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  1. #1
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    Does Everyone Need A College Degree

    The political view now appears to me to be that everyone should go to college and get at least a BS degree. I don't agree. It is my opinion that it depends on what profession you want to be a part of. Opinions here should be a good cross section because we have people with all levels and types of formal and informal education.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

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  3. #2
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    If everyone had a degree..they would become less valuable.. wages would go down in many professions... Some degrees would become worthless as a degree isn't needed for many jobs.. and those jobs still need to be done anyway..
    ...

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  5. #3
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    A lot of degrees Missouri Guy are not marketable which in my opinion makes them worthless.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

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  7. #4
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    Absolutely not.

    I'm not anti-college in any way, I made sure my daughter got a good education. But college isn't for everyone, and many high paying jobs require skills you typically don't get from college.

    Here in Georgia, having a state sponsored scholarship program has turned colleges into businesses that just run people in one end and out the other, and many of the degrees they give are worthless for anything other than looking pretty hanging on the wall. I know countless young people with college degrees who are waiting tables, and the income potential is not there to pay back their student loans for 75-100 thousand dollars.

    All the while, the trade industries are starving for qualified personnel, and the income potential in those industries is higher than what most college grades are making.

    We need to step back and rethink this whole thing. And IMO, we also need to put vocational education back into schools.

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  9. #5
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    I agree that whether or not a college degree is a necessity depends on what your future plans are. The problem is a lot of young people don't really have a professional goal. There are plenty of jobs & opportunities that are not available without a college degree so IMO its always a good idea to get a college education if you're not sure what you want to do at the young age of completing high school. I encouraged all my kids to go to college & none of them knew what they wanted to do with their life at the time. For two of them college ended up being a necessity to further their careers & for one it wasn't necessary, but I never consider it time or money wasted. So I don't think everyone should go to college but everyone should be aware that it might add possibilities for a career that might later arise.
    Gary
    -----------
    http://www.oceanhvac.com
    The best things in life are free but not everyone is willing to pay the price.

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  11. #6
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    Sending your kids to college today means (at many colleges) sending them to Liberal Brainwash Academy. My kids are grown, but if they were that age, there's no way I'd pay for them to go to a snowflake school. They could choose, but I'd have veto power.

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  13. #7
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    Like most here I don't believe everyone should go to college. I will say that many local community colleges that teach trades such as HVAC, Welding, CNC machining, etc. are not being utilized enough. Instead of high school counselors and parents telling kids they need a B.S. degree to be successful, they should be more honest and tell students about how a job in the trades can be financially rewarding, fulfilling, and that those jobs are in demand. They should also be honest about how competitive it is to find a white-collar job right out of school whereas many employers are begging for people to get into the trades.

  14. #8
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    Degrees are not necessary for success nor are many of them worth their cost in time, effort and dollars. Not bragging here, just want to share my personal degree experience. I first went to trade school and earned two Associate in Science degrees. Took three years. Basically, it was hvac and electronics trade school.

    After several years in the field I went to the university part time while working as an hvac tech and earned my BA degree and state teaching license. Not too long ago I completed my M.Ed degree with my company paying the tuition or I would not have done it.

    Know which of all of these has the most personal value to me? My time in trade school. I learned more from my trade school instructors than the university professors. Way More! I not only learned the trade and some electronics, I learned how to think rationally, troubleshoot and think logically. I learned how to reason out the actual cause of a problem.

    So much so, that I found myself disagreeing with what I was taught at the university. Yup, it was socialistic, Marxist and even anti-American crap most of the time. The worst university department is the English department, followed by the rest, including history (which is not actually taught in history class anymore), psychology and the list goes on.

    From my perspective the only degrees of value these days are engineering degrees. Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Physics degrees are still worth the time, effort and expense.

    So, my master's degree is in education. For the most part is was a waste. Hate to admit it but, it was mostly a waste. I was fed liberal trash about how to learn and how to teach. But, the piece of paper was paid for by my company and they honor it and it got me a slight raise and a little more respect at work.

