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  1. #40
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    32
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    Quote Originally Posted by STEVEusaPA View Post
    George is simply the best. His book store portion of his website should be opened back up in the spring.
    His books
    -Advanced Oilburners
    -Riello Oil
    -Book about fuel pumps (blanking on the title)
    are the main 3 books every oilburner tech should own. You also can’t go wrong with his wiring books, as well as his book on hydronics.
    His forum is on Facebook. If I ever get on FB it will be just for that.

    That bleeder is easy to make. One trip to Pep Boys. His book on fuel pumps explains how I built it.
    Any idea what’s up with his website? Most everything seems disabled and I saw something about the tool section. Being closed forever?

    And sad to say I did not put together that the Steve in the article and you were the same person until just now.

    (Head bang on table)


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Broomall, PA
    Posts
    3,015
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    Yeah tools are done unless you take one of his classes. Books will be back in the Spring. When we last spoke via email he said he’s officially a snowbird, out of Massachusetts for the winter.
    If I do a job in 30 minutes it's because I spent 30 years learning how to do that in 30 minutes. You owe me for the years, not the minutes.

  3. #42
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Posts
    3,048
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    Quote Originally Posted by hvacker View Post
    I have changed thousands of oil filters and not had drip problems you mention or ever thought I needed to out gas a filter. It's difficult to imaging a drip measurably changing the CO2 in a test. Impingement I can understand. How much CO2 is in a drip?

    My results might not be of the lab variety but still valid because of observation. If I had a drip after resetting the check valve the pump would have been changed. I changed very few pumps and like I said the reset method was from Sunstrand.

    I can understand how air, at least in amounts needed to affect a nozzle, could cause drips if the partial vacuum in the supply tube was not sufficient to prevent the oil from draining out the nozzle. In fact I used to test plugged nozzles by holding the tube assembly up with the nozzle higher to see if oil would drain out. Had to be larger than .6 or it might not drain anyway.
    This wasn't a pass/fail test, just evidence gathering usually on no heat call.
    You are confusing CO with CO2. I stated that by measuring CO (carbon monoxide) at Shut-Down will give you a good idea on whether you have after-drip or impingement. Measuring CO at Light-Off and Shut-Down make it even simpler.
    captain CO

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    9,656
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    CO, CO2 It's all the same thing man.. I did think you meant CO2.
    I know some burners just light better. The old shell heads with really long burner tubes ( some 3' long) always lit off better and shorter tubes seemed to have more ignition problems. Long tubes had a slight delay before full combustion air arrived over short tubes. The worse, GE Upshot.
    Probably in most cases the combustion process wasn't analyzed as close as might be today. I remember a guy that said he always replaced a nozzle with the next larger so he would get better ignition. After a few years of going to the same burner the nozzle was way more than one size larger.
    Give me a relay with big enough contacts, and I'll run the world!

    You can be anything you want......As long as you don't suck at it.

    If a person wants to create a machine that will be more likely to fail...Make it complicated.

    USAF 98 Bomb Wing 1960-66 SMW Lu49

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Posts
    3,048
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by hvacker View Post
    CO, CO2 It's all the same thing man.. I did think you meant CO2.
    I know some burners just light better. The old shell heads with really long burner tubes ( some 3' long) always lit off better and shorter tubes seemed to have more ignition problems. Long tubes had a slight delay before full combustion air arrived over short tubes. The worse, GE Upshot.
    Probably in most cases the combustion process wasn't analyzed as close as might be today. I remember a guy that said he always replaced a nozzle with the next larger so he would get better ignition. After a few years of going to the same burner the nozzle was way more than one size larger.
    As I learned over 30 years ago, if you don't measure CO on oil you are asking for trouble. CO2 and smoke readings do not tell the whole story. Seems like forever techs have said that oil is dirty and stinky. Okay it might have a smell, but we are the ones that make it dirty.

    Is there that much oil in New Mexico or are you a transplant??
    captain CO

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    9,656
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Davis View Post
    As I learned over 30 years ago, if you don't measure CO on oil you are asking for trouble. CO2 and smoke readings do not tell the whole story. Seems like forever techs have said that oil is dirty and stinky. Okay it might have a smell, but we are the ones that make it dirty.

    Is there that much oil in New Mexico or are you a transplant??


    There is a ton of oil in NM just no oil burners. I am a transplant to NM but over 30 years ago. Very little oil at least in the Albuquerque area. When I first moved here I worked as a tech and I saw one oil burner in 7 or 8 years I was there. The HO told me he had never had it cleaned. The company I was with had no business taking an oil call. I don't think the dispatcher was smart enough to know that. I recommenced the HO contact his oil co as my co. didn't stock any parts.

    Most of my oil experience was in N. Illinois farm towns. All kinds of oil there. Lo pressure, high pressure, no pressure, rotary wall flames, winklers, up shot, down shot, in shot. My hands would crack all winter long.
    A bit of coal too. The only test instruments the shop had were what I found on the a shelf. I had a smoke tester and a pump type analyzer (I forgot who made it, was it Dwyer?) A thermometer. So I could do a couple of basic measurements. I did learn that visual burner adjustments were often wrong. Especially if the burner box was the foam stuff.

    NM has the largest oil deposits in the US at this time but also a bunch of NG. We get a discount on NG.
    I kind of missed the mechanics of oil but not the mess from older burners. Many that were working on oil in Ill. really didn't make a study of it. Compared to oil, NG has no problems. Oil takes a certain finesse. I do read on the forum some curious NG problems that wern't around with older atmospheric naturally aspirated burners.
    Give me a relay with big enough contacts, and I'll run the world!

    You can be anything you want......As long as you don't suck at it.

    If a person wants to create a machine that will be more likely to fail...Make it complicated.

    USAF 98 Bomb Wing 1960-66 SMW Lu49

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    35
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    Check cut off. SOULD BE NO MORE THE 20%.

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