Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 27 to 35 of 35
  1. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Treasure coast, FL
    Posts
    7,910
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    I own Nestle' stock and so buy only Nestle' bottled water. And by the way; I would greatly appreciate it it you all would do the same. <g>

    But when I live by myself, like right now, I buy all my bottled water (Nestle! Don't Forget!) for consumption, including cooking, from Sam's Club. I never kept track before but I would gauge that I spend about $8-10. per week on Nestle' water. So let's call it about $10. per person per week - $500. per year. Family of five: $2500. per year

    I don't know what I pay in NJ but in FL I pay $5-10. per month for all my tap water. Say the same family-projection and we'll call it $500. per year.

    So that would have me at $3000. per year for a family of five in Florida.

    How much are you spending now for spring water?
    How much are you spending now for tap water?
    How deep of a well would you require to obtain pure clean water?
    What chemical(s) are they adding to your strained-out-turd water?

    I ask because I could tolerate chlorine but in FL they switched to chloramine - where tears my ass UP. And yes; I know I can disassociate the chlorine from the ammonia with an acid - but That Ain't My Friggin Job. <g>

    PHM
    -----------
    I've always been a tap water kind of guy - but you know what? We had a bunch of zephyrhills (a subsidiary of Nestle - you're welcome) bottles left over from my son's birthday party, so I've been drinking those from time to time - and the bottled water tastes way better.

    So while I can't bring myself to habitually buy bottled water for what seems like 1,000 times the cost per gallon I get from the tap, I could now see myself purchasing some type of filtration system to make my cheap water taste better.

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    18,060
    Post Likes
    .
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    9,576
    Post Likes
    I have a well, 280' deep. Water then goes to a green sand filter the size of a large oxygen tank, then to a softener. The water from the well is safe but does contain all the expected minerals. A carbon filter will work ok for taste and odor but they need replacement often. Maybe 3 weeks.
    The green sand filter also has a device to cut down any rotten egg smell. That's usually from organic contaminants in the well.
    For just taste and odor the charcoal works great but I've stopped using them because of the maintenance.

    Now my theory about sulfur smells. One reason for the green sand filter was to get rid of the sulfur smell. Even after super shocking the well it would come back. It's gone now except for on place, my remodeled bathroom. Al the faucet supplies in the house are the usual copper tubes. The new bath has those flex rubber supplies sold everywhere. I get strong egg smells and someone said the supplies entrained oxygen like early pex did in radiant systems. OK me thinks, I'll just replace them with the old kind. Not so easy. No one sells the old kind or at least I've not found any. I will try Walmart. I usually don't go there but they often surprise me with how well they are stocked.
    I know I don't want to buy 25' of soft copper.
    Give me a relay with big enough contacts, and I'll run the world!

    You can be anything you want......As long as you don't suck at it.

    If a person wants to create a machine that will be more likely to fail...Make it complicated.

    USAF 98 Bomb Wing 1960-66 SMW Lu49

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Billington Heights, NY
    Posts
    21,628
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by hvacker View Post
    I have a well, 280' deep. Water then goes to a green sand filter the size of a large oxygen tank, then to a softener. The water from the well is safe but does contain all the expected minerals. A carbon filter will work ok for taste and odor but they need replacement often. Maybe 3 weeks.
    The green sand filter also has a device to cut down any rotten egg smell. That's usually from organic contaminants in the well.
    For just taste and odor the charcoal works great but I've stopped using them because of the maintenance.

    Now my theory about sulfur smells. One reason for the green sand filter was to get rid of the sulfur smell. Even after super shocking the well it would come back. It's gone now except for on place, my remodeled bathroom. Al the faucet supplies in the house are the usual copper tubes. The new bath has those flex rubber supplies sold everywhere. I get strong egg smells and someone said the supplies entrained oxygen like early pex did in radiant systems. OK me thinks, I'll just replace them with the old kind. Not so easy. No one sells the old kind or at least I've not found any. I will try Walmart. I usually don't go there but they often surprise me with how well they are stocked.
    I know I don't want to buy 25' of soft copper.
    Supply houses still have metal flex water lines. Usually up to 4 feet long. Some are copper, some are chromed brass.

