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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Dearborn MI
    Posts
    356
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by servicefitter View Post
    Chrysler radial compressor along with alco peanut expansion valves what a quality setup. Thanks for bringing up night
    Most of the old theaters had an 8 cylinder Chrysler radial in them.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    38
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by crazzycajun View Post
    That sounds like a lot of experience talking good and bad
    CMP in Oklahoma was able to help me out, their prices were reasonable and are shipping the products to me today, should have them in kalifornia by Friday or Monday at the latest. There was only one part they could not get, a plastic spacer bushing that goes between the journal and the motor. I can machine one, just don't know what kind of plastic it is, I will be using delrin.

    Once I removed the gulled aluminum from the crank, the surface looks perfect. It was the connecting rod that took the hit. The plastic sump tube is in good shape. Although I have not miked the cylinder walls, there is no ridge. The bearing set, two connecting rods, an oil pump/bearing mount, and gaskets are being replaced, my cost for the parts approximately $one fifty, don't know if we are allowed to give numbers here. The reeds appear to be in good shape, no discoloring.

    What I don't know is exactly what killed the compressor. It has no low pressure switch, which I will be adding. It had a leak, pumped all of the 404A out, had a vacuum when I got there, so the compressor ran and ran with no refrigerant until it seized up. It could have been an oil pump problem, although the two fingers or brushes and their mating surface looked ok. As said, the pump is getting replaced anyway. The only parts not getting replaced, the housing, the motor, the crank shaft,the valve plate, and the oil of course.

    It's good to know about CMP, as the local distributors in Sacramento were no help, only sold new. BTW, the minimum charge with CMP is only $ twenty.

    I want to thank everybody for commenting on this project. This is the first semi that I have had to get into, almost all refrigeration compressors I work with are hermetic. I would have replaced it with a hermetic but they are simply too tall, wouldn't fit.

    Jim - empirical technology

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    14,726
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by remanworld View Post
    Most of the old theaters had an 8 cylinder Chrysler radial in them.

    .
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Dearborn MI
    Posts
    356
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by emptech View Post
    CMP in Oklahoma was able to help me out, their prices were reasonable and are shipping the products to me today, should have them in kalifornia by Friday or Monday at the latest. There was only one part they could not get, a plastic spacer bushing that goes between the journal and the motor. I can machine one, just don't know what kind of plastic it is, I will be using delrin.

    Once I removed the gulled aluminum from the crank, the surface looks perfect. It was the connecting rod that took the hit. The plastic sump tube is in good shape. Although I have not miked the cylinder walls, there is no ridge. The bearing set, two connecting rods, an oil pump/bearing mount, and gaskets are being replaced, my cost for the parts approximately $one fifty, don't know if we are allowed to give numbers here. The reeds appear to be in good shape, no discoloring.

    What I don't know is exactly what killed the compressor. It has no low pressure switch, which I will be adding. It had a leak, pumped all of the 404A out, had a vacuum when I got there, so the compressor ran and ran with no refrigerant until it seized up. It could have been an oil pump problem, although the two fingers or brushes and their mating surface looked ok. As said, the pump is getting replaced anyway. The only parts not getting replaced, the housing, the motor, the crank shaft,the valve plate, and the oil of course.

    It's good to know about CMP, as the local distributors in Sacramento were no help, only sold new. BTW, the minimum charge with CMP is only $ twenty.

    I want to thank everybody for commenting on this project. This is the first semi that I have had to get into, almost all refrigeration compressors I work with are hermetic. I would have replaced it with a hermetic but they are simply too tall, wouldn't fit.

    Jim - empirical technology
    Jim,
    Make sure that you check dimensions before you begin. It is not uncommon to have cylinders oversized or crankshafts turned undersized. CMP can provide you with the proper dimensions. Make sure that your wrist pins are the the same O.D. because are there 1/2 inch and 5/8 inch sizes, depending on the age of the compressor. What is the serial number of the compressor? Older ones had cast pistons with no rings while newer versions have aluminum pistons with rings. You must align the pump drive plate with the crankshaft slot before installing the bearing head. You must replace the o rings on the oil pick up tube to prevent trouble. DO NOT attempt to reuse the orings, it's not worth it. The main bearings are thin wall brass finish bore and are VERY difficult to install. If you do not press them in perfectly straight they will distort and the crankshaft will not go in or be very hard to turn. If the shaft does not spin freely do not proceed until it does. Brass bearings will not "wear in", they will seize up and spin in the casting. Good luck, please let us know how it turns out. Most guys never come back with "the rest of the story", but it would be nice to know.

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