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  1. #1
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    Conversion from R12 to Hotshot in sailboat

    This is my 1st post. My wife and I are retired truckers sailing our sailboat presently in the Marshall Islands. Our Crosby holding plate engine driven system has worked well for 40 years but we can no longer get R12 so decided to change to Hotshot 2.
    My question is, do I have to change any seals in the Tecumseh 2 cyl compressor? Compressor No. 4985511 and Pt CR 2101 25149. I understand that no oil change is necessary.
    What else should I do besides vacuuming system out and refilling with Hotshot 2?
    Thanks for any help
    Gary

  2. #2
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    Not sure what a Tecumseh 2 Cyl comp is so I'll ASSUME its belt drive off the engine!

    Not sure on the seals but I've converted several boat systems to Hot Shot I then II when the price got too high.

    There is a member here that specializes in compressor overhauls maybe hell check in!

  3. #3
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    Is that "2 cyl" or 2 cylinder ?

  4. #4
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    R12 is still available it's just $$. Why not fix the leak?

  5. #5
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    Thread Starter

    Conversion R12 to Hotshot 2

    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    Is that "2 cyl" or 2 cylinder ?
    It is a twin cylinder Tecumseh belted off engine.

  6. #6
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  7. #7
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    Those two cylinder compressors were used widely on everything from Dodge pickups to Cat and Cummins truck engines. York made a nearly identical compressor, the main difference being what it is made of, either ferrous metal or aluminum.

    The question of seals is a question of the oil type being required. Since I never used Hot Shot, I don't know if it needs something other than mineral oil, like R12 used. When you find out which oil is required, you will have your answer.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    Those two cylinder compressors were used widely on everything from Dodge pickups to Cat and Cummins truck engines. York made a nearly identical compressor, the main difference being what it is made of, either ferrous metal or aluminum.

    The question of seals is a question of the oil type being required. Since I never used Hot Shot, I don't know if it needs something other than mineral oil, like R12 used. When you find out which oil is required, you will have your answer.
    MO is fine with Hot Shot I & II

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by pecmsg View Post
    MO is fine with Hot Shot I & II
    So...with the same oil, the seals won't know the difference in refrigerant mixtures.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    So...with the same oil, the seals won't know the difference in refrigerant mixtures.
    There is the density of the difference refrigerants in the mixtures. 134A is less dense then 12 was do yes there were a few new leaks when converting.

  11. #11
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    I would assume that some leaks were due to higher pressures. That used to happen in the auto world during the "134a conversion" era.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

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