, since it only has 12 cosponsors.) Unless you live in California, ask why your Senator hasn’t signed onto the companion piece, S 1159. But first and foremost, hunt around the internet and find out about the Montagnard People. The more you know the more you will be ashamed at the way our government has treated these people who died protecting our Special Forces soldiers. The Yards were there when we needed them, and our Gov’t went AWOL when it was needed in return. Let’s see what we can do to fix that."



    http://www.burnpit.us/2010/06/help-s...agnard-peoples
    Hos 4:6 My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge. Because you have rejected knowledge, I will also reject you, that you may be no priest to me. Because you have forgotten your God’s law, I will also forget your children.


    "You've got to Stand for Something or You'll fall for anything" (A. Tippin)


    Mat_15:24 But he answered, “I wasn’t sent to anyone but the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”

  2. #2
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    The History of the Montagnard People



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    Montagnard Assistance Project Mission

    ​Provide humanitarian assistance to Montagnard asylum seekers and refugees who have fled persecution in Vietnam. We also support Montagnard orphans in Kontum, Vietnam, and develop community programs to engage the future Montagnard leaders of tomorrow through projects such as Habitat for Humanity.

    The History of the Montagnard People


    The indigenous peoples of Vietnam’s Central Highlands are often referred to as “Montagnard” or Mountain People. Other tribal names include, “Anak Cu Chiang” or “Dega” referring to the “Original People” of the Central Highlands. Their ancient peoples inhabited the coast of Vietnam and later migrated to the Central Highlands region where they lived for centuries. Their tribes speak Mon Khmer and Austronesian (Malayo-Polynesian) languages. The ancient Malay Polynesian groups migrated from Polynesia and Indonesia, with the Mon Khmer speaking tribes migrating from Burma (Myanmar.)

    The Malayo-Polynesian languages are spoken by the Rhade, Jarai, Chru, Rai (Seyu), Roglai, and Hroy. Mon Khmer languages include those spoken by the Bahnar, Rengao, Sedand, Halang, Jeh, Monom, Koho, and Chrau, Katu, Phuang, Bru and Pacoh.

    Prior to 1800, the Central Highlands tribal peoples lived isolated in a highlands existence under a feudal system of government living peacefully with their own customs, culture and traditions in a village-centered society. They were separated from lowland cultures, and their spiritual life was rooted in their relationship with the land; the rivers, lakes, and forests. The life of the Montagnard “Anak Cu Chiang” peoples revolved around nature; the seasons, family, and village. Their weapons were crossbows and spears for hunting. For our transportation, they used horses and elephants.

    There are over 28 tribal groups with the five major tribes being: Bahnar, Jarai, Rhade, Koho and Mnong. The early peoples believed in nature spirits and the divine, “Ae Die” (Grandfather Sky / God) was present in all creation.

    In the last 200 years, the outsiders- the French, Vietnamese, Americans and present day Vietnamese government, used our ancestral land. Their land became a battlefield for over thirty years. During the French-Indochina and Vietnam wars (1945-1975), the Montagnard Indigenous Peoples were used as a tool of the war and their people became victims of the conflict on their ancestor’s land. As a result, more than a million Montagnards were killed and eighty-five percent of their villages were destroyed or abandoned. The Montagnards fought and died for France’s interests in Vietnam, for America, and especially for the dream of freedom which today, benefits all Vietnamese people in Vietnam.


    April 30, 1975 until Present
    After the North Vietnamese Communists took over South Vietnam; the Montagnard Indigenous Peoples who had survived the war continued to die under the Vietnam communist regime. Thousands of Montagnards were captured and executed by the Communist regime, or died in “re-education” prisons.


    Over 12,000 Montagnards who escaped to the jungles of Vietnam, Cambodia and Thailand continued fighting the Vietnamese Communists for 17 years from 1975-1992 with the name, “Front de Liberation des Hauts-Plateaux Montagnard (FLHPM). Of this group, only about 600 survived, the rest having been killed in military actions, eaten by tigers, snake bites, disease or starvation.

    Today the Montagnard people have lost more than any other group in Vietnam. Human Rights Watch has produced several reports over the past 5 years, and they agree that the Montagnard Indigenous peoples of Vietnam are some of most “marginalized” people in that region of the world. They have had their ancestral lands literally stolen from them by the Vietnamese government. They hacve also lost their language, the right to have home churches, the right to access international scholarships for education and travel, and the right to operate traditional courts.

    They are on the brink of losing their entire culture. Traditional ways of life have been systematically abolished. Development assistance, education, and humanitarian aid continue to be blocked and international observers are restricted from the Central Highlands. The Central Highlands has become a kind of prison for the Montagnard people with the Communist system of internal security and secret police. The Hanoi government considers the “Anak Cu Chiang” Montagnard indigenous peoples as a long term historical enemy. A campaign of “Vietnamization”, assimilation and “ethnic-cleansing” has continued to this very day. Many of the refugee’s and asylum seekers in present day Thailand and Cambodia were imprisoned for organizing house church services, and many of them were tortured repeatedly until they either renounce their religion, or they become so physically broken that they are then returned to their village to die.

