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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    Thread Starter
    They said 0.055 at 8 ft.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    15,270
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    That's a good size bore. Are there access fittings on the high and low side ?

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    Thread Starter
    Yeah, there's a service valve on the low side, and high side has one on the liquid line just before the cap.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    15,270
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    So pull the charge and add nitrogen to the hi side. Watch your low side and see how fast it rises.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    22
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    Thread Starter
    Hit the high side with 50psi and it took nearly 20 minutes to level off. the cap tube was inside the suction line, I snipped the cap at the ends and ran the new one taped to the suction line, luckily the suction line was just sitting inside the box behind the rear panels, so it was easy to access, though the top of the cap tube was really difficult to work with. behind the evap in the corner. (picture if I'm allowed to post them) got a vacuum and weighed it in, ran while I was cleaning up and it came down to 45 by the time I got loaded up. Thanks for the advice guys.
    Of course the images go in sideways
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  6. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
    Posts
    19,137
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    Get to temperature, get a frost line at the pump, back it 6 - 8” off done

  7. Likes icemeister liked this post
  8. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Australia : Queensland
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    Cap tubes are normally inside suction line for heat transfer , that’s how we did it anyway.

    Also recommend to have one of these as some manufacturers don’t like to give design information such as length & bore.

    https://www.actrol.com.au/product/re...-10971-8001860
    The primary function of the design engineer is to make things difficult for the fabricator and impossible for the serviceman.

  9. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    5,231
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    If the old cap tube had bad cholesterol , you know , clogged inside of it , then your new one is going to clog up too because the oil inside of the compressor is contaminated

    Pull that 134a back out , vacuum it down , get some Supco 88 oil , pour 4 oz into a cup , then shove your yellow hose end into the cup , open low side and oil will suck into hose , close low side , now attach yellow hose to 134 jug and charge unit back up

    Most of the time this works

    I usually install a larger drier , like 052 , and crimp the end with pliers to make the cap tube fit snug

  10. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Sea to Sky
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    2,796
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snapperhead View Post
    If the old cap tube had bad cholesterol , you know , clogged inside of it , then your new one is going to clog up too because the oil inside of the compressor is contaminated

    Pull that 134a back out , vacuum it down , get some Supco 88 oil , pour 4 oz into a cup , then shove your yellow hose end into the cup , open low side and oil will suck into hose , close low side , now attach yellow hose to 134 jug and charge unit back up

    Most of the time this works

    I usually install a larger drier , like 052 , and crimp the end with pliers to make the cap tube fit snug
    052-CAP-T.....new Sporlan cap tune drier specifically for trapping wax and crap that plugs cap tubes.

    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk

  11. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    2,078
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    I have used silver tape with success to attach the capillary tube to the suction line .... trick is to remove all if the old tape, and to clean the suction line ( steel wool ) ...... then to securely, carefully, tightly attach the capillary tube to suction line ..... there are programs that tell you how much of the capillary tube needs to be attached to the suction line ...

    as mentioned the reason the capillary tube needs to be attached to the suction line is to ensure sub cooling ..... as the refrigerant passes through the capillary tube it will see a substantial pressure drop, securing the capillary tube to the suction line helps ensure the refrigerant will remain sub cooled ( a liquid )

    weighing in the refrigerant charge is preferred .... another method is to obtain roughly a 10 degree evaporator outlet superheat starting at around 43 - 45 degree box temperature all the way down to shut off, without flooding the coil, I use this method to ' top off ' a units refrigerant charge with much success

    as mentioned the old oil might be contaminated and in most cases will need to be changed or treated, with a system flush, or the new capillary tube will block up
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing." (Edmund Burke)

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