Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Soot pump

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    State College, PA
    Posts
    2,970
    Post Likes

    Soot pump

    I guess that is what you call it, not sure. Referring to the device used to check for smoke on oil equipment.

    Anyway, am I the only one or does anyone else notice that the pump tube builds up with soot from testing and no matter how the appliance is running it looks like #10 smoke? Maybe I am doing this wrong or something.

    Seems like every year I need to use alcohol to clean the tube which is all sooted up. Is this normal?

    Only takes a few minutes so no big deal. Just wondering if this is normal or is there something I am doing wrong.
    Can someone please explain to me -
    Why is there never enough time to do it right the first time, but plenty of time to do it twice?


    Please view site rules: http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread.php?t=1241

    Apply for Pro Membership: http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread.php?t=116113

    Find your local HVAC-Talk Contractor: http://hvac-talk.com/aop

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Billington Heights, NY
    Posts
    21,628
    Post Likes
    smoke pump i think it's called:

    https://www.trutechtools.com/05540307

    ive never had that problem that you describe. do you test a ton of bad systems?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    State College, PA
    Posts
    2,970
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    smoke pump i think it's called:

    https://www.trutechtools.com/05540307

    ive never had that problem that you describe. do you test a ton of bad systems?
    Thanks Marc.

    Glad to see you out of the penalty box.

    That looks like the one I have.

    I don't do a lot of oil. A few years ago I did one that was sooting up pretty bad, but other than that no real bad ones.

    Maybe a new pump is in order.
    Can someone please explain to me -
    Why is there never enough time to do it right the first time, but plenty of time to do it twice?


    Please view site rules: http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread.php?t=1241

    Apply for Pro Membership: http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread.php?t=116113

    Find your local HVAC-Talk Contractor: http://hvac-talk.com/aop

  4. Likes HVAC_Marc liked this post.
  5. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    32
    Post Likes
    Little late to the party here but still trying to get the edit user profile section to open haha

    I have had the gasket at the rear of a couple pumps go bad or get dried out and that made it difficult to move in and out but never really had to clean them out. If you check the flue through the draft regulator and see black smoke going up the chimney, or check over fire and can visibly see smoke donít even test until you can open up your air band and shutter a bit.

    I also try and keep the probe from dragging across the inside of the flue when pumping. Lean the pump up against a hard surface as u push/pull otherwise itíll wiggle everywhere, scoop up soot and give you a false #10 reading.

    If it does come out @#10 Iíll move the smoke paper, go another 10 pumps outside the flue, check the reading and repeat until your starting the test with a clean tube.

    Just my two cents but itís worked for years for me

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Broomall, PA
    Posts
    2,945
    Post Likes
    I don't even understand what you are talking about. They tell you how to maintain the pump. I'm on my second one in 30 years. How do you drag the probe across the inside of the flue? Couldn't do it on purpose with a proper working smoke gun.
    You don't (can't) check or even see what a true zero smoke is over the fire. You use the smoke gun, or do it by reading the cad cell. Anything else is pure hackery and won't hold up in court should you soot up, or burn down a house. Good luck telling them..."I set it by looking at it".
    -Steady state
    -Set draft over fire/check at breech
    -Adjust for true zero smoke
    -Check with analyzer, adjust air to drop CO2 1/2%.
    That's the proper way to do it, the only way to do it. The way a professional does it.
    If I do a job in 30 minutes it's because I spent 30 years learning how to do that in 30 minutes. You owe me for the years, not the minutes.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    32
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by STEVEusaPA View Post
    I don't even understand what you are talking about. They tell you how to maintain the pump. I'm on my second one in 30 years. How do you drag the probe across the inside of the flue? Couldn't do it on purpose with a proper working smoke gun.
    You don't (can't) check or even see what a true zero smoke is over the fire. You use the smoke gun, or do it by reading the cad cell. Anything else is pure hackery and won't hold up in court should you soot up, or burn down a house. Good luck telling them..."I set it by looking at it".
    -Steady state
    -Set draft over fire/check at breech
    -Adjust for true zero smoke
    -Check with analyzer, adjust air to drop CO2 1/2%.
    That's the proper way to do it, the only way to do it. The way a professional does it.
    Okay....so yeah just to clarify a few things.. I was answering the OP as far as what he might be doing wrong when heís testing oil equipment to have his smoke test come out at #10 every time.

    I donít have the Testo SmokePump I have a SidHarvey one now which didnít come with the spring protection slip that the Testo does near the probe. The probe has a belly in it so itíll hang from the analysis port. So when I test smoke, if the port was drilled with 3/8Ē or grew bigger the probe can wiggle around and has slid physically into the flue through the port before. I mentioned this because myself and other guys i know have pulled pieces of loose soot into the smoke pump while testing before. Even after cleaning and with system running for 10+min.

    I donít remember ever saying that Iím checking for zero smoke and basing my results and testing off that. I said that if heís about to run a smoke test and can visibly see black smoke running up the flue or rolling around the chamber to not test right away. Am I wrong if Iím assuming that if I can see black smoke drafting up the flue that chances are the test paper is gonna come out black at #10 or close to it? Which was why I said to adjust the air.

    I do not tuneup, check, adjust, or leave burners without running a combustion efficiency test. I know of at least one company in my area that works on oil exclusively and none of the techs have any kind of Testo or Bacharach. I donít work for them.

    Not sure if I read your reply the wrong way or if I worded mine strangely but No hackery here. Hope I cleared that up






    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •