Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 27 to 36 of 36
  1. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Posts
    7
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by Adlerberts-Protege View Post
    That isnt happening in the real world and you know it. Lets be realistic.
    I am new to all of this but I can't imagine people leaving equipment hooked up overnight at customer site and returning the next day to verify no pressure drop. What are practical times people actually wait when running a pressure test?

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Posts
    7
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by pecmsg View Post
    Any training, classes, online?

    Where did you purchase this unit?

    Its a waste but at least say your certified!
    Yes I have had training. Definitely wouldn't attempt installing these without any knowledge. I took Fujitsu 101 in person class and took a handful of classes on their online portal. I also have my EPA 608 type I and II certificate. I also have a bachelors in mechanical engineering so have had thermodynamics classes etc. None get into these types of specifics but you do learn about refrigeration cycles.
    Unit was purchased from RSD.
    I think I have pinpointed my problem, the vacuum gage I purchased new appears to be defective. I suspected it after my overnight 620psi pressure test with no drop. i felt I should be able to hold vacuum with same setup but vacuum gage in place of pressure gage but couldn't say for sure until I used another vacuum gage. I pulled down to 20 microns and held it under 500 microns through 3 feet of 1/4" tubing for over an hour. As soon as I added my other vacuum gage and tried again it wouldn't hold at all. Damn CPS and their vacuum gages!

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Posts
    7
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by Core_d View Post
    I dont do hardly any if any new installs but, my nitro regulator is factory set at 250psi. Some leaks will show up even better with a lower psi.

    Is um a micron? If thats the case he has a dry leak free system.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Yes um is micron sorry for the confusion. Where I work we use um and micron interchangeably.

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    345
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by shaggs2broke View Post
    This is excellent advice. I just assumed my equipment was good because it is all new. After hooking up appion valve core tool directly off vacuum pump outlet and adding vacuum gage I still couldn't hold vacuum so knew it was either the valve core tool or vacuum gage. Borrowed a different vacuum gage and could hold vacuum after properly pumping down. Lesson learned verify all your equipment regardless of whether it is new or not.
    Good deal shaggs ! Welcome, and hope you grab a chair and stick around.....

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Gladstone, Oregon (Portland)
    Posts
    739
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by shaggs2broke View Post
    I am new to all of this but I can't imagine people leaving equipment hooked up overnight at customer site and returning the next day to verify no pressure drop. What are practical times people actually wait when running a pressure test?
    I already gave the answer. Look. A one man band, who lets the customer know the deal beforehand, can surely leave it pressurized and come back the next day. That is understood.

    But I am a realist. No company with employees in their right mind will do this nor do they do this on 99% of installs. Anyone can come on here and tell me that's wrong or this is wrong or whatever crap they want to preach. I am telling you realistic expectations based off of 25 years installing, servicing, and maintaining equipment. An overnight pressure test just isnt going to happen in order to keep multiple vans moving and profitable.

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Dover, DE
    Posts
    10,217
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by shellkamp View Post
    Rider, where does it say that's OK for a pressure test involving the compressor?

    I already stated the lineset and coils are fine with that pressure.

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
    I looked through every piece of literature I have on Samsung and found no answer to your question.
    Which doesn’t surprise me as their information is directly translated from Korean. Some is written very generically.
    So I emailed tech support. And they confirmed the outdoor units are capable of a 590 PSI standing pressure test.
    This isn’t limited to a specific unit. Or line.
    It’s just not directly noted in their literature.
    On a personal level, I’ve found many leaks myself going north of 500 that otherwise didn’t show up at lower pressures.
    Back in my startup days, if the installer didn’t confirm to the installation instructions, the install was failed and we didn’t return until the pressure test was done per the manual.
    “I haven’t failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” - Thomas Edison

    “It’s not whether you get knocked down, it’s whether you get up.” - Vince Lombardi

    "In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics" - Homer Simpson

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Treasure coast, FL
    Posts
    7,468
    Post Likes
    OK; that's great. Samsung makes a more robust compressor shell than most, in that case.

    Copeland specifically states that 360-ish figure concerning the low-side of the system.

    Alls I'm saying is you gots to be careful.

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Dover, DE
    Posts
    10,217
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by shellkamp View Post
    OK; that's great. Samsung makes a more robust compressor shell than most, in that case.

    Copeland specifically states that 360-ish figure concerning the low-side of the system.

    Alls I'm saying is you gots to be careful.

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
    It’s not *quite* as critical as it used to be. Thankfully the industry seems to be heading away from flair fittings everywhere. VRF wise a lot of the fittings seem to be going to sweat. Which is saving a lot of headaches on small weepers on flair fittings.
    Still sucks to get a leak.
    You aren’t kidding about being careful.
    “I haven’t failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” - Thomas Edison

    “It’s not whether you get knocked down, it’s whether you get up.” - Vince Lombardi

    "In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics" - Homer Simpson

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Posts
    7
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by rider77 View Post
    I looked through every piece of literature I have on Samsung and found no answer to your question.
    Which doesn’t surprise me as their information is directly translated from Korean. Some is written very generically.
    So I emailed tech support. And they confirmed the outdoor units are capable of a 590 PSI standing pressure test.
    This isn’t limited to a specific unit. Or line.
    It’s just not directly noted in their literature.
    On a personal level, I’ve found many leaks myself going north of 500 that otherwise didn’t show up at lower pressures.
    Back in my startup days, if the installer didn’t confirm to the installation instructions, the install was failed and we didn’t return until the pressure test was done per the manual.
    Thanks everyone for the input. I find this forum both fascinating and informative.
    So when running overnight pressure tests per manual are you factoring in temperature to the pressure reading? I would think pressure readings with that much time in between will likely also have temperature differences to take into account.
    What kind of pressure drop would you consider a failure on a system? it seems to me any drop is unacceptable but I don't think I could readily spot tiny drop on an analog gage set especially with a night in between readings.

  10. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Gladstone, Oregon (Portland)
    Posts
    739
    Post Likes
    Just as an addage to this thread. Daikin states 550 psi for a minimum of one hour, 24 hours recommended. And l will reiterate that in a perfect world that 24 hours would be adhered to, but practicality wins in my world.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor MagazineThe place where Electrical professionals meet.