    Trade or technical school, I highly recommend. Given that, I would hope anyone going to trade school get the benefit of good instructors. Even hvac school quality varies a great deal. I will not open the union apprenticeship program can of worms. I have a unique opinion (a first hand opinion) of union apprenticeship.
    "No matter how thirsty your imagination, mirages contain no water"

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  16. #9
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    Thread Starter
    Excellent post Hugh.

    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

  17. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh B View Post
    Degrees are not necessary for success nor are many of them worth their cost in time, effort and dollars. Not bragging here, just want to share my personal degree experience. I first went to trade school and earned two Associate in Science degrees. Took three years. Basically, it was hvac and electronics trade school.

    After several years in the field I went to the university part time while working as an hvac tech and earned my BA degree and state teaching license. Not too long ago I completed my M.Ed degree with my company paying the tuition or I would not have done it.

    Know which of all of these has the most personal value to me? My time in trade school. I learned more from my trade school instructors than the university professors. Way More! I not only learned the trade and some electronics, I learned how to think rationally, troubleshoot and think logically. I learned how to reason out the actual cause of a problem.

    So much so, that I found myself disagreeing with what I was taught at the university. Yup, it was socialistic, Marxist and even anti-American crap most of the time. The worst university department is the English department, followed by the rest, including history (which is not actually taught in history class anymore), psychology and the list goes on.

    From my perspective the only degrees of value these days are engineering degrees. Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Physics degrees are still worth the time, effort and expense.

    So, my master's degree is in education. For the most part is was a waste. Hate to admit it but, it was mostly a waste. I was fed liberal trash about how to learn and how to teach. But, the piece of paper was paid for by my company and they honor it and it got me a slight raise and a little more respect at work.

    Trade or technical school, I highly recommend. Given that, I would hope anyone going to trade school get the benefit of good instructors. Even hvac school quality varies a great deal. I will not open the union apprenticeship program can of worms. I have a unique opinion (a first hand opinion) of union apprenticeship.
    Why do you think an engineering degree is worthwhile?

  18. #11
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    I enjoyed my time in university and the degree got me a job I ended up hating which is how I got into HVAC the long and expensive way around. There is nothing inherently wrong with university and higher education in general what people get wrong is why they are going in the first place. It used to be that you would go on your way to becoming a doctor or lawyer or something respectable like that or maybe you wanted a liberal arts education to further your own learning. Now people are going because they have to have post-secondary of some kind to get an entry level position paying $11.25/hour. I remember a couple of years ago I saw a job posting for a local store that sell curtains and they wanted a university degree. Not any particular degree. Just a degree. So some poor kid has spent four years and tens of thousands of dollars just so they can get a crack at a coveted job selling blinds and curtains for minimum wage. Proving that with the demand for college education comes a dilution of its actual value.

  19. #12
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    An engineering degree is highly marketable. It is based in fundamentals and fundamentals are the key to a successful thought process.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

  20. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sooty View Post
    I enjoyed my time in university and the degree got me a job I ended up hating which is how I got into HVAC the long and expensive way around. There is nothing inherently wrong with university and higher education in general what people get wrong is why they are going in the first place. It used to be that you would go on your way to becoming a doctor or lawyer or something respectable like that or maybe you wanted a liberal arts education to further your own learning. Now people are going because they have to have post-secondary of some kind to get an entry level position paying $11.25/hour. I remember a couple of years ago I saw a job posting for a local store that sell curtains and they wanted a university degree. Not any particular degree. Just a degree. So some poor kid has spent four years and tens of thousands of dollars just so they can get a crack at a coveted job selling blinds and curtains for minimum wage. Proving that with the demand for college education comes a dilution of its actual value.
    More likely the firm selling blinds and curtains learned the high school grads of today can't make change, hold an intelligent conversation or even begin to commit themselves to come to work regularly or on time. At least a college graduate stayed with four years of study and perhaps can actually learn how to sell and size blinds as well as make change when paid in cash.
    "No matter how thirsty your imagination, mirages contain no water"

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