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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    how high can the liquid line travel?

    The liquid line pressure is created by the compressor, correct? Then in theory, what is the maximum length the hot refrigerant liquid can travel vertically before lose pressure and vaporize? For example, if you live in the 10th floor, can you install the condenser unit at the 1st floor?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Arrowhead Stadium
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    1,227
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    Every manufacturer has different charts for how long, and how high the lines can be ran and various line sizes with how much pressure drop is created.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil, EC
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    If you look up the density of the refrigerant (lb/cu ft) and divide by 144 sq in / sq ft you will get the pressure drop per foot of height of liquid. Using your PT chart, find the pressure difference between your saturated condensing temperature and the saturated pressure corresponding to the liquid temperature leaving the condensing unit...ie, the amount of subcooling. Divide the result by the psi per foot you calculated and that will be the height above the unit where the subcooling equals zero.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil, EC
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    For a 100 ft building, use the same psi/ft figure to calculate what the pressure drop would be for a 100 ft rise, then go to your PT chart to determine how much additional subcooling you would need just to overcome the height.

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