    In 2015, “Vietnam’s official media made it shockingly clear that persecution of religious minorities is state policy,” said Human Rights Watch’s (HRW) Asia director, Brad Adams, after the advocacy group released a report on Friday (26 June). Compiling interviews with Vietnamese ethnic Montagnards seeking asylum abroad, the report reveals the government’s deliberate actions to persecute the ethnic minority because of their desire to follow Christianity.

    Finally, American’s have a very special responsibility and debt to these former allies who sacrificed so much because of their loyalty to our Special Forces units, other U.S. Army units, as well as the CIA. Over 50% of their military age men were killed during the Vietnam War working with us, and estimates are that over 200,000 innocent men, women and children were killed by the Viet Cong and NVA. When we abandoned these faithful allies in 1975, we left them all behind to suffer the wrath of the communist government. We owe them our very best efforts to help in pressing the Vietnamese government for changes in their policies of discrimination to the indigenous Montagnard peoples of the Central Highlands. We also have a responsibility to give assistance to the many asylum seekers and refugees who still are hiding in the jungles of Cambodia and Thailand, fearing the retribution of the Vietnamese government.



    http://www.montagnardassist.org/montagnard-history.html
    Hos 4:6 My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge. Because you have rejected knowledge, I will also reject you, that you may be no priest to me. Because you have forgotten your God’s law, I will also forget your children.


    "You've got to Stand for Something or You'll fall for anything" (A. Tippin)


    Mat_15:24 But he answered, “I wasn’t sent to anyone but the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”

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    This is Part 1 of the Digital VFW Magazine of March 2019, pages 34 -38, with the Story about Green Beret George Clark 5th Special Forces Group Airborne, Nha Trang Mike Force, a member of VFW Post 1957 in Hickory, North Carolina, & his time with the Montagnards, as well as 2Lt. Don Allen 3rd Battalion, 6th Artillery,1st Field Force Artillery

    I Apologize for not having the "Know How" to reproduce the Article herein for viewing.

    But Please take note of Sgt Clark plainly stating, on page 38, ... "When we pulled out of Viet Nam, those villages were screwed and We knew it." , with 2Lt Caldwell Agreeing!

    I'm also hoping to be able speak with these Men, & the many other Special Forces Members that have dedicated a great deal of Time & Expense to helping these Allies that Our Government Abandoned, by the end of this week.

    I'd also Love to listen in on a Conversation, where some "Un-educated","Ignorant", perhaps "Intentionally Dumbed Down" individual (s) accused these Combat Veterans of "Fabricating The Truth" (Lying) about what America's Government did to the Montagnards.





    http://digitaledition.qwinc.com/publication/?i=563492#{%22issue_id%22:563492,%22page%22:36}
    Hos 4:6 My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge. Because you have rejected knowledge, I will also reject you, that you may be no priest to me. Because you have forgotten your God’s law, I will also forget your children.


    "You've got to Stand for Something or You'll fall for anything" (A. Tippin)


    Mat_15:24 But he answered, “I wasn’t sent to anyone but the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”

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    Summary of Montagnard History

    By Rong Nay

    (* For further information, please refer to SONS OF THE MOUNTAINS and FREE IN THE FOREST by Gerald Cannon Hickey ( Yale University Press), WE HAVE EATEN THE FOREST by Georges Condominas (Kodansha International Press) and SHATTERED WORLD by Gerald Cannon Hickey (University of Pennsylvania Press)


    "The indigenous peoples of Vietnam’s Central Highlands are often referred to as “Montagnard” or Mountain People. Other tribal names include, “Anak Cu Chiang” or “Dega” referring to the “Original People” of the Central Highlands. Our ancient peoples inhabited the coast of Vietnam and later migrated to the Central Highlands region where we lived for centuries. Our tribes speak Mon Khmer and Austronesian (Malayo-Polynesian) languages. The ancient Malay Polynesian groups migrated from Polynesia and Indonesia, with the Mon Khmer speaking tribes migrating from Burma (Myanmar.)

    The Malayo-Polynesian languages are spoken by the Rhade, Jarai, Chru, Rai (Seyu), Roglai, and Hroy. Mon Khmer languages include those spoken by the Bahnar, Rengao, Sedand, Halang, Jeh, Monom, Koho, and Chrau, Katu, Phuang, Bru and Pacoh."

    "In the last 200 years, the outsiders- the French, Vietnamese, Americans and present day Vietnamese government, used our ancestral land. Our land became a battlefield for over thirty years. During the French-Indochina and Vietnam wars (1945-1975), the Montagnard Indigenous Peoples were used as a tool of the war and our people became victims of the conflict on our ancestor’s land. As a result, more than a million Montagnards were killed and eighty-five percent of our villages were destroyed or abandoned. The Montagnards fought and died for France’s interests in Vietnam, for America, and especially for the dream of freedom which today, benefits all Vietnamese people in Vietnam."

