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  1. #40
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    Feb 2016
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    Louisburg Kansas
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    The important thing about the flange is the break strongly indicates the direction of the catastrophic force was tangential to the pipe and was generated from inside the pipe. That indicates the allowable hoop stress was exceeded. I have never seen hoop stress generated by the pump or even in a steam pipe high enough to cause failure in a piping system that was properly selected according to the temperature/pressure relationship. Considering what the piping is for and the size of the flanges it is almost certainly suitable for 125Lb or 150 Lb service. The length of the pipe that ruptured is a lot longer than the outlet pipe that did not rupture. That says without doubt that the pipe that ruptured is a lot more flexible than the one that didn't. That eliminates operating stress due to thermal. The flange break at the top couldn't have been caused by an upward force because it is obvious there is no upward force. There is a little more that can be said but I think that substantiates that my opinion is not pure speculation.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

  2. #41
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
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    Pahrump, NV
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    By the marking on the part in one picture, it looks like a 5” 125lb service strainer. All of the bolt heads look like they are rotated out.

    I can certainly envision the hoop stress component.
    It's an upside down world we live in.

  3. #42
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    Feb 2016
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    Louisburg Kansas
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    David as a rule if you have read my posts I think you will agree I try to keep technical explanations to an absolute minimum because that's not what this site is all about. Not saying the site isn't technical because it is but it is not geared as an engineering site. If my posts here sounded too technical and arrogant to some of you I apologize. I don't mind being questioned or even challenged but it can be done in a non-aggressive manner. When someone starts out throwing boulders (not rocks) I will either ignore them or respond in kind. David whether you agree or disagree you approached this in a civil manner and that contributes to the discussion.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Sunny SoCal
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    It's hard to assess something like this without being there.
    Plenty of speculation so I'll add my .02’

    Freezing looks to me to be the most plausible cause for this damage but what if the chiller was drained as stated?

    I'm thinking that the piping still had sufficient amount of water to cause this sequence of events.

    First the pipes froze.
    There was nothing downstream of the valve to back it up (pressure wise) so it popped out like a freeze plug.

    The next thaw allowed water to travel into the chiller or at least head that direction.
    When the next cold snap hit the now flooded strainer popped.

    Piping misalignment MAY have been a contributing factor to the strainers demise but not the main cause as two components failed & the valve (butterfly) doesn't know/care about alignment.

    From the images I'm guessing that the unit is not lagged down to the slab.
    I would anchor it down before I made any piping repairs.
    I'm not saying that's why it failed, just good practice IMO.

    The rust on the exterior of the piping/bolts could have formed long ago due to cold/condensation.
    Eric

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