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  1. #14
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    Sep 2002
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    Are the piers masonry of some sort or are they wood?

    PHM
    -------


    Quote Originally Posted by brock125 View Post
    I have a question about installing the vapor barrier. I have a pier and beam foundation. Do I also cover the beams with plastic? What about the walls? I wasn’t sure if installing a vapor barrier was the same as the similar step in the encapsulation process.

    Is installing a vapor barrier something that an average “handyman” could do? I’d normally try to do it myself but I have a short crawl space and I’m a big guy. I’m looking to see if one of the neighborhood handymen can do it. I’m planning on buying some of the heavier duty plastic gurvghe vapor barrier. Do I need to add any padding or anything on top of the dirt prior to covering it with the plastic? I plan on clearing out the debris that is currently scattered throughout my crawl space first. Any other tips/suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  2. #15
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    Feb 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    Are the piers masonry of some sort or are they wood?

    PHM
    -------
    They are masonary. I’ve seen the full encapsulation pictures where they show the piers being fully covered with plastic along with the side walls. I wasn’t sure if that was needed or not.

  3. #16
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    Sep 2002
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    Well; nothing is really 'needed' - other than a large enough dehumidifier. <g>

    If the piers and side walls are masonry - sealing them with plastic will reduce the loading on the dehumidifier. On the other hand; I would be very hesitate to cover over wood.

    Getting rid of moisture makes an amazing difference. I hope you are as delighted with it as I always am with a successful project

    PHM
    ----------


    Quote Originally Posted by brock125 View Post
    They are masonary. I’ve seen the full encapsulation pictures where they show the piers being fully covered with plastic along with the side walls. I wasn’t sure if that was needed or not.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  4. #17
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    Feb 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    Well; nothing is really 'needed' - other than a large enough dehumidifier. <g>

    If the piers and side walls are masonry - sealing them with plastic will reduce the loading on the dehumidifier. On the other hand; I would be very hesitate to cover over wood.

    Getting rid of moisture makes an amazing difference. I hope you are as delighted with it as I always am with a successful project

    PHM
    ----------
    Thank you for that info.

    Any suggestions on the best way to attach it to the wall/piers (both masonary)?

    A second question, if I don’t attach the plastic to the wall/piers and only cover the dirt floor with it then how would I keep it in place? Are there any suggested approaches for dealing with the piers when laying out the plastic on the ground? Do I cut it out around them?

  5. #18
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    Feb 2019
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    Thread Starter
    Does anybody have any tips for attaching the plastic to masonry walls/piers? Is drilling into the wall/pier and using the plastic christmas tree fasteners the best/only way to do it? Thanks in advance.

  6. #19
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    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by brock125 View Post
    Does anybody have any tips for attaching the plastic to masonry walls/piers? Is drilling into the wall/pier and using the plastic christmas tree fasteners the best/only way to do it? Thanks in advance.
    Nailing 2"X 2" strips over the plastic against the wall. Caulk and tape seams.
    Keep us posted.
    A Santa Fe Compact will handle 2,000 sq.ft. of crawl space.
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  7. #20
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    Feb 2019
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    Thread Starter
    One more question...should I purchase vapor barrier stakes in order to secure it to the ground?

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
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    I did a “poor man” crawl space seal under my house about five years ago.

    House is about fifty years old. Vapor barrier on the crawl floor was in bad shape. Vents all open and everything sweating.

    I just laid fairly thick plastic on the floor. Didn’t tape seams just overlapped a few feet. Went to the masonry foundation walls, not up the walls. I had vents that automatically opened when it was warm. I just put a piece of light ga metal over them. Started out with a Lowe’s el cheapo dehumidifier someone gave me. It really worked great, solved the problem. After a year I bought a better dehum like the ones tb reps.

    Sealing up the foundation walls would save a little power as the unit would run less. The floor plan of my house juts around and it was going to be a pita to really do a good job on the walls.

    I wish I had used plexy glass to seal the vents instead of metal, to let a little natural light in.

  9. #22
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    Feb 2019
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    Thread Starter
    UPDATE:

    I was able to get my crawl space encapsulated (foundation vents sealed and vapor barrier installed) and dehumidifier (Aprilaire 1830) installed. The dehumidifier read 78% when I started in on the morning of 4/6. It currently read 52% but it's been running nonstop for over 2 days. The crawl space is around 1200 sq ft with a height of 18-24". Should I be concerned that it's been running for over 2 days now? It went from 78% to 58% after 1 day. It went from 58% on 4/7 to 52% this afternoon on 4/8. I'm using an Aprilaire 76 control unit with it and I have it set to 5 (if that means anything to any of you). It looks like this setting relies on the temp and %RH to determine when it will start/stop running. The temp in the crawl space has been between 65 and 70 degrees for the past few days according to another sensor I have down there. I was mostly curious if running for this long is the norm or not.

  10. #23
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    Sep 2002
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    It's not something that I would worry about. Don't forget - that reading you are seeing is the RH % of the AIR in the crawlspace - not the floor. The now drier air is still drawing the moisture out of the floor and walls and ceiling of the space.

    I would let it run for a week or two before I would look into judging the results.

    PHM
    ----------



    Quote Originally Posted by brock125 View Post
    UPDATE:

    I was able to get my crawl space encapsulated (foundation vents sealed and vapor barrier installed) and dehumidifier (Aprilaire 1830) installed. The dehumidifier read 78% when I started in on the morning of 4/6. It currently read 52% but it's been running nonstop for over 2 days. The crawl space is around 1200 sq ft with a height of 18-24". Should I be concerned that it's been running for over 2 days now? It went from 78% to 58% after 1 day. It went from 58% on 4/7 to 52% this afternoon on 4/8. I'm using an Aprilaire 76 control unit with it and I have it set to 5 (if that means anything to any of you). It looks like this setting relies on the temp and %RH to determine when it will start/stop running. The temp in the crawl space has been between 65 and 70 degrees for the past few days according to another sensor I have down there. I was mostly curious if running for this long is the norm or not.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    St. Louis
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    How sealed is the floor of the house ?

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
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    To confirm that the dehu is functioning, measure the condensate from the dehu for an hour. Your unit should remove 2-3 lbs./pints per hour.
    Also measure the temp/%RH of the dehu supply verses the air going into the return. This will confirm the amount of moisture being removed by comparing the dew point in and out.
    As others pointed out, any air from the home passing through the crawlspace will benefit from the dehumidifier.
    It takes a couple weeks to dry down the materials in the crawlspace. During windy damp weather, the dehu may run 50%-75% of the time. After dry down and when the outdoor dew points are below the dew point desired in the crawlspace, the dehu should run much less.
    A 68^F, 50%RH crawlspace is 49^F. Consider that outside vary from 60^F-75^F. During cold weather, the outdoor dew is much lower, usually equal to the evening low temperatures, but the crawlspace is cooler and may still have a small dehumidifier load.
    Someday when the dehu fails consider the Santa Fe Compact, my favorite. The unit you have should be large enough to do the job. Keeping your crawlspace dry will help keep your home dry!

    Keep us posted.
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by servicefitter View Post
    How sealed is the floor of the house ?
    I’m not exactly sure. It has the original hardwood floors or at least that’s how it appears.

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