    "July 21, 1954– The Geneva Convention announced the end of the Indochina War. At the Convention, there were delegations from France, Britain, the U.S., Soviet Union, the Republic of China, Cambodia, Laos, South Vietnam and North Vietnam. Only the French and the Vietnamese representatives signed the agreement on the cessation of hostilities in Vietnam. The French did not allow representatives of the Montagnard people to participate in the Convention and consequently the Montagnard voice and interests for their homeland and territory was not represented.

    Vietnam was divided into two countries. Ho Chi Minh assumed leadership in North Vietnam and King Bao Dai of South Vietnam, divided by the 17th parallel. Later Ngo Dinh Diem, with support by United States became the first President of the Republic of South Vietnam. The French agreed to withdraw from Vietnam. The order was given to strike down both the French and Montagnard flags and the South Vietnam flag was raised. Thousands of Montagnads were stunned by this betrayal when the French transferred all Montagnard land and governance to South Vietnam."


    "1961-1972, The United States backed South Vietnam in the Vietnam War. The American Special Forces recruited and trained over 40,000 Montagnard troops who fought and died alongside the American soldiers with courage, loyalty and enduring friendship. The Montagnard leaders were told, and most believed, that the U.S. government would help the Montagnard people regain their autonomous state with the rights for self-determination and self-governance. Finally, the Montagnard people were exploited and exterminated by both governments of North and South Vietnam."


    "May 4, 1967, Y Bham Enuol, as the leader of the Montagnard Independence Movement, formally proposed that the Saigon government accept the following 8 points of the Montagnard people’s aspirations according to the 1958 Montagnard BAJARAKA vision for self-determination and an independent sovereign nation for the Montagnard Anak Cu Chiang peoples in the Central Highlands:

    To accord a special statute and a special Constitution for the Montagnard people
    To set up a special commission for Montagnard affairs at Buon Ama Thuot, the capital of the Montagnard Republic, Plateaus Montagnard Du Sud (PMS)
    To permit recruitment and organization of the Montagnard Armed Forces
    To return to the Central Highlands all Montagnard civil servants and military men on duty outside Montagnard territory
    To permit the Montagnard people to receive aid directly form the U.S. or from other nations
    To raise the Montagnard flag to the same height as the Vietnamese flag
    To clearly mark the borders of the Central Highlands so that the Montagnard people could regain their autonomy
    To agree to the participation of the Montagnard people in another Geneva Conference or in other international conferences to resolve issues

    The Saigon government was reluctant and continued its inhumane policies towards the Montagnard people. Montagnard troops continued to fight with the South against North Vietnamese Communists and Montagnard people continued to suffer."


    "March 30, 1972 North Vietnam continued its sweeping offensive and attacked many Montagnard villages in the Central Highlands. As a result of the fighting, the wounded, homeless, malnourished and displaced Montagnard people died by the thousands.

    October 20, 1973, Y Bham Enuol, living in exile in Cambodia, decided to nominate Kpa Koi as the vice-president of the Montagnard Independence Movement, FLHPM, and continued to struggle and demand that the Vietnamese government satisfy the eight point proposal for Montagnard self-governance and autonomy.

    In 1973, the U.S. Armed Forces withdrew from Vietnam following a cease-fire agreement with the North Vietnamese. All Montagnard Special Forces units were transformed into Vietnamese units and under Vietnamese commanders.

    March 3-10 1975, the North Vietnamese forces overran Ban Me Thuot ( Buon Ama Thuot) Pleiku, Kontum, Dak Nong and Dalat and March 11, 1975, the South Vietnamese Government’s Air Force bombed Buon Pa Lam, killing 125 Montagnards and wounding 210. The entire village was burned to the ground and Montagnard villagers were forced to flee from their homes suffering terribly with no clothing, blankets, food or medical help.


    March 24, 1975, President Thieu informed three high level American officials that he was withdrawing his forces from the Central Highlands and requested that the U.S. Air Force consider the Central Highlands as a free bombing area.

    April 4, 1975 Nay Luett, the Montagnard Minister for Ethnic Minority Development, and many other Montagnard leaders, met with George Jacobsen, Assistant the to the U.S. Ambassador, Colonel Lamar Prosser, and Edward Sprague.
    Nay Luett asked for protection for the Montagnard leaders and people because he knew genocide would be committed upon the Montagnard people. He also proposed to organize a 50,000 member strong Montagnard Force, with support from the United States, to defend the Montagnard people in the Central Highlands, but Mr. Jacobsen and the South Vietnam government refused. (*See article “A Debt Too Far” in the Montagnard Human Rights Organization website www.mhro.org)"

    "April 30, 1975 until Present

    After the North Vietnamese Communists took over South Vietnam; the Montagnard Indigenous Peoples who survived the war continued to die under the Vietnam communist regime. Several thousand Montagnards were captured and executed by the Communist regime or died in “re-education” prisons. The Montagnard freedom, autonomy and self-government promised by Ho Chi Minh never became a reality and hundreds of Montagnard leaders who experienced and remembered Ho Chi Minh’s promise were killed. These leaders include: Y Bih Aleo, Rcom Briu, and Y Ngong Nie Kdam. The secret executions continue today.

