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  1. #14
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    ok ... watched a few very informative youtube videos


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w4qcoEXYqK0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KZJg06JkuaQ

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GMns62-ZVDc


    thinking the game plan might be initially to install 4 - 100 watt panels, with the appropriate sized batteries

    https://www.amazon.com/Renogy-Polycr...garden&sr=1-10

    then to upgrade the system with an additional 4 - 100 watt panels and batteries as I can afford them, then an additional 4 - 100 watt panels as I can afford them, eventually getting to 12 - 100 watt panels ..... that will get me up to 10 amps, which should allow me to run my refrigerator, TV, modem, router, and some other small devises, and my AC system ( box fan on high speed ) ... obviously will be nowhere near being able to run an air compressor, arc welder, washing machine, clothes dryer .. but that is ok

    will probably purchase this 2000 watt inverter charger or similar

    https://www.amazon.com/Renogy-2000Wa...r=1-5-fkmrnull

    figure by the inverter being well above my usage it should run the system comfortably while allowing for the system to be upgraded

    need to place a call to that local battery place to get some prices on some batteries, which is better, golf cart or deep cycle RV batteries ?

    obviously will research this more, seems like somewhat of a daunting task ...... not cheap, not too expansive, not even sure if there will be a payback, but my way of sticking it to ' the man ' and looking out in the event of power outages or something even more serious ....
    Last edited by hvacskills; 02-22-2019 at 10:03 AM.

  2. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    The way I would do this would be to install another breaker panel next to the main panel. Wire it as a sub-panel - with separate neutral and ground conductors.

    Then move all the breakers and wires for the loads you want to solar electric power over to the new sub panel. Put them all on one side of the panel.

    In the sub panel and in the main panel install matching breakers - wire them to each other. With both of these breakers on - your street power will supply the sub-panel circuits. With both of those breakers off - the sub panel will be isolated from street power.

    Feed the output from your inverter into a breaker in the subpanel. With ONLY this feed-breaker on the solar electric will supply your subpanel circuits.

    Feed the output from your generator into a breaker in the subpanel. With ONLY this feed breaker on the generator will supply your subpanel circuits.

    ONLY USE ONE feed breaker at a time to avoid back feeding power to the other sources.

    YOU will have to manually isolate the competing circuits but it will save you from having to buy an expensive piece of switch gear.

    There is a very real possibility of burning things up by cross connecting them so I would color code the various breakers and post a big legible clear and permanent list of instructions for your reference - right next to the panels. While you are wiring it up you will be positive that you will never forget. But a few months later you will - so post the clear instructions and refer to them Every Single Time.

    PHM
    -------------

    that is what I was thinking, a sub panel strictly for the solar system ... I am re wiring the house anyhow, new panels, new wiring, so I could add an outlet here or there just for the solar system, then run them to a sub panel, I will read and re read your post to try and make sense how to connect everything, or how not to connect everything ...... thanks PHM

    are there codes regarding the installation of solar systems if I am not tied into the grid ?


    hvacskills going off grid maybe ?

  3. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    YOU will have to manually isolate the competing circuits but it will save you from having to buy an expensive piece of switch gear.

    PHM
    -------------
    could I use a manual fork type switching device that would switch power to the sub panel either by the solar system or the grid ? I would think that would be pretty much fail safe ..... I think the concern is that the solar system could feed power back into the grid while the grid was down and being repaired .... would not want to take a chance of that happening ...

    it is possible I could just leave the solar system isolated, other than the inverter charging the batteries using electricity from the grid, electricity could not possibly flow back into the grid from the batteries / panels through the inverter could it ?
    Last edited by hvacskills; 02-22-2019 at 12:28 PM.

  4. #17
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    I have a generator that puts out a full 20 amps 120 volts. Not very heavy. Works for me. Even take it around to the neighbors so they can keep their refrigerator cold.
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

  5. #18
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    I am looking at a similar thing only I am looking mainly at lighting load. When I built my house we had 2 panels put in one for grid and a smaller one for solar. the main in the solar panel has a switch so that it can run on grid or solar depending on switch setting. Each room has 2 light systems, one center of the room like ceiling fan or ceiling lights the others are can lights, all are LED. The cans are solar the center lights are grid. All outside lights are solar. Right now everything is running off the grid while I work out the solar set up. The idea is if power goes out once the solar is running I can still have lights throughout the house and outside plus it will drive the neighbors nuts when it looks like I have power and they don't.

