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  1. #14
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    Dec 2007
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    Okay so this is right up my alley and so far there has not been too much great information. Like pecmsg said if that freezer door can be on the inside of the cooler then that will help with humidity in the freezer and frost build up but that's not really a huge deal, especially if it's in a conditioned space. If it's not in a conditioned space make sure that the freezer door has a door switch on it to drop the solenoid out when that door is open. When these drawings get sent to a Walk-In engineer they will draw it with a combo wall between the cooler and freezer which is what you want.

    You can just drop the cooler on a normal slab. BUT, unlike what others have said....you NEED an insulated slab under the freezer. DO NOT put that on an un-insulated slab!! Do it once and do it right. It might take two months or it might take ten years but that floor will heave and you will be left with a huge headache and a pissed off customer. Please see page ten of attached https://www.everidge.com/wp-content/...-2017-1101.pdf . Pretty much three layers of R-28 insulation surrounded by vertical 2 x 8's. Those 2x8's need to line up underneath the freezer wall panels to seperate the warm from the cold. Let me know if you have any questions.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
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    The triangle in the Keystone
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    As I understand it, it’s important to bring the temp in the freezer down gradually to prevent the concrete from cracking. I remember a thread a little while back where the tech took more than a month to get the box down to temp. Dropping the temp by ten degrees every few days.

  3. #16
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    Dec 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by VanMan812 View Post
    As I understand it, it’s important to bring the temp in the freezer down gradually to prevent the concrete from cracking. I remember a thread a little while back where the tech took more than a month to get the box down to temp. Dropping the temp by ten degrees every few days.
    It is important to drop it down slowly but shouldn't take a month unless there is a crazy amount of humidity in the concrete. Typically we run them at 40 degrees for two days to pull the humidity out, then drop it to 10 for two days and then set at desired temp.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Madison, WI
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    IIAR Standard 5 has Appendix G: (Informative) Temperature Reduction Procedure for Newly Constructed Cold Storage Areas for guidance on pull down. Its written for 100,000 sq ft facilities but concrete is concrete.

    The summary is take it down 10F ever 24 hours until you hit 35F. Hold at 35F until the evaps are frost free for at least 24 hours and then continue dropping.

    I use this even on old facilities that sat at ambient temps for several months.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Southold, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by DehuDan View Post
    IIAR Standard 5 has Appendix G: (Informative) Temperature Reduction Procedure for Newly Constructed Cold Storage Areas for guidance on pull down. Its written for 100,000 sq ft facilities but concrete is concrete.

    The summary is take it down 10F ever 24 hours until you hit 35F. Hold at 35F until the evaps are frost free for at least 24 hours and then continue dropping.

    I use this even on old facilities that sat at ambient temps for several months.
    That’s fine but how do I take a System that’s designed for -20* evap temp and make it operate at
    50
    40
    30
    For 3 days.
    It gets set at 30* for 24 hrs at best!

  6. #19
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    Dec 2018
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    Last edited by Special-K; 12-11-2018 at 10:28 AM.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Madison, WI
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    Quote Originally Posted by pecmsg View Post
    That’s fine but how do I take a System that’s designed for -20* evap temp and make it operate at
    50
    40
    30
    For 3 days.
    It gets set at 30* for 24 hrs at best!
    I don't disagree. Its not always easy. The standard was written for much larger warehouses with robust controls that typically has a trained tech on duty.

    I do use this method as a start up for seasonal ice arenas, though. There its just controlling glycol/calcium brine temp. Even arenas that are decades old tend to absorb a lot of moisture over the summer. Following this gets a lot of that moisture out and help prevents ceiling condensation during ice making.

  8. #21
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    Aug 2002
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    Southold, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by DehuDan View Post
    I don't disagree. Its not always easy. The standard was written for much larger warehouses with robust controls that typically has a trained tech on duty.

    I do use this method as a start up for seasonal ice arenas, though. There its just controlling glycol/calcium brine temp. Even arenas that are decades old tend to absorb a lot of moisture over the summer. Following this gets a lot of that moisture out and help prevents ceiling condensation during ice making.
    With glycol that possible!

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