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  1. #1
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    Dishwasher Water Pressure Regulators

    So, we just had a new Jackson RackStar 44 dishwasher installed by a local commercial kitchen equipment vendor. It was a complete turnkey job. They even hauled off the old dishwasher and arranged for an authorized service company to do the startup.

    One of the things I noticed and I asked him during the startup was why the final rinse water pressure was showing 33 PSI and shouldn't it be between 15-20 PSI like every other dishwasher we have in the school district. He said he wasn't sure, but he would call the manufacturer. Odd that the startup guy didn't know the answer, don't you think? Anyway, later he called me after he finished the startup and told me that Jackson said that the machine needed a water pressure regulator installed and set to 15 PSI.

    I emailed the vendor who installed the machine and he replied that none of the new dishwashers come with pressure regulators any longer and that not having one shouldn't be a problem, other than using more water.

    So, I called Jackson technical support. The told me that the machine did need a pressure regulator and until it is installed, we should not be using the machine. I asked why not and he said if something happened to the machine under warranty it could be a problem if it didn't have the pressure regulator installed.

    Then, I read the installation manual and found this very vague and poorly written paragraph. Well, it does have an exclamation point beside it, so I guess that means it's important. Even though, I'm still not completely convinced a pressure regulator is really needed.

    What do y'all say?
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  2. #2
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    By health codes, the pressure's gotta be inscribed somewhere on a sticker affixed to the machine. TEMPS and PRESSURE must be on there for the user to see.

    While I have SOME clue about the importance of proper pressure, this write-up covers it quite adequately:

    RINSE WATER PRESSURE IS CRITICALLY IMPORTANT, TOO

    All hi-temp machines will have a sticker or plate on them somewhere that says that the rinse water pressure must be between 15-25 PSI. Some will say, “20 PSI, +/- 5”, which means the same thing.

    Why is this important? I asked one manufacturer about this, and was told that if the pressure is too low, the water comes out in thick streams that will not cover every inch of the dishes as they go through, leaving hard-to-reach places unsanitized. If the pressure is too high, the spray turns into a mist that is too fine to raise the temperature, much like the misting systems used in backyards and outdoor restaurants — even if the water in the hose is warm, the resulting mist produces evaporation that cools off the surface it lands on. That’s not the desired effect inside a dish machine.

    Make sure the rinse pressure gauge on your machine is functional, and make sure it is in the proper range, whether your health department inspector brings it up or not. 18 PSI is the optimal pressure.

    (Credit to THIS for the statement: https://purozone.com/maintenance-new...8m55l2r13zegvu

    I think you knew that.

    Regarding the machine's LACK of a PRV, here's that dishwasher's manual:

    Page 3 shows a revision that states the regulator is OPTIONAL...which to ME, is a bunch of B.S. JACKSON should certainly know that virtually NO house pressure is THAT low, so they should supply the regulator WITH the machine to get it there.

    As for the knucklehead who started it up. Either DOESN'T CARE about his work...or is a newbie in the biz.

    Either way, sounds like Jackson is taking a nosedive in their product quality and customer satisfaction. I don't know. They lost me six years ago after my attendance of a training seminar...then their acquisition by Hoshizaki.
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  3. #3
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    From what I’ve seen, if the machine has a built in booster it will come with a water pressure regulator. If it’s sold without than it doesn’t have one. For instance I installed an Insinger Speeder 64 and a CMA EST/44 not too long ago and they had a booster already installed AND a regulator. I put in another CMA and a Moyer Diebel MD66 this summer and neither of those and booster built in nor did they come with regulators.

    Should the tech have known what the pressure should be? Maybe. It’s hard to know all the specs on all this equipment though, even something as basic as rinse pressure. It wasn’t too long ago that pretty every commercial dishwasher had a standard 15-25 rinse psi spec. Now there all over the place. Jackson Avengers and Tempstars don’t want anything above 11 psi. Moyer Diebel is like 18-22 or something. So it’s hard to know it all but he could have easily found out by reading the tag on the machine.

    Your machine definitely needs to have the proper pressure. It was designed a certain way and going away from that won’t give you the result you want. Plus, boosters are sized for a certain amount of water flow. If it’s too high the booster won’t be able to recover fast enough, among other things. Best to get the pressure within spec.


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  4. #4
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    Jackson replacement this past spring
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    Jackson replacement this past spring
    Isn't there another one for the booster ?

  6. #6
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by ECtofix View Post
    By health codes, the pressure's gotta be inscribed somewhere on a sticker affixed to the machine. TEMPS and PRESSURE must be on there for the user to see.

    While I have SOME clue about the importance of proper pressure, this write-up covers it quite adequately:

    RINSE WATER PRESSURE IS CRITICALLY IMPORTANT, TOO

    All hi-temp machines will have a sticker or plate on them somewhere that says that the rinse water pressure must be between 15-25 PSI. Some will say, “20 PSI, +/- 5”, which means the same thing.

    Why is this important? I asked one manufacturer about this, and was told that if the pressure is too low, the water comes out in thick streams that will not cover every inch of the dishes as they go through, leaving hard-to-reach places unsanitized. If the pressure is too high, the spray turns into a mist that is too fine to raise the temperature, much like the misting systems used in backyards and outdoor restaurants — even if the water in the hose is warm, the resulting mist produces evaporation that cools off the surface it lands on. That’s not the desired effect inside a dish machine.

    Make sure the rinse pressure gauge on your machine is functional, and make sure it is in the proper range, whether your health department inspector brings it up or not. 18 PSI is the optimal pressure.

    (Credit to THIS for the statement: https://purozone.com/maintenance-new...8m55l2r13zegvu

    I think you knew that.

    Regarding the machine's LACK of a PRV, here's that dishwasher's manual:

    Page 3 shows a revision that states the regulator is OPTIONAL...which to ME, is a bunch of B.S. JACKSON should certainly know that virtually NO house pressure is THAT low, so they should supply the regulator WITH the machine to get it there.

    As for the knucklehead who started it up. Either DOESN'T CARE about his work...or is a newbie in the biz.

    Either way, sounds like Jackson is taking a nosedive in their product quality and customer satisfaction. I don't know. They lost me six years ago after my attendance of a training seminar...then their acquisition by Hoshizaki.
    As usual, you're the man! Thanks for the link, too. Everything you posted is exactly how I feel about the whole ordeal. Jackson definitely dropped the ball by not including one on the machine or, at least, sending one to be installed in the field. Now, I have to use funds from my limited parts budget and my time to install the regulator. The vendor/installer is doing a CYA by saying it shouldn't be a problem. But, you know what? It's just a thing and as I always say, "job security!" Ha! Ha!

    Oh, and BTW, you're right. It's right there on the data plate...15 PSI.
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  7. #7
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    Jackson replacement this past spring
    That's a vacuum breaker.
    With your chrome heart shining in the sun, long may you run.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by SandShark View Post
    That's a vacuum breaker.
    You are correct the regulator IS down by the control box. It's coming back to me now. The customer wanted me to remove it after replacing that vacuum breaker because his hand sprayer would drop in pressure when the machine cycled.

  9. #9
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    Thread Starter
    Here it is...
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    With your chrome heart shining in the sun, long may you run.

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  11. #10
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    That's PURDY! Easy to remove for future replacement, too. Good work!
    ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° °

    "You never know what others don't know." -

    If I can't laugh at myself...then I'll laugh at YOU! -

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