    Over 12,000 Montagnards who escaped to the jungles of Vietnam, Cambodia and Thailand continued fighting the Vietnamese Communists for 17 years from 1975-1992 with the name, “Front de Liberation des Hauts-Plateaux Montagnard (FLHPM) under the direction of Commander Y Ghok Nie Krieng and Assistant Commander, Rong Nay.

    The aim was to resist the Communists and to continue fighting for Montagnard freedom and independence. Over 8,000 died in the jungle because of starvation, disease, attack by tiger, and combat wounds."

    "February 1986, the Montagnard Force (FLHPM, the Montagnard Highlands Liberation Front, often referred to as FULRO) decided to lay down arms to the Thai government and ask for political asylum in the U.S. On Nov. 24, 1986, the first group of 212 Montagnard soldiers with all the former FLHPM leaders was resettled in North Carolina, U.S. as refugees."

    "November 1992 The second remaining group of 417 former soldiers and their families were airlifted from a remote northeastern territory in Cambodia, to Phnom Penh, and also came to North Carolina, USA. The Montagnard Resistance Movement was over and a new, peaceful struggle would continue for Montagnard human rights, the rule of law, and Montagnard self-determination in the Central Highlands of Vietnam."


    "2001 to 2004, over 30,000 Montagnard people staged peaceful protests in Pleiku and Daklak provinces against the Hanoi regime. They demanded the return of their lands, the right to live and the right to freedom of religion. The Hanoi government responded by sending huge numbers of police and military forces into the Central Highlands and expelled foreigners and news media. They used tanks and helicopters to crush the Montagnard protest. Hundreds of Montagnards were killed, over 2,000 were missing, and over 500 were arrested, and jailed up to 17 years.

    Today the Montagnard people have lost more than any other group in Vietnam. We have lost the right to live, the right to own our ancestral lands, our language, the right to have home churches, the right to access international scholarships for education and travel, and the right to operate traditional courts."


    "ADVOCACY MISSION TO THE U.S. CAPITOL

    On April 8-10 2013, the Council of Indigenous Peoples in Today’s Vietnam carried out its first important advocacy mission to Washington, DC.

    The delegation consisted of Tan Dara Thach, President, Vice Presidents Andrew Tu and Rong Nay, Council Members Kahleelah Porome, Kevin Champa, CamVan Tran, Anna Ksor Buonya, Dararoth Thach, and advisor, Kay Reibold.
    Read More

    U.S Congressional Hearing on Vietnam’s Violations of Human Rights, April 11, 2013

    See video of hearing at:

    http://foreignaffairs.house.gov/hear...ons-advance-us
    "



    http://ciptvn.org/montagnard-nation/
    Hos 4:6 My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge. Because you have rejected knowledge, I will also reject you, that you may be no priest to me. Because you have forgotten your God’s law, I will also forget your children.


    "You've got to Stand for Something or You'll fall for anything" (A. Tippin)


    Mat_15:24 But he answered, “I wasn’t sent to anyone but the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”

  5. #5
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    Special Forces pay for Montagnard farmland
    Archive Manager
    December 26, 2006




    by Amy Kingsley

    Dozens of Montagnards, natives of Vietnam’s Central Highlands, and former Special Forces soldiers gathered early on Dec. 16 to wrap bicycles, dolls and other toys for refugee children. Members of Save the Montagnard People, an advocacy group made up of Vietnam War veterans, unwrapped the biggest gift of all in the afternoon: the deed to 101 acres in Randolph County.

    Richard “Bear” Shorten, a member of the 1st Special Forces Group, cut a check for several thousand dollars on behalf of his battalion to secure the land for Montagnard refugees. Representatives from Save the Montagnard People said the land would be placed in trust to be used as a summer camp and cultural center for North Carolina’s 9,000 Montagnard residents."

    "Special Forces soliers served alongside Montagnards during the Vietnam War and developed close ties to the people, who were oppressed by the Vietnamese. Montagnards started settling in North Carolina in the 1980s after persecution by the Vietnamese government escalated; they chose this area because of its large military population.

    “This will be the best thing to happen to the Montagnards since they came to America,” said George Clark, president of Save the Montagnard People.


    Thousands of Montagnards have been driven out of the Central Highlands and into Cambodia, many of them persecuted for their Christian religious beliefs and for aiding the Americans during the war. Thousands have been resettled in America, and it is unclear when or if conditions in Vietnam will allow them to return to their homeland.

    “What Save the Montagnard People, Special Forces Association, Mike Force Association and Special Operations Association are doing is not only fulfilling the phrase ‘de oppresso liber’ but also saving an entire culture from extinction,” said former Mike Force member Larry Pease."

