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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
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    East Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artietech View Post
    My jurisdiction goes by the International Energy Code of 2012 or 2017. In that standard, all new air moving systems, whether residential or commercial shall be sealed. This has to be verified by a third party, independent of the installing contractor. In order to be able to do the duct leakage test, you need to be certified by either BPI or RESNET. They test to, 25 Pascals of pressure using a duct blaster or equivalent type device. I do not recall the allowable leakage rate, I am not certified yet...
    They require that in Tyler ? I am in Longview.
    TACLB16522C

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tyler, Tx
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timber View Post
    They require that in Tyler ? I am in Longview.
    From Tim Johnson, Chief Building inspector for Tyler,
    "The duct leakage testing is covered in the Energy code.In the City of Tyler the tests have to be done by a third party inspector.
    We require the test documents to be sent to our office by the inspector."

    New construction and they have even requested it done on some change outs as well.
    Philippians 4:13
    I can do all things in him that strengthen me.
    Apostle Paul inspired by GOD.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
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    Thread Starter
    Artietech does the code include acceptable duct leak test methods? I don't do them any more but am curious about how you can get reliable results from such low pressure systems.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tyler, Tx
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    fe_Nelson_30.5_SO-13_hrFNL.pdf

    I am still learning all this myself, the above article does a decent job explaining, check out the The Energy Conservatory website: look under support, they have a lot resources their.
    Maybe someone else on this forum has the answer?

    https://energyconservatory.com/



    Quote Originally Posted by WAYNE3298 View Post
    Artietech does the code include acceptable duct leak test methods? I don't do them any more but am curious about how you can get reliable results from such low pressure systems.
    Philippians 4:13
    I can do all things in him that strengthen me.
    Apostle Paul inspired by GOD.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tyler, Tx
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    With the right duct blaster, you can do the residential test, but as far as what test standard to use, I am still looking into that. The Minneapolis Duct blaster has interchangeable rings to be able to test low leakage systems, you can even use it to do blower door test for envelope leakage on tighter homes.
    Philippians 4:13
    I can do all things in him that strengthen me.
    Apostle Paul inspired by GOD.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
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    Thread Starter
    I looked at the TEC duct blaster and it looks good. The biggest problem I see with the way they indicate it is used is that the AHU leakage becomes part of the test. Not that it is bad but opens the door for finger pointing if the test fails. They don't indicate the test pressure range of the blower or typical required test pressures. The test method shown (taping off the registers) requires that the registers be sealed. SMACNA duct leak tests only require a representative sample of duct to be leak tested and if it passes no further tests are required as long as the method of sealing the duct is consistent. What I have seen so far indicates that residential duct leak testing is a lot different than commercial. I think verified sealing of the ducts should be required but at the very low pressures in residential I think the cost of duct leak testing outweighs the benefits. Just my opinion.
    Thanks for the input guys.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tyler, Tx
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    I met a guy at a conference who does the testing. He charges 150 per hour, stays on the job with the crew so they can seal and test for pass. Now this is part of his home energy business, coupled with the blower door and weatherization testing, a lot of it is subsidized by the local utilities and your tax dollars. From what I can see, if the initial installers do a good install, the test takes longer to set up than to run it. But it is designed to ensure the installs get done to code.
    Philippians 4:13
    I can do all things in him that strengthen me.
    Apostle Paul inspired by GOD.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
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    Thread Starter
    I had so many commercial leak tests fail I started renting the equipment to the contractor. I showed them how to run the test and let them do preliminary testing until it passed. I then went back and ran the certified test. When I ran the initial test and it failed the contractors didn't want to believe it. They tried everything they could think of to prove me wrong including claiming I used the wrong blower. None of them ever won the argument but I got tired of the hassle.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

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