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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    New Jersey
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    Thread Starter
    They do run 24/7
    They are cast iron in-line pumps on potable.
    All pipes are insulated with 1" thick fiberglass (although I can definitely take temps down the line)
    *We take weekly water temps and when we do I get 107 at far end 118 down by water heaters. I'm inside my mandated limits (no lower than 105 and no higher than 120 in New Jersey Assisted living/long-term care)

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    New Jersey
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    Thread Starter
    yeah I only have temp gauges on that system. I may stick some flow meters in.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    105-125f. Perfect for breeding legionellas.
    Low head-high flow circ. If your reading 107 at the end, how do you not have hot water?
    At a couple hundred ft ?? of piping , youll be on the left side of the pump curve and very low flow.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by NotUrAverageJoe View Post
    They do run 24/7
    They are cast iron in-line pumps on potable.
    All pipes are insulated with 1" thick fiberglass (although I can definitely take temps down the line)
    *We take weekly water temps and when we do I get 107 at far end 118 down by water heaters. I'm inside my mandated limits (no lower than 105 and no higher than 120 in New Jersey Assisted living/long-term care)
    New regulations require 140°minimum tank and supply lines for legionnaires control...... Especially in assisted living facility's. Reduce at the source to no higher then 120°F

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    New Jersey
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    Thread Starter
    The tanks are 147degrees and 120 from the mixing valve to the rooms, with new aerators that claim to not retain any water.
    getting away from original topic. The original question was if There would be any reason why I couldn't put a bigger faster return circulation pump in place of an existing 1/12hp?

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    You can do that. You risk pipe erosion, increased power consumption, noise. Balancing is the step that is missed usually. I see larger pumps get installed, due to your type issues. Often the wrong type pump again. Proper evaluation is needed.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    New Jersey
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    Thread Starter
    I appreciate the help. Now I have some kind of direction. Thanks to everyone ✌️

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by NotUrAverageJoe View Post
    I appreciate the help. Now I have some kind of direction. Thanks to everyone
    I am NOT recommending a flow increase.
    I still say, verify correct sizing, then balance / change if necessary, then balance .

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by NotUrAverageJoe View Post
    The tanks are 147degrees and 120 from the mixing valve to the rooms, with new aerators that claim to not retain any water.
    getting away from original topic. The original question was if There would be any reason why I couldn't put a bigger faster return circulation pump in place of an existing 1/12hp?
    Then how are you getting 128* at the heater?

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Northern Wisconsin
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    You're initial question was whether you could push water faster to the end of the building and then later said that the water temps at the end of the building are within the specs you need to maintain. Can you elaborate on why you want to move the water faster to the end of the building if what you have now is doing what is required?

    You're loosing temp along the length of the run due to losses through the insulation. Adding more gpm to the flow through the loop will definitely bring the temp at the end up, but the risk you run is damage to the piping if you exceed a certain flow rate (ft/sec) of the hot water.

    I would suggest that before you arbitrarily replace the circulators with something "larger" you bring in a plumber to look the system over and give their recommendations.
    Use the biggest hammer you like, pounding a square peg into a round hole does not equal a proper fit.

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