Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 56
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Rochester, NY, USA
    Posts
    16,473
    Post Likes

    Kind of disturbing

    In the last couple of days, I have been to a couple different supply houses, Rheem, American Standard and Goodman.

    what I find disturbing is I never seem to see any young people at these places. Every time I go to a warehouse there just seems to be "old guys" running around.

    The youngest guys I see are in there 30 and up?

    Just how much trouble is our industry in? Im going to retire in 2 to 3 years. There is no one to take my place. Im simply going to sell off my tools and whatever inventory is left and wonder off into the sunset, a WARM SUNSET
    PANIC
    Rarely works

  2. Likes armandomartinez liked this post
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Northern NV
    Posts
    2,002
    Post Likes
    Which side of the counter?

  4. #3
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Rochester, NY, USA
    Posts
    16,473
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by Juan Madera View Post
    Which side of the counter?
    tech side, now that you mentioned it, most places do have older counter guys. which is ok because they have the experience to know what you might need on a job
    PANIC
    Rarely works

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
    Posts
    25,786
    Post Likes
    Ill be 64
    My sons 39

    When were at classes or trade showed there is that same 20 year gap.

    What your going to find is how much your going to be worth after retirement.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,102
    Post Likes
    Thats a good thing for the paycheck. High schools push everyone into college. And Cut technical education we had woodshop, autos, metals 1, metals 2 the high school was remodeled and i believe most were cut. But they got a really nice field house and a new pool......

    Sent from my SM-G920R4 using Tapatalk

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Fontana, Ca
    Posts
    131
    Post Likes
    You are partially correct.
    Nowadays, schools always preach to young kids that going to college is the way to go. That the way to go has to involve a long amount of school leading up to a master's or a doctorate in a given professional White collar field.
    What our society doesn't realize completely is that, manual labor is still much needed and that mastering a given trade will get you far--and in some instances further than those who dedicate themselves to a University leveled job.
    You need to do your part and encouraging the younger generation once you retire. The pressure is all on you. Our future generation needs you and your wisdom!!

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

  8. #7
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Rochester, NY, USA
    Posts
    16,473
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by pecmsg View Post
    I’ll be 64
    My sons 39

    When we’re at classes or trade showed there is that same 20-year gap.

    What your going to find is how much you're going to be worth after retirement.
    Im 64 too. Im going to sell 'almost' everything except my hand tools. we plan on joining the growing "Full-time RV" movement
    PANIC
    Rarely works

  9. #8
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Rochester, NY, USA
    Posts
    16,473
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by armandomartinez View Post
    You are partially correct.
    Nowadays, schools always preach to young kids that going to college is the way to go. That the way to go has to involve a long amount of school leading up to a master's or a doctorate in a given professional White collar field.
    What our society doesn't realize completely is that, manual labor is still much needed and that mastering a given trade will get you far--and in some instances further than those who dedicate themselves to a University leveled job.
    You need to do your part and encouraging the younger generation once you retire. The pressure is all on you. Our future generation needs you and your wisdom!!

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
    Honestly, I wonder how much of this "you must go to college" BS is motivated by money for the college. I mean most colleges require you to take BS courses that have nothing to do with whatever your major is
    PANIC
    Rarely works

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Fontana, Ca
    Posts
    131
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by jmac00 View Post
    Honestly, I wonder how much of this "you must go to college" BS is motivated by money for the college. I mean most colleges require you to take BS courses that have nothing to do with whatever your major is
    "BS classes" exactly my point.

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Fort Myers, FL
    Posts
    56
    Post Likes
    I am 24 just starting in the field (close to 1 year experience) and learn something new every day between field work, other techs, and here and online vids/articles. I dont know about other companies but where I work most of us installers are young. 20s and 30s. A couple older 30s.. service side a few young and also some older guys. Mainly residential/light commercial install/service. But honestly were in need of experienced workers. Hard to find people that have over 5 years experience in the trade..


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  12. Likes armandomartinez liked this post
  13. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    317
    Post Likes
    In San Diego there are all range of ages on the tech side of the counter. On the sales side they seem younger or at least mid 30 to 40s, with a couple of older guys sprinkled in.

    But i went to Palm Desert for a job we did out there and the supply houses were full of older guys who left the field for one reason or another and knew their stuff to where you could bounce ideas off of them. That was definitely a new experience for me, as Im sure 95% of the counter guys here were never techs.

    As for older techs, we have a guy whos getting ready to retire next year when her turns 65. I know a couple guys who are pushing 70 but dont really want to stop working because they will probably die if they do. One guy I know is at least 70 but would run circles around most guys in their 20s. But then you have my current service manager who is 72 and going senile and refuses to retire because he is in so much debt. He also said he has no plans to retire, me and some other guys told him its gonna be hard to be a service manager with no service guys to manage.

  14. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    317
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by HVACNat018 View Post
    I am 24 just starting in the field (close to 1 year experience) and learn something new every day between field work, other techs, and here and online vids/articles. I don’t know about other companies but where I work most of us installers are young. 20’s and 30’s. A couple older 30’s.. service side a few young and also some older guys. Mainly residential/light commercial install/service. But honestly we’re in need of experienced workers. Hard to find people that have over 5 years experience in the trade..


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Its not hard to find them. The problem is that most guys with experience and are employed are happy where they are at and it would take a significant pay increase to make them leave. Even then they'd probably just use your offer to get a raise at their current company and you'd still be short a guy. Ive had companies offering me jobs and when I give them a rate they have to beat for me to leave they never call me back.

  15. Likes HVACNat018 liked this post
  16. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Fort Myers, FL
    Posts
    56
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by MT1 View Post
    Its not hard to find them. The problem is that most guys with experience and are employed are happy where they are at and it would take a significant pay increase to make them leave. Even then they'd probably just use your offer to get a raise at their current company and you'd still be short a guy. Ive had companies offering me jobs and when I give them a rate they have to beat for me to leave they never call me back.
    Makes sense


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •