Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 14 to 23 of 23
  1. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
    Posts
    3,803
    Post Likes
    The down side of TAB is the bare truth pisses some people off at times from the contractors to the engineers. Some times I feel like a professional pisser offer.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

  2. #15
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
    Posts
    25,395
    Post Likes
    I'm with the crowd telling you to stay in the industry, just not what you are doing now.

    Something that has not been mentioned is ultra low temp work. I did that for several years. it's interesting, challenging, and pretty darn easy. Even get to sit on your butt for quite a while at times while waiting for things to happen. 90% of the time or greater you are working in an air-conditioned environment.
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Millsboro, DE
    Posts
    181
    Post Likes
    One of my Mentors was an Engineer for a big sheet metal contractor in Philadelphia. I'd spec'd a school balancing job back before I had a clue and questioned some of the reported results. He reviewed the report and enlightened me about "Kitchen Table Air Balancing", practiced by guys who don't have transportation. Sadly, since then I've seen more than a few bogus readings.

    A certified balancing contractor's in a tough spot: He depends on Consulting Engineers for work and payment therefore, but humans - Engineers included - make mistakes. I saw a job where an Engineer spec'd 190 CFM thru a 6" flex on a low pressure system. The initial report said 90 CFM and the Engineer rejected it, saying "must be within +/-10% of design"; the final report said 175 CFM, but I later determined that's the only thing that changed (still 6", still 90 CFM a couple of years later). But the Engineer had his *** covered and everyone was happy. As with all contracting this type of contractor is not prevalent in the TAB community. There are some great ones out there.

    That job, my Mentor's encouragement, and a rotten flex installation in a new United Way Agency building we serviced put me on the path and Ive loved doing what I do.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
    Posts
    3,803
    Post Likes
    One thing engineers have to learn is to read the balance summary. TAB has to learn that they owe an explanation in the summary if balance can't be done within design specified tolerances. I had one report rejected because an existing exhaust fan was not capable of delivering design airflow. What pissed me off was the engineer watched me change sheaves on the fan and max out the amps. When I called him his excuse was the owner was holding his feet to the fire and wanted design flow. I told him to either buy them a new fan or get them to understand the fan couldn't do any more and except it. I had included in the summary the fan was maxed out and a bigger motor wouldn't solve the problem.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    kansas
    Posts
    1,720
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by WAYNE3298 View Post
    The down side of TAB is the bare truth pisses some people off at times from the contractors to the engineers. Some times I feel like a professional pisser offer.
    This seems like a field I can accelerate at
    Honeywell you can buy better but you cant pay more

    I told my wife when i die to sell my fishing stuff for what its worth not what i told her i paid for it

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    kansas
    Posts
    1,720
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    I'm with the crowd telling you to stay in the industry, just not what you are doing now.

    Something that has not been mentioned is ultra low temp work. I did that for several years. it's interesting, challenging, and pretty darn easy. Even get to sit on your butt for quite a while at times while waiting for things to happen. 90% of the time or greater you are working in an air-conditioned environment.
    Yes but I hate fiberglass insulation and I can never seem to get that crap back in there on those chambers
    Honeywell you can buy better but you cant pay more

    I told my wife when i die to sell my fishing stuff for what its worth not what i told her i paid for it

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Millsboro, DE
    Posts
    181
    Post Likes
    I'm thinking Wayne sleeps well at night.

    You think the TAB/ Consulting Engineer relationship is tough, try depending on a bunch of slow-paying Architects who "Live in the Alpha Hotel" for your livelihood. Had a couple of apples out of that barrel early on, but try to avoid them when I can.

    Think military slang.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
    Posts
    3,803
    Post Likes
    fed1942 the average time it took for me to collect on completed TAB contracts was over 5 months. One job took 11 months and it was only $1800. One architect stiffed everyone but me and the only reason he didn't stiff me was I refused to do the job under contract to him. I ended up with a direct contract to the owner. I had to pull out all the stops to get paid on some jobs. I told some of the aholes to not bother to call me again because I wouldn't do any more work for them. One guy never paid in less than 7 months and always wrote a check for less than the contract amount. That was the part of the business I hated.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Millsboro, DE
    Posts
    181
    Post Likes
    Thank you 3298! Alpha = A and Hotel = H in military speak, so we're of a mind there. I'll have been in the Construction Industry for 61 years as of June 12, and can relate: I've been (insert a word of your choice here) by Champions!

    On a personal note: The hardest thing I have to deal with is techs I respect automatically assume I live in the place I mentioned because I'm an Engineer. Again, thanks!

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
    Posts
    3,803
    Post Likes
    ferd1942 we are of the same mind. Between engineering and TAB I have been around for over 55 years. A lot of engineers contribute to their own problems. By that I mean a lot assume when there is a problem they can blow any BS they want past everyone on the project and end up smelling like a rose even if they are wrong. When I worked for a consulting engineering firm I got calls from contractors that were aggressive from word one. At the time I didn't understand it but after getting into TAB I ran into some of these know it all jerks. They didn't know they were screwing with someone that had knowledge on both sides of the coin so to speak with 25 years experience doing what they do which in most cases was a lot more experience than they had.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •