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  1. #27
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    Mar 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    Wouldn't hurt to reach out to prospective employers right now. For what it's worth, they do not need to be advertising for help. You seek out the commercial contractors. You put the bug in their brain, and they'll keep wishing you were there right now. You seek them out, let them know your qualifications, and chances are you'll have more employment opportunities than you know what to do with. Just sayin'

    Another interesting thing about commercial, you probably want to stay away from refrigeration.

    I encourage any youngster getting into the trade to get into refrigeration. Because of the learning curve. But when we get older, those late night service calls are not good for our health. At least for the long term.
    Thank you for the advice. What you are saying does make sense.

  2. #28
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    May 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fender60 View Post
    Thank you for the advice. What you are saying does make sense.
    By the way, in my mind I am still a child, but my body says otherwise. LOL.
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

  3. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    By the way, in my mind I am still a child, but my body says otherwise. LOL.
    I can relate to that for sure.

  4. #30
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    Aug 2008
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    Hibbing, MN
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    Wouldn't the community college already have a 'program' in place? Or will you need to start from scratch?
    They have a program in place, but it needs some revamping in my opinion. For example, in our neck of the woods, we have very few fuel oil furnaces, but the program devotes 3 credits to fuel oil. Same as electrical. I think electrical should be increased and fuel oil should be almost eliminated. Maybe spend a couple of days on fuel oil. There are some other tweaks that should be made as well.
    If God didn't want us to eat animals... He wouldn't have made them out of MEAT.

  5. #31
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    May 2004
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    Salt Lake City/Tooele
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    If you truly love the trade and do nothing but dream about it, think about it, and talk about it, then you will have no trouble teaching about it. Anything less and you are wasting your's and your student's time.
    I teach school. I love it. I love every moment of it. I take the syllabus, books, and curriculum and throw it all in the garbage. I demand they bring their meter and tools in and meet me in the lab. We spend night after night in that lab going over sequence of operations, troubleshooting procedures, and anything I can think of to simulate real world hell. The guys know that cell phones are a HUGE no-no. Only place for a cell phone in class is when I allow it to use the Googler to find a pdf file or particular apps to assist them, like PT charts.
    I have yet to loose a student and I hope never will, only time a student has bowed out was due to financial reasons. Students will feed on your enthusiasm and love for the trade and they will go from nothing to something.

  6. #32
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    Aug 2008
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    Hibbing, MN
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by slctech View Post
    If you truly love the trade and do nothing but dream about it, think about it, and talk about it, then you will have no trouble teaching about it. Anything less and you are wasting your's and your student's time.
    I teach school. I love it. I love every moment of it. I take the syllabus, books, and curriculum and throw it all in the garbage. I demand they bring their meter and tools in and meet me in the lab. We spend night after night in that lab going over sequence of operations, troubleshooting procedures, and anything I can think of to simulate real world hell. The guys know that cell phones are a HUGE no-no. Only place for a cell phone in class is when I allow it to use the Googler to find a pdf file or particular apps to assist them, like PT charts.
    I have yet to loose a student and I hope never will, only time a student has bowed out was due to financial reasons. Students will feed on your enthusiasm and love for the trade and they will go from nothing to something.
    Thanks for the post. This is how I feel as well. I love this trade and did most of my learning hands on. Back in 1989, I bought a refrigeration company with the promise of training by the previous owner. That training consisted of about a week and then he moved on.

    “Modern Heating Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning” became my Bible along with manufacturers service manuals. I went to Copeland’s compressor operations class, and made a lot of calls to tech support. I had customers calling, and I didn’t have much of a clue. But, I made sure that every call was completed, and done right. In the beginning, I gave a lot of free hours and a few price reductions, but I considered it like paying for school.

    To this day, I still read service manuals, attend industry training, participate in RSES, and read and respond to posts in this forum. It’s amazing how much I don’t know after 30 years!
    If God didn't want us to eat animals... He wouldn't have made them out of MEAT.

  7. #33
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    May 2014
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    Bay Area California
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    When I was beginning in the trade, I did the same, for much the same reason. I was being way over paid. So when I was doing something 'new' and it took me 6 hours, yet I knew it would only take me 4 hours to do that same job again or the next time, I only billed my employer 4 hours.

    If I was helping on an install, or doing something like changing filters, then I billed for all of the time. Worked out great for me, I've built a great career for myself.


    Quote Originally Posted by GenesisRefrig View Post
    Thanks for the post. This is how I feel as well. I love this trade and did most of my learning hands on. Back in 1989, I bought a refrigeration company with the promise of training by the previous owner. That training consisted of about a week and then he moved on.