    "The United Dega Asheboro project started more than three years ago when Special Forces service organizations obtained a mortgage for the 101 rural acres outside of Asheboro. They’ve built a covered picnic area, refurnished an old farmhouse and started to erect longhouses to represent all seven Montagnard tribes. In the future the organization plans to secure funding for a cultural center and start a traditional summer camp for Montagnard children younger than 15.

    “The land being paid off is a promise fulfilled to the Montagnards,” wrote George Clark, president of Save the Montagnard People, in a statement. “A promise that many of you helped to get started and continued to support over the years. The land project is the future for the Montagnards, it guarantees the survival of a noble culture and will leave a living monument to all Montagnards and Special Forces Veterans.”

    To comment on this story, e-mail Amy Kingsley at amy@yesweekly.com



    https://yesweekly.com/Special-Forces...armland-a7599/
    Hos 4:6 My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge. Because you have rejected knowledge, I will also reject you, that you may be no priest to me. Because you have forgotten your God’s law, I will also forget your children.


    "You've got to Stand for Something or You'll fall for anything" (A. Tippin)


    Mat_15:24 But he answered, “I wasn’t sent to anyone but the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”

  6. #6
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    Abandoned to the Wolves: Bobby Garwood discussed the Montagnards

    "Tribal Action Group
    Published on Feb 11, 2018
    Former POW from the Vietnam War - Bobby Garwood - discusses his experiences with the indigenous Montagnards.. The Vietnam communist government has brutally persecuted these people for decades. Currently in 2018 there are some 500 Montagnard refugees in South East Asia.
    Category
    Nonprofits & Activism"


    Mr. Garwood exposed a great deal that Our Political Heroes McCain & Kerry lied about.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4x_mNHkvK7w
    -----------------------

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oSQ_8fv7LQU

    ------------------

    This is a approx. 40 minute Interview of several members of "Mike Force" speaking of the Montagnards

    Steve Hollingshead
    Published on Apr 19, 2018
    During the Vietnam War the US Army Special Forces other wise known as the Green Berets trained and used a Civilian Indigenous Defense Group (CIDG) of local natives known as the Montangnards as a Mobile Strike Force or Mike Force.
    This as one of five documentaries I shot in order to preserve the history of the Special Forces and on this one specifically the Montangnards.
    Please help the Save the Montangnard People (STMP) by contributing to the address at the end of the film.

    "Steve Hollingshead
    Executive Producer
    HMW Productions
    813-597-1603

    Category
    People & Blogs"

    These Combat Veterans, not only Highly Speak of The Montagnards, & their Experiences with them in the Viet Nam Highlands,but also what they have done for the Montagnards here in America, out of their own pocket, ... due to the very little assistance given by any of The Administrations in Washington D.C., since America evacuated Viet Nam.

    One Special Forces Veteran at 33:49 plainly states :


    "We Cut and Run on them." & "The Vietnamese have probably slaughtered half of the Montagnard Nation by now."

    One might want to replay that part several times, so that it fully gets Mentally Digested.



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oBbRmHsVv_w&t=2126s
    Hos 4:6 My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge. Because you have rejected knowledge, I will also reject you, that you may be no priest to me. Because you have forgotten your God’s law, I will also forget your children.


    "You've got to Stand for Something or You'll fall for anything" (A. Tippin)


    Mat_15:24 But he answered, “I wasn’t sent to anyone but the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”

  7. #7
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    The American Legion

    "Saving the Montagnards
    By Jeff Stoffer
    Mar 15, 2010


    George Clark, a former Green Beret who commanded indigenous Montagnard soldiers during the Vietnam War, has dedicated his life to their post-war safety and rescue from oppression. Over the years, he and his fellow members of STMP, Inc. - Save the Montagnard People, Inc. - have helped more than 2,000 "Yards" out of the central highlands of Vietnam and into the United States.


    In Vietnam, Clark says, Montagnard - or Dega - people are currently subjected to religious persecution from the government, property seizure, and even torture and death in what STMP describes as nothing less than genocide.

    Clark, who is president of the organization, met with members of The American Legion's National Security and Foreign Relations Commissions in Washington, D.C., earlier this month to urge support for S.R. 1159 and H.R. 1969, Senate and House versions of similar legislation that would cut off U.S. aid to Vietnam without dramatic and documented improvements in the communist nation's treatment of ethnic minorities.

    The Vietnam Human Rights Act of 2009 was introduced last April and, according to the STMP Web site, "seems to be going nowhere."

    In the meantime, Clark told the commissions, the lives of 149 Montagnards currently held in Cambodia near the Vietnam border are known to be in immediate danger. "I need your help getting these people out," Clark told the Legionnaires. "There have been over 350 Montagnards executed in the last 18 months. We don't need bombs. We don't need bullets."

    Clark implored his fellow veterans to contact their congressional representatives and get them to move on the bills, which would restrict all funding other than humanitarian aid, to the nation of Vietnam.

