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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Michigan's Upper Peninsula
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    14
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    Thread Starter
    There is probably no record of any water maintenance, I think they gave up on that when somebody retired!

    As for circulating cleaner, I have thought of that, but if a few tubes are restricted more, who knows how they will clean, to get flow through them you would need to pump a lot, especially if all the ones that are flowing good get clean?

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by thomas m View Post
    There is probably no record of any water maintenance, I think they gave up on that when somebody retired!

    As for circulating cleaner, I have thought of that, but if a few tubes are restricted more, who knows how they will clean, to get flow through them you would need to pump a lot, especially if all the ones that are flowing good get clean?
    May take a whole weekend for each boiler.
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  3. #16
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Salt Lake City/Tooele
    Posts
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    Quote Originally Posted by thomas m View Post
    "You need to punch the water side and clean the tubes and the noise will disappear. "

    I agree, but how do you recommend doing that on 1983 Unilux flexible water tube boilers?
    I may be wrong on this but where I work we have quite a few massive steam and boiler plants (power houses). I have had the opportunity to assist the main power house guys with the process of removing, cleaning, replacing, or reinstalling the tubes. It takes specialized tools but we access the main manifold where all the tubes are mounted. And remove the tube clamps, then with proper tooling pop the tubes out of the manifolds, the tubes are then power brushed and cleaned or replaced as needed. We then reinstall the tubes back into the manifold with another set of special tooling. Not easy work.
    I just dug up something similar to what we were doing on-line here:
    https://www.bryanboilers.com/pdfs/In...%20rev%201.pdf

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Columbia, MD
    Posts
    5,576
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    It should have a barometric. Need to open it up and rod it and replace as needed.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Michigan's Upper Peninsula
    Posts
    14
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    Thread Starter
    These boilers are installed in an attic, I think barometric dampers wouldn't make much of a difference here.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Columbia, MD
    Posts
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    How else can you maintain the proper draft? Draft is always changing.

    I have barometrics installed on equipment described like yours


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  7. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Medford, N.Y.
    Posts
    5,039
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    I was taught that mineral deposits build up and form a layer over the metal. The layer traps the transfer of heat causing that problem.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    up in the hizzy
    Posts
    3,122
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechmanTerry View Post
    I was taught that mineral deposits build up and form a layer over the metal. The layer traps the transfer of heat causing that problem.
    That is absolutely right! seen it happen all the time, call a company that specializes in boilers, the tubes could be cleaned using a machine, by hand or using chemicals as last resource.
    There is not better place for the working men than the union! 100% UA the only HVAC union!

  9. #22
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Salt Lake City/Tooele
    Posts
    4,983
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechmanTerry View Post
    I was taught that mineral deposits build up and form a layer over the metal. The layer traps the transfer of heat causing that problem.
    I learned this early on in my hydronic days with the infamous Munchkin modcons. Those things drove me nutty with the 100% failure rate of the HX.

    https://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread.php?1550051

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