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Thread: Bending pvc

  1. #1
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    Bending pvc

    Working on a Mitsubishi hyper heat install, the job I ranted about the GC on actually. Coming along nice, i'll have some more pictures tomorrow maybe. First time installing ceiling cassettes and trying to stick to the install manual probably a little too much. For drains they specify O.D. 32mm, 1 1/4" pvc tube, which after multiple phone calls I finally confirmed through Mitsubishi what they mean is what we all know as 1" pvc, for grouped piping they specify O.D. 38 mm, 1 1/2" pvc tube, which was confirmed to mean 1 1/4" pvc. I did my research before asking and the conversions don't really work out from metric to SAE but I was assured 1" & 1 1/4" was plenty adequate. So, instead of doing what a more rational and less sleep deprived person would do and use 1 1/2" pvc, I got some rare 1 1/4". Had an oversight routing the drain overhead and missed one rafter at the low end of the drain that was 2x6 instead of 2x4. Reroute. Don't have the right fittings to match the roof pitch and no one has 1 1/4" fittings, especially at 6 PM. So I've seen videos about bending pvc for years but never really had a need for it. Broke out the heat gun and gave it a go. Man did that feel good on my frozen hands! Got 2 spots a little too hot, have it a toasted marshmallow color, on my first attempt but ended up over bending one and had to make another one anyways. May be child's play to some of you, but i'm pretty proud of the results and have a new tool for my arsenal and skill to perfect. I went nice and slow and barely deformed the pipe. Maybe it's not WOP material, but i'm still proud of it.
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    "If common sense was so common, everyone would have it."

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  3. #2
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    Try heating it then use a tubeing bender might make it easer for you and get purfect bends every time as long as you bend it before it cools to much

  4. #3
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    As far as the bending goes you did a nice job on your first try

  5. #4
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    Just something I discovered on the ductless drain lines... the 1-1/4" they are referring to is outside dimensions. So 1" is fine. At least that was on Fujitsu systems.
    Can someone please explain to me -
    Why is there never enough time to do it right the first time, but plenty of time to do it twice?


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  6. #5
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by joemach View Post
    Just something I discovered on the ductless drain lines... the 1-1/4" they are referring to is outside dimensions. So 1" is fine. At least that was on Fujitsu systems.

    Same with Mitsubishi. Really if you think about it it makes more sense than our method of sizing. O.D. stays the same while I.D. depends on wall thickness. Just a little confusion.
    "If common sense was so common, everyone would have it."

  7. #6
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    I haven’t done it but I’ve seen others use seal tight for their drains and I suppose as long as it doesn’t dip anywhere to create a trap then it would work good, and you can bend it however you wish to haha.


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