    "These people have a right to live," Clark said. "They are there, waiting and hoping for us to help them. Morality, loyalty, courage - that's what matters. Let's not forget them."

    "For many years after U.S. troops left Vietnam, the Montagnards fought a hit-and-run guerrilla war against the communist government, which has since been accused of ethnic cleansing in regard to the Dega people, largely due to their support for American military efforts during the Vietnam War.Clark and members of STMP regularly travel to Southeast Asia, and last year they helped 102 Montagnards out under U.N. rules. However, thousands more remain.

    A majority of the refugees who have gotten out have settled in North Carolina, where STMP has assisted them in job pursuit, education and acculturation. Donations helped the veterans recently pay off a piece of farm property near Asheboro, N.C., for the close-knit tribal culture.

    Each year, STMP conducts a Memorial Day Picnic and a September Montagnard Day of Remembrance in North Carolina. The group - with especially strong support of U.S. Special Forces veterans who worked closely with the Montagnards in Vietnam - also manages an education fund for the refugees.

    To learn more, visit www.montagnards.org on the Web."




    https://www.legion.org/security/8937/saving-montagnards
    Hos 4:6 My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge. Because you have rejected knowledge, I will also reject you, that you may be no priest to me. Because you have forgotten your God’s law, I will also forget your children.


    "You've got to Stand for Something or You'll fall for anything" (A. Tippin)


    Mat_15:24 But he answered, “I wasn’t sent to anyone but the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”

  8. #8
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    These people bet on America … and lost

    by KEVIN KNODELL

    "Last summer, the Free Syrian Army was getting ready to deliver what it thought would be a deathblow to the Syrian regime—with the military might of the world’s most powerful countries backing it up. The U.S. and France seemed ready to intervene to end the then-two-year-old Syrian civil war.

    French warplanes were primed to strike at Syrian regime targets the moment U.S. Pres. Barack Obama signaled the launch of the intervention and loosed cruise missiles from American warships. Anticipating air support, the FSA had already begun its offensive.

    Then on Aug. 31, Obama called off the attack. Washington opted to negotiate. America’s abrupt change of heart shocked the FSA and the French and disrupted carefully-laid war plans."

    "It wasn’t the first time the United States had abandoned people fighting for their lives. People who counted on American help."

    "To be fair, the Syrian conflict is a mess, involving a regime backed by Russia and Iran and rebels who fight each other as often as they battle the government. If America had intervened, it could have found itself fighting another long war.

    It was probably a good idea from the U.S. perspective to stay out of Syria. But it would have been better for America to never have implied it might do otherwise—and get people hoping, and planning, for U.S. support.

    The FSA suffered horrible casualties after Washington nixed air strikes. On that August battlefield, America risked alienating Syria’s rebels—men and women who just might become the leaders of a future free Syria.

    And that’s the best possible scenario. It’s equally likely the rebels will lose the war, dooming millions of people to continued oppression by Syria’s brutal regime. In any event, tomorrow’s crises could spring from yesterday’s political calculations."


    "It’s happened before. America has a long, sad history of abandoning its friends."


    "Secret army

    The Hmong ethnic group made up a large portion of the CIA’s “Secret Army” in Laos during the Vietnam War. The Hmongs conducted operations against the North Vietnamese Army and Vietcong guerrillas staging along the Ho Chi Minh trail, as well as against the Laotian Pathet Lao communists.

    Hmong fighters were central to CIA operations between 1962 and 1975. Vast though they were, these ops were always regarded as secret. As a result, when the Pathet Lao rose to power, the CIA more or less disavowed the Secret Army."


    "Although the Secret War had more or less ceased to be secret by this point, the U.S. government had never officially acknowledged it. Critics accused Clinton of falling back on that secrecy so the government could deny it owed the Hmongs anything.

    Congress shamed the Clinton administration into acting. On May 15, 1997, the government reversed three decades of denial and acknowledged the war in Laos and the Hmongs’ role. That same year, Arlington National Cemetery dedicated the Laos Memorial. Many Hmongs facing forced repatriation to Laos were able to re-locate to the United States instead.

    A similar but more obscure story concerns Vietnam’s Degar people, better known as the Montagnards, a French term meaning “mountain people.” America’s collective amnesia about the Motagnards is odd, considering they featured prominently in stories by Time and in John Wayne’s The Green Berets.

    The Montagnards are descendents of Polynesians who settled in Vietnam’s rugged central highlands. The Montagnards and Vietnamese never really got along. The mountain people sided with Saigon during the Vietnam War, but never trusted the southern regime."


    "As the war went on, the Montagnards increasingly came under Vietnamese command. Though some did well in the elite South Vietnamese Rangers, many Vietnamese officers still regarded them as savages.

    At a meeting at the U.S. embassy in Saigon on April 4, 1975, State Department officials promised to support the Montagnards if they campaigned against the North Vietnamese in the Central Highlands.

