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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
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    2 Ton Lennox or 3 ton Goodman. 1100 sqft Home in SoCal

    I've gotten two quotes so far from local companies with good ratings online.

    One is saying I'd need 3 tons based off of their load calculations (I have a 1920s home, single pane windows in half of my house etc,). The other is saying i'd only need a 2 ton unit and if I went with a 3 ton the unit my short cycle.

    I was hoping to get some unbiased opinions. Any help would be appreciated.

    -Brandon

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Dover, DE
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    Post the manual J load calculation and lets see. If you have a copy, which most companies dont give out until the contract is signed.
    I havent failed. Ive just found 10,000 ways that wont work. - Thomas Edison

    Its not whether you get knocked down, its whether you get up. - Vince Lombardi

    "In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics" - Homer Simpson

    Local 486 Instructor & Service Technician

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    PA
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    2 tons sounds more like the proper size. Unless your in Death Valley.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Millsboro, DE
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    Love it!

    You're deciding whether you need 550 SF/Ton or 367, as compared to new homes at 1,000 to 1,350+. Do request both Manual J calculations, post them and we'll all have some fun. Offer to pay a fee for the calculations and they don't get the job, qualified that the inputs comply with Manual J (it's a book, by the way), in the likely event they refuse. A DE guy does them for $175.

    Me, I'd fix the home some first: Windows, repairs indicated by blower door test, attic insulation, etc. Commission an Energy Audit if you haven't done so.

    There are billionaires who don't think they have enough money, so I'd understand if you're concerned about additional expense, but 733 SF/Ton - 1-1/2 tons - doesn't scare me for an improved version of your home. You'd be limited to 16+/- SEER, but so what? You're talking 1,100 SF, so how much can it cost to heat and cool? There are probably incentives for weatherization, you should check that.

    You have a unique opportunity here to make it right and spend a lot less on the HVAC in the process.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
    2 tons sounds more like the proper size. Unless your in Death Valley.
    I'm in Riverside, CA. Average highs in summer are low to mid 90s although it'll get to triple digits for a week or two. Average lows in Winter are in the 40's although it'll get to mid or low 30's for a week or two.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
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    Thread Starter
    I am concerned about the additional expense of windows and insulation as some of the windows are original to the home and almost 90 years old. I've requested the load calculations from the one of the company and will post it when I receive them. The HVAC test used a web based system and entered a bunch of information and the system told him 2.7 tons is what I'd need which is why he then recommended the 3 ton system. He said if I went smaller, the unit would have to run alot to heat or cool the home which would cause it not to last as long.

    The other HVAC rep who recommended the 2 ton unit said that he only based his calculation of the square footage of the home.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Dover, DE
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    Is there existing ductwork and/or an existing unit?
    If so what tonnage is it?
    What size and material are the existing ducts?
    I havent failed. Ive just found 10,000 ways that wont work. - Thomas Edison

    Its not whether you get knocked down, its whether you get up. - Vince Lombardi

    "In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics" - Homer Simpson

    Local 486 Instructor & Service Technician

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
    Posts
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC0004 View Post
    He said if I went smaller, the unit would have to run alot to heat or cool the home which would cause it not to last as long.
    .
    Hes done show him the door!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    New England
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    Keep getting more bids who knows someone probably say you need a 2.5 ton system...

    Ask them for the AHRI certified number to prove a matching system, you can check the SEER and EER rating. If your going higher SEER units your state or local utility company may offer rebates.

    https://www.ahridirectory.org/

    http://www.dsireusa.org/

    Free. http://www.loadcalc.net/
    Last edited by Bazooka Joey; 02-24-2019 at 10:13 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Saint Augustine, Florida
    Posts
    54
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    There is a wesite called Coolcalc that has a reasonable easy and somewhat accurate load calculating tool. You would need to create an account with them but there is no charge unless you actually need to print the manual j. And even then its only 3 bucks per report. It may take you a bit to navigate the site but they do have good tech assist with email and videos. They have incorporated google earth along with the local building departments information to formulate what is an ACCA approved manual j. By doing your own manual j you will not only save money but you will be empowering your self to see all the different aspects of your homes envelope (walls, roofs, windows,etc) With that learned knowledge you will be able to better judge how to first spend your financial resources for the future occupants in the home.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Millsboro, DE
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    Good to be concerned, as we all are: With all due respect, please think about whether it's best to conserve energy by proper design/installation, OR TO WASTE ENERGY EFFICIENTLY per the guys from the Alpha Hotel.

    Like I've said, I don't pretend to come close to knowing everything like I thought I did in 1972 when I was 30 and acted like I knew it all. There are a few people here at that age who have the OPPORTUNITY TO MAKE BIG BUCKS WITH TOTAL JOB SECURITY FOREVER, and I'm encouraging them to jump on it!

    Please help me learn more

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    PA
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    Long run times do not harm or shorten the equipment's life span.
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    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

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