    Try shocking the house with chlorine first. Bacteria often cause those smells, especially in little used areas or end lines.

  5. #31
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
    Posts
    25,378
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by Snapperhead View Post
    We have been buying spring water for 10 years now because the crap the city pumps to your faucets is FILTERED SEWER mixed with River water

    No seriously , look it up

    So im wondering if anyone has dug their own well , if theres any laws against it
    I have no legal rights to any water underground where my house is, it is in the ccr's, and a water company has all rights to all water underground.
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    6,661
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post

    But when I live by myself, like right now, I buy all my bottled water (Nestle! Don't Forget!) for consumption, including cooking, from Sam's Club. I never kept track before but I would gauge that I spend about $8-10. per week on Nestle' water. So let's call it about $10. per person per week - $500. per year. Family of five: $2500. per year

    I don't know what I pay in NJ but in FL I pay $5-10. per month for all my tap water. Say the same family-projection and we'll call it $500. per year.

    So that would have me at $3000. per year for a family of five in Florida.

    How much are you spending now for spring water?
    How much are you spending now for tap water?
    How deep of a well would you require to obtain pure clean water?

    -----------
    We spend like 4 dollars a case , 2 cases a week , sometimes 3 cases , 4 peoples in la casa

    Tap water costs like 140 , and that's a 90 day period I think

    I have no idea how deep the water table is

    I would call a well drilling guy , but haven't done it yet....

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    9,576
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    Supply houses still have metal flex water lines. Usually up to 4 feet long. Some are copper, some are chromed brass.

    Try shocking the house with chlorine first. Bacteria often cause those smells, especially in little used areas or end lines.
    I know they are out there. Just need to get motivated. Since retiring, I don't get to the supply houses anymore. Still have my accounts though.
    I have shocked my well and all was fine except for the new supplies in the remodel. No where else. The green sand air device seems to get rid of any sulfur smells.
    I do wonder about one thing though. Some devices direct the water into a tank with compressed air. The SO2 (is that right?) prefers existing in air rather than water and liberates it's self and is vented. My air device affects the SO2 directly. The question is the fine print in the filter's install inst says it add an oxygenating element to the water.
    So I think I might interpret that as adding a corrosive element to my pipes.
    All my plumbing is under slab so any failure = being $crewed. The filter is in it's 6th year and no visible problems. Just pondering.
    Give me a relay with big enough contacts, and I'll run the world!

    You can be anything you want......As long as you don't suck at it.

    If a person wants to create a machine that will be more likely to fail...Make it complicated.

    USAF 98 Bomb Wing 1960-66 SMW Lu49

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Billington Heights, NY
    Posts
    21,628
    Post Likes
    yes, rotten eggs smell, whatever the chemical type (there's lots) prefers affinity with air.

    shocking the well is fine... but you also need to shock the system after the charcoal filter, too, to kill any bacteria that produces the odors.

    I just condemned a slab house today... all the plumbing is bad

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    1,638
    Post Likes
    The rules and requirements vary from city to city, to county, to state. Call the city water deparment to ask what rules they have. Every place I have seen that has "city" water eventually forces you to stop using well and septic and move to city services. Some place I go still allow the use of well water or rain water but only for lawn and garden watering. It can't be connected to the house.

    I lived in 4 vastly different place but each place the water bill paid for water, sewer and trash.

    Ultra pure water is corrosive, as it pulls chemical elements from the pipes and fixtures.

    Just my opinion you will be better off collecting a sample and sending it off for a detailed analysis. Many counties can do this. Just about every water softener company I know of is willing to do this and many times for free if they think they can sell you something. Once you get the sample analysis then you decide what you want to filter out. A carbon filter dramaticly improves taste. Then add chemical and particulate. Most are only concerned about kitchen sink (drinking & cooking) so the filtering cost and be pretty inexpensive. Softeners typicaly take care of clothes washers and bathing concerns

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •