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  1. #1
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    EU SEER <=> US SEER?

    Hello

    I wonder why AC in Europe has so much different SEER ratings compared to US? E.g. most of simple inverter units sold in the US are nowadays 19 SEER, however in Europe the average SEER rating is somewhere around 6 - 6.5. At least it is given as "SEER".

    Is there another meaning of SEER in US and EU? They really say "SEER" not EER or alike. e.g.

    https://www.breeze24.com/klimaanlage...t-gwh-09-tb3-0

    I can't believe they mean US 8.5 SEER. Can someone resolve the discrepancy?

  2. #2
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    Jun 2019
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    I am exactly looking for the same answer but I guess it differs from country to country. For example, Indians uses ISEER value instead of SEER to rate their inverter air conditioner units. So I think if there is a major weather change between the two countries, these two values should be different.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    The biggest reason for the difference is units of measure. For cooling, USA values are in EER (Btu/W), while Europe uses COP (W/W). To convert from a COP value to an EER value, multiply by 3.412. Do that and you will see that the values are similar. For heating, both the USA and Europe use COP, so there is no conversion needed.

    The European and USA test points are somewhat different, so you if you tested the same unit to the different procedures you would get slightly different results. European test points reflect the generally colder temperatures in Europe, while the Indian ISEER tests at higher points and gives more weight to the higher temperatures than in the USA or Europe.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by coolcoil View Post
    The biggest reason for the difference is units of measure. For cooling, USA values are in EER (Btu/W), while Europe uses COP (W/W). To convert from a COP value to an EER value, multiply by 3.412. Do that and you will see that the values are similar. For heating, both the USA and Europe use COP, so there is no conversion needed.

    The European and USA test points are somewhat different, so you if you tested the same unit to the different procedures you would get slightly different results. European test points reflect the generally colder temperatures in Europe, while the Indian ISEER tests at higher points and gives more weight to the higher temperatures than in the USA or Europe.
    Didn't understand the logic. The scientific definition is same all over the world. Why in India it is going to be different with different interpretation?
    SEER and EER are different they both are not the same. SEER means SEASONAL energy efficiency rating. Like it varies in different climates and seasons.

    EER is the Energy Efficiency Ratio that is standard and set. The humidity levels and temperatures are different so the SEER rating is different as well in U.S ans Europe. You wont find any discrepancy in EER as it is set.

  5. #5
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    EER is the Energy Efficiency Ratio at a defined condition. This is the definition of EER from AHRI 340/360: Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER).A ratio of the Cooling Capacity in Btu/h to the power input values in watts at any given set of Rating Conditions, expressed in Btu/Wh.

    Link to AHRI free download: http://www.ahrinet.org/App_Content/a...0_I-P_2019.pdf

    For split-system and packaged units the conditions that must be set are these:

    1. Outdoor air temperature (usually dry bulb only).
    2. Return air conditions (both dry and wet bulb temperature).
    3. Unit external static pressure.

    In the USA, most standards and regulations typically define Full-Load EER as 95 degF outdoor air, 80/67 return air, and the external static pressure varies with the size of the unit. I believe this is what you are thinking of.

    But standards like AHRI 210/240 and AHRI 340/360 define EER at multiple conditions. For example, there are four EER conditions defined for the tests used to calculate IEER:



    And these are the conditions:


    European ratings can look different for two reasons:

    1. If they use the term EER, it is defined as W/W (watts of heat/watts of electricity in) instead of Btu/Wh. Though they usually use the term Coefficient of Performance (COP) instead. COP and EER mean exactly the same thing. For some reason in the USA we use the term COP and units of W/W to measure heat pump heating performance.

    2. The typical European conditions for Full-Load EER (or COP) are a little different because they use degrees Celsius. For outdoor air, 35 degC = 95 degF, so that is the same. But they round the indoor conditions to the nearest whole number - entering indoor dry bulb /wet bulb of 27/19 degC works out to 80.6/66.2 degF.

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