    On a similar note I am also looking at solar hot water for domestic and infloor heat. The infloor tubes are in but need to get the rest set up.

  6. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by BNME8EZ View Post
    I am looking at a similar thing only I am looking mainly at lighting load. When I built my house we had 2 panels put in one for grid and a smaller one for solar. the main in the solar panel has a switch so that it can run on grid or solar depending on switch setting. Each room has 2 light systems, one center of the room like ceiling fan or ceiling lights the others are can lights, all are LED. The cans are solar the center lights are grid. All outside lights are solar. Right now everything is running off the grid while I work out the solar set up. The idea is if power goes out once the solar is running I can still have lights throughout the house and outside plus it will drive the neighbors nuts when it looks like I have power and they don't.

    On a similar note I am also looking at solar hot water for domestic and infloor heat. The infloor tubes are in but need to get the rest set up.
    check out the video links I posted, probably could help you figure your situation out ... LED lighting should not use a lot of electricity, you could probably get by with a pretty small system ...

    like to know more about your switching set up for your second panel

    I watched another video also that goes into nice detail about appliance / watt sizing I will try to track it down and post it

  7. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by hvacskills View Post
    check out the video links I posted, probably could help you figure your situation out ... LED lighting should not use a lot of electricity, you could probably get by with a pretty small system ...

    like to know more about your switching set up for your second panel

    I watched another video also that goes into nice detail about appliance / watt sizing I will try to track it down and post it
    Yeah, I was going to follow this thread pretty close, add where I can but hopefully pick up a lot. I will see if I can post some pics of the panel set up.

  8. #21
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    Picture time. The first one is of the main and the solar boxes. The next one is the switch inside the solar box. The breaker that is on is powered from the breaker in the main box the one under will be feed by the solar set up. I took a shot of the number of the solar box. Then there is a shot of the breaker feeding the solar box. Last is the floor tubing and tank for the solar hot water. The lines hanging are from tube attached to the under side of the floor for warm floors on the main floor. Right now the solar tank is tied to the HW generator on the WSHP so theoretically I could heat the floor to an extent with that. I just think right now I am probably saving more preheating the water than adding heat to the floor.

  9. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by BNME8EZ View Post
    Picture time. The first one is of the main and the solar boxes. The next one is the switch inside the solar box. The breaker that is on is powered from the breaker in the main box the one under will be feed by the solar set up. I took a shot of the number of the solar box. Then there is a shot of the breaker feeding the solar box.
    ok, that looks simple enough ..... looks like the sliding bracket is built into the breaker box panel and allows either one or the other breaker to be activated ...... thanks for the pictures and taking a picture of the breaker box model number

    I looked for the additional video I was I was talking about that explains how to size everything better but could not find it, but here is a video that talks about panel types, guess there are different types of panels for different lighting conditions .....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fl4skasaHmM&t=1535s

    obviously I can not guarantee what is in each video so watcher beware ! ! !, but often times in the ' comment section ' you see corrections ....

    I will still look for that other video ... found it !

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGFYztgks3Q


    looks like I need to keep watching and understanding more videos ..... and I thought HVAC was difficult !

  10. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    I have a generator that puts out a full 20 amps 120 volts. Not very heavy. Works for me. Even take it around to the neighbors so they can keep their refrigerator cold.
    the one I bought is only around 16 amps I believe, but it is pretty lightweight, about the same weight as a ULV-1

  11. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by hvacskills View Post
    the one I bought is only around 16 amps I believe, but it is pretty lightweight, about the same weight as a ULV-1
    Simple and easy. Just need to keep 5 gallons of gasoline around. Or, if you're Pagey, 7.5 gallons of E85.
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

  12. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    Simple and easy. Just need to keep 5 gallons of gasoline around. Or, if you're Pagey, 7.5 gallons of E85.
    E85 eh ?

  13. #26
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    I guess with E85, you'd need a flex fuel generator. I bought my generator maybe 20 years ago, and it has really come in handy through the years. Power during a power outage, work site with no power, one time I was sent to the job with a gantry and heavy motor. Once on the job, I realized I needed the generator to unload the load up the motors into the vehicle.


    Quote Originally Posted by hvacskills View Post
    E85 eh ?
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

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