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  1. #40
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Wa
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    440
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    Quote Originally Posted by philzito View Post
    I referred to people who didn't know how things worked yet still trying to manipulate said things as idiots.

    If you don't know a damper needs to be open but yet choose to operate a system that makes you an idiot.
    Ok your right! Their idiots! LOL

  2. #41
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Posts
    12
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by philzito View Post
    Go for the instant gratification. Anything you need to know about HVAC can be learned in the field. Your opportunity cost of staying in the apprenticeship vs getting into the controls world is too high (meaning the cashflow and salary growth you will lose staying not going into BAS is more then you will make if you start BAS now).

    Plus, if your goal is BAS anyways why not start now?

    I've met to many mechanical guys (from trade schools and apprenticeships) who thought they knew how systems worked but when they actually had to control multiple systems they didn't.

    You don't need to know anything about changing compressors, TXV's, scrubbing tubes etc. That will help you absolutely zero in controls.

    The reality is enter controls now. Make the salary. Identify your gaps, study to close those gaps in the off hours and be making 60k to 80k by year 3 in controls if your average.
    Someone i work with has also given me this same advice. My guts telling me to go straight into the BAS field but my brains telling me to complete the HVACR apprenticeship first. When the next BAS opportunity comes along I think ill just flip a coin.

    By the way, would doing the Building Automation Systems A to Z first be a waste of time if i plan on doing the Building Automation Fundamentals Course right after? Is much of whats in the A to Z already covered in the Fundamentals?

  3. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Queensland
    Posts
    209
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    For some self help learning;

    Phil Zito's podcasts are good.
    Schneider has a good online university that anyone can join.
    The famous Honeywell grey book is a must.
    Practical Controls: a Guide to Mechanical Systems is one of my favorites.
    Learn the IT stuff - how IP works, network design & engineering, API's, etc. etc.
    Study the various protocols & field buses. RS485 will be around for ages yet.

    Personally I went from HVAC-R to Controls. I got interested in controls early on, however it took me a long time to break into controls for various reasons. I do not regret my time in mechanical at all, and agree with others who've said it pays big time to understand from practical experience what the systems are meant to be doing. Nonetheless it may be beneficial to jump into controls ASAP. I made the move later in life (as many old fridgies do!) & had a LOT to learn. Still seems like I have lots more to learn actually. That's the great (and sometimes infuriating!) thing with controls, there is always something new to learn.
    In my opinion if it's the career you've set your heart on, then go for it. The earlier you can get a start, the sooner you'll reap the rewards. And maybe you'll end up as the old guy everyone listens to.

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    314
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    Kanes -

    The best training is to read the HVAC mech & controls books and do the actual work. Sorry, but reading is one your own time. Get you hands on the Honeywell "Grey Book"- can't go wrong there. Realize your dealing with, what I call the 'paper engineers' and you need to be the 'field engineer/tech" - be the 'pro' as best you can. And being the 'best' means you're going to make mistakes (oh, the joy of flodding a CT). Respect the 'paper engineers' - to a point - like the other thread said 'they know the computers, but not the equipment. And they do make goofs.

    See attached "HVAC Exam & Answers" - interview quiz to hire potential DDC tech. It goes back to 'DOS' days, but besides that the info is solid.
    If you would post your email I'd be happy to send you more DDC material.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Posts
    12
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by FreezerGeezer View Post
    For some self help learning;

    Phil Zito's podcasts are good.
    Schneider has a good online university that anyone can join.
    The famous Honeywell grey book is a must.
    Practical Controls: a Guide to Mechanical Systems is one of my favorites.
    Learn the IT stuff - how IP works, network design & engineering, API's, etc. etc.
    Study the various protocols & field buses. RS485 will be around for ages yet.

    Personally I went from HVAC-R to Controls. I got interested in controls early on, however it took me a long time to break into controls for various reasons. I do not regret my time in mechanical at all, and agree with others who've said it pays big time to understand from practical experience what the systems are meant to be doing. Nonetheless it may be beneficial to jump into controls ASAP. I made the move later in life (as many old fridgies do!) & had a LOT to learn. Still seems like I have lots more to learn actually. That's the great (and sometimes infuriating!) thing with controls, there is always something new to learn.
    In my opinion if it's the career you've set your heart on, then go for it. The earlier you can get a start, the sooner you'll reap the rewards. And maybe you'll end up as the old guy everyone listens to.
    Thanks a lot for the tips and references mate!

    Quote Originally Posted by tridiumtech View Post
    Kanes -

    The best training is to read the HVAC mech & controls books and do the actual work. Sorry, but reading is one your own time. Get you hands on the Honeywell "Grey Book"- can't go wrong there. Realize your dealing with, what I call the 'paper engineers' and you need to be the 'field engineer/tech" - be the 'pro' as best you can. And being the 'best' means you're going to make mistakes (oh, the joy of flodding a CT). Respect the 'paper engineers' - to a point - like the other thread said 'they know the computers, but not the equipment. And they do make goofs.

    See attached "HVAC Exam & Answers" - interview quiz to hire potential DDC tech. It goes back to 'DOS' days, but besides that the info is solid.
    If you would post your email I'd be happy to send you more DDC material.
    Cheers, that interview quiz will be very helpful! I just sent you an email.

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