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  1. #1
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    Bipolar 2400 vs iWave vs UV lights - which is best for mold reduction?

    Hi All,

    I'm in the process of healing from Lyme disease. I just moved out of a very moldy home where the mold was suppressing my immune system. Now I'm in a two year old building where mold counts are very low and everything appears to be spotless. The next part of this journey is keeping it that way.

    I want to keep the HVAC system as clean and mold free as possible. It's a small system. Some have recommended the Air Oasis Bipolar 2400 along with electrostatic filters. Others have recommended the iWave. Others have said those products are snake oil, and I should just use UV lights. Others have said none of these work, and I should just keep humidity low.

    What do you recommend?

    Thank you,

    Aaron
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  2. #2
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    I"ve been investigating air cleaning technologies for VOC reduction for a couple of years now. It's been quite a ride.
    Although your concern are biologicals, not VOCs, I do have some suggestions.

    Most, but not all, IAQ issues can be divided between what's called particulates and VOCs. Particulates generally are larger than .001 microns, most larger than .01 microns. VOCs (and other molecular substances) are at least an order of magnitude smaller. HEPA can trap most particulates (including biologicals) but won't kill biologicals.

    I've learned to trust independent science research available in unbiased publications. I've come across too many companies that misrepresent *sciencey* sounding presentations to promote their products.

    I start by reviewing this ASHRAE paper : ASHRAE Position Document onFiltration and Air Cleaning.
    It's available here: https://www.ashrae.org/File%20Librar...leaning-PD.PDF
    Section 2.4 review UV to treat biologicals.

    From what I"ve seen UV seems to most researched approach. Other methods may work but I don't think the evidence is as strong. Beware of PR spin masquerading as science.
    When researching companies call and ask to talk to their technical experts. Ask questions and request data. If they provide technical sources review the information in detail. Often time technical data is provided that is misleading. Get their opinions on competitors. Call their competitors and ask the same questions. Post your impressions here.

    Here's a company I'd recommend:
    https://www.steril-aire.com/

    Here's the credentials of their president
    https://www.steril-aire.com/info-center/ask-dr-bob/

    I've spoken to this guy and he knows his stuff. Give him a call and get his opinions on some the alternate technologies you mentioned.
    It's rare to find real scientist running these companies. He's probably one of the most credentials sources I know of.

    Whatever you do keep your humidity below 50RH.

    I'm be interested in how your investigation goes. Let us know your impressions.

  3. #3
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    Thread Starter
    Thank you for your time and feedback, I really appreciate. I had been leaning towards the UV light since it had the most votes from all the folks I have spoken to so far. I did call Dr. Bob. He was not there, but Jeff was. He talked about the issues with ozone and how those products I was looking at pumped it into the air.

    I do have two Intellipure air purifiers for inside the apartment. I will most likely go with the Steril-Aire UV light and better filters than what I have on there now. I had expressed concerns about the bulb not doing any killing on the back side of the coil. He said there's is strong enough to burn through the coil. Hope that's true.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by aresni200 View Post
    Thank you for your time and feedback, I really appreciate. I had been leaning towards the UV light since it had the most votes from all the folks I have spoken to so far. I did call Dr. Bob. He was not there, but Jeff was. He talked about the issues with ozone and how those products I was looking at pumped it into the air.

    I do have two Intellipure air purifiers for inside the apartment. I will most likely go with the Steril-Aire UV light and better filters than what I have on there now. I had expressed concerns about the bulb not doing any killing on the back side of the coil. He said there's is strong enough to burn through the coil. Hope that's true.
    glad you found a course of action.

    Just read the specs on the Intellipure - Quite impressive!! Best advertised specs I've seen for particulates.

    FYI - I don't believe the GPS devices emit ozone. the other devices you mentioned might.

  5. #5
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    The Inteillipure units are beastly (better be for almost 1k each). I have a particle counter which read in the mid 500's in the old room I used to live in. The air coming out of the Intellipure was 0 for both small and large particles. On the lowest setting it's perfect white noise. On high you cannot hear the TV.

    I think I'm going to stick with the light and pleated filters for now. The Bipolar 2400 and iWave look interesting, but there seems to be no credible studies. Also Jeff said they are emitting ozone which will not help and can be harmful in many cases.

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    What about ionization?

    The UV light being able to burn through the coils sounds dangerous. I have read that UV can damage coils, however I would like to put mine under the coils when I get it. Is there any truth to this and should I avoid putting it there. ( I want to keep them clean)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevinyork View Post
    What about ionization?

    The UV light being able to burn through the coils sounds dangerous. I have read that UV can damage coils, however I would like to put mine under the coils when I get it. Is there any truth to this and should I avoid putting it there. ( I want to keep them clean)
    UVC doesn't literally burn through coils, it destroy biologicals living on coils -kills em dead.
    No harm to your coil.

  8. #8
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    To keep the HVAC system mold-free, most of your concern should be in the air handling unit and in the supply ductwork. These are areas where there is condensation and high relative humidity-- mold needs moisture to grow. It's always good to start with a good pleated filter that is well sealed in the rack. Filters help remove the organic food (dust) that mold will use to grow.

    Installing UVC lights that bathe the coil could also be used. With each of these technologies (including electrostatics and ionizers), that have advantages and disadvantages.

    This is a complex topic that could include discussion of dehumidifiers, equipment sizing, filter pressure drop, MERV ratings, and much more.

    I personally have a well-sealed MERV 13 filter on my system with no other technologies, and I have very clean coils and low mold counts in my home.

  9. #9
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    ASHRAE recommends 30-50% rh for mold and fungi control, ~ 55% best for bacteria and viruses. Static electricity issues <40%.
    UV will not hurt the coils, but may damage plastic drain pans. Paint or use foil tape to protect plastics from direct uv light exposure.
    Make sure bath, dryer and stove exhaust piped to outside, not to attic or craw.
    Metal, sealed duct, no panned returns.
    Correctly sized equipment, air flow matched to static & air flow per mfg tables.
    Make sure electro static or merv filters do not have excessive pressure drop for your unit.
    Test for mold spores & for radon gases after a few months.

    Did not see back-up drain line, have float cut off or sensor, trap /cleanout?

  10. #10
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    Wow, I didn't even know this existed. Something I can add to my business. Thanks guys

    Zuraida of Mold Removal Dayton

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