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  1. #1
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    Cold weather manometer

    My digital isnÂ’t worth a crap in cold weather. I occasionally need differential readings, not just positive readings. WhatÂ’s the solution? Is there a u tube or incline manometer that uses glycol as a fluid? Thanks.

  2. #2
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    my boss thinks its possible to repeal the laws of physics

  3. #3
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    Magnehic gauges are good in the cold also. No fluid to mess with.

    They make compound ranges also.

    I have a -5” to +5” dual port that has served me well for over a decade.

    2310 model with the A-432 portable case kit is what I have.

    Id guess all in under 200

    http://www.globaltestsupply.com/pdfs..._datasheet.pdf


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  4. #4
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by ch4man View Post
    Dang it, those u tube are a pain. Maybe I will go that way. Spose my slack tube isn’t meant to take red oil?

  5. #5
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    Thread Starter
    [QUOTE=heatingman;25619165]Magnehic gauges are good in the cold also. No fluid to mess with.

    They make compound ranges also.

    I have a -5” to +5” dual port that has served me well for over a decade.

    2310 model with the A-432 portable case kit is what I have.

    Id guess all in under 200

    http://www.globaltestsupply.com/pdfs..._datasheet.pdf


    Sent from my iPhone using


    This is exactly what I had in mind. You use it on gas I presume? The carrying case must offer good protection, I’m told dropping these will kill them?

  6. #6
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    How cold are we talking? My Fieldpiece digital hasn’t had any issues to speak of. I’ve used it down to about 15*F.
    “I haven’t failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” - Thomas Edison

    “It’s not whether you get knocked down, it’s whether you get up.” - Vince Lombardi

    "In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics" - Homer Simpson

  7. #7
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    [QUOTE=Shreadhead;25619168]
    Quote Originally Posted by heatingman View Post
    Magnehic gauges are good in the cold also. No fluid to mess with.

    They make compound ranges also.

    I have a -5” to +5” dual port that has served me well for over a decade.

    2310 model with the A-432 portable case kit is what I have.

    Id guess all in under 200

    http://www.globaltestsupply.com/pdfs..._datasheet.pdf


    Sent from my iPhone using


    This is exactly what I had in mind. You use it on gas I presume? The carrying case must offer good protection, I’m told dropping these will kill them?
    Yes. I use for gas, vacuum and air testing.

    You dont want to drop them, but they handle bonking around on a shelf in the van just fine.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  8. #8
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by rider77 View Post
    How cold are we talking? My Fieldpiece digital hasn’t had any issues to speak of. I’ve used it down to about 15*F.
    -22f would be ideal. I have an sdmn 5 and It’s stated accuracy is only for 32f and above. I noticed in cold weather it loses calibration/zero quickly.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shreadhead View Post
    Dang it, those u tube are a pain. Maybe I will go that way. Spose my slack tube isn’t meant to take red oil?
    if your slack tube is built for water, then no oil woint work. the oil has a different specific gravity than water.
    but..... dywer has oil slack tubs as well;

    i've never use a magnehelic so I didnt think of one. at least with either one you wont need batterys
    my boss thinks its possible to repeal the laws of physics

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ch4man View Post
    It does expand and contact quite nicely with temperature changes, so re-zeroing as it warms up or cools off will be necessary.

  11. #11
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by ch4man View Post
    if your slack tube is built for water, then no oil woint work. the oil has a different specific gravity than water.
    but..... dywer has oil slack tubs as well;

    i've never use a magnehelic so I didnt think of one. at least with either one you wont need batterys
    Too bad they don’t just make a different scale meant for red dye that would fit into your slack tube.

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