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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    8,097
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    Guess I will try again.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    615
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    We use them a lot. More for swaging though. Flares do work but look sketchy at first. You need a good drill with a high rotational speed and it helps to preheat the copper if you have a weaker drill. Saved my butt when I was short one coupling on an out of town job. Really pays for itself on big jobs with multiple flares and swages. A silicone cooking glove is good for gription and also heat resistant.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    In the Conservatory with a Lead Pipe
    Posts
    15,683
    Post Likes
    I use a smaller od reround hole of a pinch off tool to grip the tubing for a swedge. Keeps it from turning and you can pull into your drill. It's like a perpendicular handle.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    PNW!! gotta love Oregon
    Posts
    71
    Post Likes
    I use these type of flare / swage tools, I found that on the flares I always use nylog on the mating surface and it makes nice flares that so far have not leaked. the moving parts respond well to nylog but you have to use just a little drop as it gets all over if you make a few flares between wiping it down after use. I don't think you will be unhappy with your results.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    3,446
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by Achso017 View Post
    Good to know. I admit I didn’t even try to use them. They all looked lopsided and uneven. I didn’t think they had a snowballs chance in hell of holding 600 psi of nitro.
    I have both the swage and flare kits. They seem to work just fine. I will agree with the flare tool, but I've found you must use a high speed, high power drill, and keep the tool spinning at full speed while removing it completely from contact with the copper, or else you'll end up with a funky looking result. I also use a very light coat of oil and a deburring tool before using the spin tool.

    The friction heat is part of the design in order to make the copper more malleable to prevent cold material cracking. I would suggest allowing the copper to cool slowly, opposed to cooling it with a cold rag. I realize using oil may reduce the heat a bit, but it makes the 7/8" possible. Most drills can't handle the torque necessary.
    Their site claims it's for soft or hard copper and aluminum. I've only used it on soft copper.
    I have the original "Spin Tools" brand, not sure what the other brands are like.

    Would I suggest this tool??? Absolutely! I use them very frequently for several years now. The only thing I use my flaring block for is rounding out copper, or holding 7/8" when I swage it, because it gets really hot.
    "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing" Socrates

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