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  1. #14
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    Mar 2015
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    Medford, N.Y.
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    Where does it say that it OK to have the end cone within the combustion chamber/area? Just curious.

  2. #15
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    Jan 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechmanTerry View Post
    Where does it say that it OK to have the end cone within the combustion chamber/area? Just curious.
    Usually never, but some newer boilers, especially with Riello's in them are actually protruding into the combustion chamber, some a few inches.
    If I do a job in 30 minutes it's because I spent 30 years learning how to do that in 30 minutes. You owe me for the years, not the minutes.

  3. #16
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    Jan 2012
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    You could’ve damaged the nozzle line surface where it mates with the nozzle if it was over tightened.

    Following up on what @ TechmanTerry said:
    It could also be excessive heat left in the chamber, combined with the insertion depth issue.
    You can check for excessive heat with a k type thermocouple, the kind you use with an electric meter (wire with a little bead on the end).
    Slip it into the air tube near the nozzle, attach to meter. Run the burner for a cycle (10-15 min), shut it down, see what the temperature is, and does it climb.

    Another option, is to add on an oil valve, non delay, between the pump outlet and the nozzle line.
    Also proper bleeding of a fuel pump requires you use a tube attached to the bleeder and the other end submerged in oil in the container you are bleeding into. And then there is a power vacuum bleed.
    If I do a job in 30 minutes it's because I spent 30 years learning how to do that in 30 minutes. You owe me for the years, not the minutes.

  4. #17
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    Mar 2015
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    Hamersville, Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by STEVEusaPA View Post
    You could’ve damaged the nozzle line surface where it mates with the nozzle if it was over tightened.

    Following up on what @ TechmanTerry said:
    It could also be excessive heat left in the chamber, combined with the insertion depth issue.
    You can check for excessive heat with a k type thermocouple, the kind you use with an electric meter (wire with a little bead on the end).
    Slip it into the air tube near the nozzle, attach to meter. Run the burner for a cycle (10-15 min), shut it down, see what the temperature is, and does it climb.

    Another option, is to add on an oil valve, non delay, between the pump outlet and the nozzle line.
    Also proper bleeding of a fuel pump requires you use a tube attached to the bleeder and the other end submerged in oil in the container you are bleeding into. And then there is a power vacuum bleed.
    Hos 4:6 My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge. Because you have rejected knowledge, I will also reject you, that you may be no priest to me. Because you have forgotten your God’s law, I will also forget your children.


    "You've got to Stand for Something or You'll fall for anything" (A. Tippin)


    Mat_15:24 But he answered, “I wasn’t sent to anyone but the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Cincinnati, Ohio
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    How do you know you have afterdrip versus impingement? Also, oil burners are supposed to be slightly down hill.
    captain CO

  6. #19
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    Jan 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Davis View Post
    How do you know you have afterdrip versus impingement?
    I guess we'll never know without draft, smoke, and a full combustion test.
    If I do a job in 30 minutes it's because I spent 30 years learning how to do that in 30 minutes. You owe me for the years, not the minutes.

  7. #20
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    Aug 2002
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    Every time you change the nozzle or filter you put air in the system. This can take up to a week or more to purge, unless you know how to outgas the filter. Also, 2-line systems are famous for cavitation and air separation which contributes to afterdrip.

    Delayed afterdrip (heat migrating back into the air tube) is caused by negative pressure problems and can be determined by a draft test.
    captain CO

  8. #21
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    Mar 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Davis View Post
    Every time you change the nozzle or filter you put air in the system. This can take up to a week or more to purge, unless you know how to outgas the filter. Also, 2-line systems are famous for cavitation and air separation which contributes to afterdrip.

    Delayed afterdrip (heat migrating back into the air tube) is caused by negative pressure problems and can be determined by a draft test.
    Amen!
    Hos 4:6 My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge. Because you have rejected knowledge, I will also reject you, that you may be no priest to me. Because you have forgotten your God’s law, I will also forget your children.


    "You've got to Stand for Something or You'll fall for anything" (A. Tippin)


    Mat_15:24 But he answered, “I wasn’t sent to anyone but the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”

  9. #22
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    Mar 2015
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    Medford, N.Y.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Davis View Post
    Every time you change the nozzle or filter you put air in the system. This can take up to a week or more to purge, unless you know how to outgas the filter. Also, 2-line systems are famous for cavitation and air separation which contributes to afterdrip.

    Delayed afterdrip (heat migrating back into the air tube) is caused by negative pressure problems and can be determined by a draft test.
    Jim Davis!!!! I don't know about that week or so of getting rid of some pesky air pockets, I'm more used to 168 hrs or so.

    Good info!!!!

  10. #23
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    Mar 2015
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    Hamersville, Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechmanTerry View Post
    Jim Davis!!!! I don't know about that week or so of getting rid of some pesky air pockets, I'm more used to 168 hrs or so.

    Good info!!!!




    Hos 4:6 My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge. Because you have rejected knowledge, I will also reject you, that you may be no priest to me. Because you have forgotten your God’s law, I will also forget your children.


    "You've got to Stand for Something or You'll fall for anything" (A. Tippin)


    Mat_15:24 But he answered, “I wasn’t sent to anyone but the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”

  11. #24
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    PA
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    Thread Starter
    Sorry I haven't replyed, its been a busy week. This burner is having an after drip. I checked the operation with a mirror when its running and shuts down. Ill have to get a borrow a kit and run a combustion test.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

  12. #25
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    Feb 2019
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    New Jersey
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Davis View Post
    Every time you change the nozzle or filter you put air in the system. This can take up to a week or more to purge, unless you know how to outgas the filter.
    Are you referring to purging the air from the filter canister via the 5/16” hex head screw on top of filter canister after changing cartridge? Just curious I haven’t heard of that term/method


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  13. #26
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    Aug 2002
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    Cincinnati, Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuckinSoot View Post
    Are you referring to purging the air from the filter canister via the 5/16” hex head screw on top of filter canister after changing cartridge? Just curious I haven’t heard of that term/method


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Outgassing the oil cartridge or filter has been written in the Sundstrand/Suntec Field Handbook for 40 years or more, It discusses after you do your normal purge to close off the tank valve and pull a vacuum on the filter for a couple of minutes.
    captain CO

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