    The Montagnards agreed.
    But in truth, Washington had tired of the war and had no intention of actually helping the mountain people.

    Hanoi placed bounties on the Montagnard fighters. Many fled to Cambodia. But Cambodia—then in Pol Pot’s bloody grip—was little better. Pol Pot forced many Montagnards to join the Khmer Rouge."


    "Special Forces veterans started a grassroots campaign to get their former comrades out of harm’s way and into the United States. Many of the Montagnards who managed to escape settled in North Carolina, home of Army Special Forces.

    Veterans started Save the Montagnard People, a non-profit that helps Montagnards integrate in the U.S. The group maintains a camp called the New Central Highlands in Asheboro, N.C., complete with a traditional longhouse and cemetery.

    “After seeing the way we’ve treated these people as a country … well, I’m no flag-waver now, that’s for damn sure,” one Special Forces veteran said."

    "Desert uprising

    The 1991 Gulf War had an immensely unpleasant epilogue for the supposed victors. Battered by the U.S. coalition, Iraqi Pres. Saddam Hussein looked weak. The Shi’ites in Iraq’s south and the Kurds in the north launched simultaneous uprisings against Hussein’s Ba’athists.


    To the rebels, this was long overdue. The Kurds had endured the bloody Al Anfal genocide of the 1980s and the horrific gas attack against Halabja in ’88. Hussein’s government had marginalized the Shi’ites and particularly the Marsh Arabs.

    American radio broadcasts encouraged the Iraqis to rebel. The Iraqis believed this to mean that the Americans supported their uprisings. That is why, when the Americans began pulling back after declaring victory, the Shi’ites and Kurds were dismayed.

    No longer needing to defend against American attacks, regime troops turned on the rebels. Gunships rained death on Kurdish and Shi’ite communities. The Kurds fled north. Great Britain launched Operation Safe Haven to protect these refugees—and pressured the U.S. to send troops to help.

    In the south, the Marsh Arabs had no outside help. Hussein embarked on a campaign of intentional ecological destruction. The Ba’athist government drained huge sections of Iraq’s southern marshes, destroying the homes and livelihoods of thousands of Marsh Arabs."

    "Iraqi reunion

    Many Iraqis never forgot. While no supporters of Hussein, they where skeptical of the 2003 U.S. invasion. Still, many answered the Americans’ call. Thousands joined the coalition as interpreters.

    Interpreters accompanied coalition troops into combat, risking of reprisal against them and their families. Some coalition nations including Denmark and Poland offered visas to any Iraqis who had worked with their forces. But the U.S. and the U.K., by far the largest recruiters, forced interpreters to navigate a labyrinth of paperwork that for many proved impossible.

    Like the Montagnards and Hmongs, Iraqi interpreters for America and Britain had to rely on the goodwill of former comrades. Charities like the Checkpoint One Foundation, founded by National Guardsmen Jason Faler, were instrumental in helping many interpreters clear immigration hurdles.

    Still, the process often took years—too long for some interpreters to outrun insurgent death squads.

    Today America is leaving Afghanistan after 13 years of war—and also leaving behind Afghan interpreters and staff. Like we’ve learned nothing from Vietnam and Iraq.

    Individual Americans have proved loyal. But the courage of private citizens can’t make up for the government’s dereliction.

    If we’re going to wage war abroad with the assistance of local people, we must be prepared to treat those people as well as we do our our veterans. And that sense of honor should inform our entire foreign policy." AMEN!!!!!!!



    https://medium.com/war-is-boring/the...d-ca5a6f7293df
    Hos 4:6 My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge. Because you have rejected knowledge, I will also reject you, that you may be no priest to me. Because you have forgotten your God’s law, I will also forget your children.


    "You've got to Stand for Something or You'll fall for anything" (A. Tippin)


    Mat_15:24 But he answered, “I wasn’t sent to anyone but the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”

  9. #9
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    Removed member's name from thread title, it's too close to being a callout.

    Other than that, we'll allow the thread for now. But this is a matter that could get emotional and turn nasty, so the ARPC will be watching. Please keep the discussion factual and civil.

    Thanks

    ARPC

  10. #10
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    I'm Cool with that Special-K.

    And I Assure You Sir, .... It is "Emotional & Nasty", for it has caused the deaths of many Americans, as well as Our Allies.

    And, It Absolutely will be "factual and civil" on My part.
    Hos 4:6 My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge. Because you have rejected knowledge, I will also reject you, that you may be no priest to me. Because you have forgotten your God’s law, I will also forget your children.


    "You've got to Stand for Something or You'll fall for anything" (A. Tippin)


    Mat_15:24 But he answered, “I wasn’t sent to anyone but the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidDeBord View Post
    I'm Cool with that Special-K.

    And I Assure You Sir, .... It is "Emotional & Nasty", for it has caused the deaths of many Americans, as well as Our Allies.

    And, It Absolutely will be "factual and civil" on My part.
    Ahhh, I was hoping for brevity in there somewhere!