    “Modern Heating Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning” became my Bible along with manufacturers service manuals. I went to Copeland’s compressor operations class, and made a lot of calls to tech support. I had customers calling, and I didn’t have much of a clue. But, I made sure that every call was completed, and done right. In the beginning, I gave a lot of free hours and a few price reductions, but I considered it like paying for school.

    To this day, I still read service manuals, attend industry training, participate in RSES, and read and respond to posts in this forum. It’s amazing how much I don’t know after 30 years!
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tucson, Az
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    I left my full time job at the end of January. Accepted an offer to teach in the HVAC program at the local community college. Also gearing up to go out on my own. Have Commercial and Residential contractors licenses.

    Still adjusting to the college scenario but really enjoy helping the students.
    Jim
    Tucson, Az
    Keeping the Ice Cream Frozen!

  9. #35
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    Aug 2008
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    Hibbing, MN
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    Thread Starter
    Well, just an update. I guess I’m not qualified to fill the position. The great state of Minnesota requires either a diploma in HVAC or an apprenticeship. I did a two year apprenticeship starting in 1989. They weren’t satisfied with that, even though the man I apprenticed under sent a letter verifying my training. Human Resources said they needed grades from my formal classroom work, and documentation of hours in each skill area.

    I’ve been in the business for 30 years now (where did that time go?), I’ve also taught public school for the past 15 years. I guess some kid with a two year diploma is more qualified.

    What’s really ironic is that the college hired us to put A/C in their dorms last year.

    Oh well, it’s not to be. Sad, I think I could have done some good for our trade.
    If God didn't want us to eat animals... He wouldn't have made them out of MEAT.

  10. #36
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    Jan 2015
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    Iowa
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    I don't ever remember getting a grade for any class in my apprenticeship. It was either pass or fail. Again that was 30+ years ago too

  11. #37
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    Mar 2018
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    Sumter, SC
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    Quote Originally Posted by GenesisRefrig View Post
    Well, just an update. I guess I’m not qualified to fill the position. The great state of Minnesota requires either a diploma in HVAC or an apprenticeship. I did a two year apprenticeship starting in 1989. They weren’t satisfied with that, even though the man I apprenticed under sent a letter verifying my training. Human Resources said they needed grades from my formal classroom work, and documentation of hours in each skill area.

    I’ve been in the business for 30 years now (where did that time go?), I’ve also taught public school for the past 15 years. I guess some kid with a two year diploma is more qualified.

    What’s really ironic is that the college hired us to put A/C in their dorms last year.

    Oh well, it’s not to be. Sad, I think I could have done some good for our trade.
    I find this very sad for all. How very short sighted of the college to discount your experience and training like that. SMH


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  12. #38
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    May 2014
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    My sentiment's mirror Fender's. The vast majority of colleges and universities are no longer about true education.

    When I went to the trade school in AZ, pretty sure all instructors had some experience. Some instructors had a career of experience, others probably had minimal. I remember one instructor, pretty young guy, probably minimal experience; but he did have SOME experience, and he could pass the good and bad along with the prescribed curriculum. The fact he had a wife and baby on the way may have given him motivation to seek a more secure job and benefits in teaching.
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

  13. #39
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    Oct 2008
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    In a kitchen with my head stuck in an oven
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    Quote Originally Posted by GenesisRefrig View Post
    Well, just an update. I guess I’m not qualified to fill the position. The great state of Minnesota requires either a diploma in HVAC or an apprenticeship. I did a two year apprenticeship starting in 1989. They weren’t satisfied with that, even though the man I apprenticed under sent a letter verifying my training. Human Resources said they needed grades from my formal classroom work, and documentation of hours in each skill area.

    I’ve been in the business for 30 years now (where did that time go?), I’ve also taught public school for the past 15 years. I guess some kid with a two year diploma is more qualified.

    What’s really ironic is that the college hired us to put A/C in their dorms last year.

    Oh well, it’s not to be. Sad, I think I could have done some good for our trade.
    Well CRAP! I'm sorry to hear that. I was progressing through this thread with some hope that you'd fulfill your passions by combining your two areas of expertise.

    Teaching gets into your blood once you've done it. I did it as an instructor in the military some thirty years ago, teaching my trade of that time. That period was my favorite of all the occupations I've had since I left the nest over forty years ago.
    ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° °

    "You never know what others don't know." -

    If I can't laugh at myself...then I'll laugh at YOU! -

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