  12. #12
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    There was a psyschrinck that had a job of evaluating folks in a mental institution... to decide if they were ready to go back out into the real world...

    After interviewing a person who one might think was in good mental shape...
    The report was not the same as one might think...

    The psyschrinck...
    Determined the resident,
    Was quite positive about the fact he was literally crazy!
    And just because the person displayed a positive attitude... did NOT mean the person was fit to leave the institution and live in the outside world... both for the safety of the patient, and the safety of the rest of the world outside the walls of the institution.

    Why post this in a thread about VietNam????

    To remind folks... that just because someone is very positive about what they say...
    Does NOT mean they have a clue what they are talking about.
    Now what they say may well be quite accurate... but again it may be as loony as a pink $3 bill...

    The point... is not, NOT to let the emotion of being positive about ones verbiage...
    Subtly fool the reader into believing the writer, simply because of the supporting attitude.

    Note that GA did not say whether he believes the writer is correct or incorrect...
    That was not the point.
    Rather, the point was and is: to not let the strong positive attitude and actions of the presenter... sway the evaluation of the facts and details.

    Carry on...
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

  13. Likes glennac liked this post
  14. #13
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    Thread Starter
    Hunting Montagnards In Cambodia

    By The Co Van
    February 22, 2007


    "They still hunt Montagnards here in the eastern province of Mondulkiri, Cambodia, like the Native American Indians were hunted down in the Old West in the United States. It’s hard to believe that such a thing could still be happening in the year 2006 and that the rest of the world doesn’t give a damn, but that’s the way it is here.

    The irony is that hunting the forest animals for meat is now against the law in Cambodia but there is no such prohibition when it comes to hunting humans who flee oppression from the nearby police state of Vietnam.

    The main crimes of the minority peoples of Southeast Asia is that they aligned themselves with the Americans during the Vietnam War and that the hardliners in the Hanoi politburo have never strayed from their obsession with collecting their blood debt after the war. The communist party of Indochina founded by Ho Chi Minh has given the world the boat people, the reeducation camps, the genocide of the Hmong people in Laos, and the killing fields of Cambodia.

    The Vietnamese communist party apparatus still maintains a virtual iron curtain around the Central Highlands of Vietnam that used to be the traditional homeland for the 54 ethnic hill tribes loosely defined as Montagnards. No Montagnard can leave a village without a pass, their leaders are confined to house arrest, and many are in prison that refuse to denounce their protestant religion."

    "The UNHCR who is supposed to be there to assist the Montagnard refugees then enters the picture. After most of the Montagnards have been captured and sold back to the Vietnamese, Prime Minister Hun Sen gives permission to the UNHCR in Phnom Penh to travel to Mondulkiri to help the escaping Montagnards."

    "The US Consulate staff in Vietnam has adapted the UNHCR’s view of the Montagnards’ plight in the Central Highlands in that the Montagnards themselves are the cause for most of their difficulties and that there are no human rights abuses there."

    "There is an iron curtain that surrounds the Central Highlands today. There is absolutely no independent inquiry allowed there. Even our own ambassador can’t visit there independently. There was more press freedom in Vietnam back during the Vietnam War as western reporters could travel anywhere and report their findings without censure or fear. The American media doesn’t seem to be interested in this topic today.

    What a tragedy that America has abandoned our former allies in the Vietnam War a second time. Now the US has the leverage to force the Vietnamese government to treat the Montagnards better but it remains silent when Hanoi glosses over their draconian human rights record in their bid for entrance into the WTO."

    "Those Vietnam Veterans who fought the war along side the South Vietnamese and the Montagnards received the scorn of the American left who sang praises for Uncle Ho and his communist cadres who were going to introduce the new socialist paradise on earth. But then, the holocaust that unraveled in Southeast Asia after the American military left, had been simply too painful for the left in America to face, for if they honestly examined it, they might find themselves guilty by their tacit support for the perpetrators of the killing fields in Cambodia, the reeducation camps in Vietnam, and the genocide of the ethnic hill tribes that continues today."

    "t seems the Socialist Republic of Vietnam still owns the hearts and minds of the dominant media culture in America. By their ongoing silence that has lasted for over 30 years, they continue to ignore the ongoing genocide in Southeast Asia of our former allies and swallow the communist doublespeak as to the human rights violation there.

    But if one were ever to stray off the tourist path in Cambodia and Vietnam like I have, it’s easy to discover that, “The Montagnards are hunted down like animals and sold back to the Vietnamese communist government, and the rest of the world doesn’t give a damn.”



    https://cih07.wordpress.com/2007/02/...s-in-cambodia/
    Hos 4:6 My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge. Because you have rejected knowledge, I will also reject you, that you may be no priest to me. Because you have forgotten your God’s law, I will also forget your children.


    "You've got to Stand for Something or You'll fall for anything" (A. Tippin)


    Mat_15:24 But he answered, “I wasn’t sent to anyone but the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”

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