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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Vancouver, B.C.
    Posts
    261
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    Quote Originally Posted by MT1 View Post

    Also when they say you get paid to learn in the union that's not exactly true. You work during the day and generally go to school two nights a week. That's really no different than taking classes at your community college after work. You dont get paid to be at school. Yes you should be learning while you're working on a job but I just dont like the way its presented.
    Maybe it depends on the area that you are in...
    I am in the union and In my area we stop work for the entire duration that we are in school for our apprenticeship training. School is 5 days a week full time for 2 or 3 months at a time (I think... it's been a while so I may be off by a few weeks either way). The school is paid for when we go and that includes books. We are on employment insurance while we are off work so we have financial income during that time. The financial assistance isn't union specific, I got that too when I was getting my sheet metal ticket and I wasn't union at that time.

    If we want to take extra curricular training then that is paid for as well by the union. The company I'm with pays our full hourly rate with benefits while we are training. These courses are a week long some times. I'm not sure if the union reimburses them for our wages, I always thought it was a perk of being with this employer but with hearing comments from other people recently I'm starting to question that. Either way, it would be worth looking into if or when you are in that position.

    Quote Originally Posted by MT1 View Post
    Also many union shops will keep you as a tradesman/pre apprentice for a year or two before they put you in. It's basically a way so they dont have to commit to paying you more and sending you to school regardless of what you know. It's kind of shitty but that's why I dont work for those companies, also the one that's known for doing that here wouldn't hire me.
    In my area, once we are indentured then we set our own dates for schooling. We work with the employer to make sure we aren't leaving during a busy time but we are typically the ones that make the phone call and set it up. Im not sure if the employer can deny us training once we have enough hours. Perhaps someone else knows their rights on that. Usually the thing that delays us from getting in is trying to schedule schooling too late, after the classes have all filled up.




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  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    249
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    Yea you guys do things way differently. Our school schedule follows a basic college semester. We start in the last week of august or first week of september and finish first or second week of june for the year. We have 4 classes during that time. 2 in the fall and 2 in the spring. We go twice a week at night. The day varies but we get the schedule for the year before hand. We dont have any control over what days and the curriculum is already set.

    The only guys that go for a an entire day at a time are the First year Plumbers and Steamfitters. Granted they aren't always working like service guys so it doesn't seem to matter to them.

    Quote Originally Posted by thatguy View Post
    Maybe it depends on the area that you are in...
    I am in the union and In my area we stop work for the entire duration that we are in school for our apprenticeship training. School is 5 days a week full time for 2 or 3 months at a time (I think... it's been a while so I may be off by a few weeks either way). The school is paid for when we go and that includes books. We are on employment insurance while we are off work so we have financial income during that time. The financial assistance isn't union specific, I got that too when I was getting my sheet metal ticket and I wasn't union at that time.

    If we want to take extra curricular training then that is paid for as well by the union. The company I'm with pays our full hourly rate with benefits while we are training. These courses are a week long some times. I'm not sure if the union reimburses them for our wages, I always thought it was a perk of being with this employer but with hearing comments from other people recently I'm starting to question that. Either way, it would be worth looking into if or when you are in that position.



    In my area, once we are indentured then we set our own dates for schooling. We work with the employer to make sure we aren't leaving during a busy time but we are typically the ones that make the phone call and set it up. Im not sure if the employer can deny us training once we have enough hours. Perhaps someone else knows their rights on that. Usually the thing that delays us from getting in is trying to schedule schooling too late, after the classes have all filled up.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    portland, oregon
    Posts
    7
    Post Likes
    I would start sending out aplications before school. I was hired with 0 existing education as an install hekper in 2008.. now im a senior service tech. Boss flew me all over the country and paid for my education. just an idea

  4. Likes HVACNat018 liked this post
  5. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Sumter, SC
    Posts
    148
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    Quote Originally Posted by sav1984 View Post
    I actually did apply for the UA apprenticeship and was denied (they said there weren't enough openings, which could be true). Earliest I can re-apply would be sometime in January, I believe. Meantime, I'm still looking at schooling options. Tech school is a lot more expensive but shorter ($18-20K and 7-9 months). State college is longer and a lot cheaper (1-2 years depending on day or evening classes and about $5k).
    I am currently a HVAC/R student at a local community college in South Carolina. At one time, I worked for the state approving TRA applicants training applications. One very important thing I learned there is "for profit" schools should be avoided if possible. A state technical college is going to cost much less and those credits will be transferable, whereas most for profit schools credits are not.

    Two things you should check out and each school has to provide is what is their placement rate. IE, how many people are working in the industry they trained for. Secondly, what is the average salary of those trained by that school in that particular industry.

    I believe you will find as I did, the state ran technical college is a much better value. Be aware that for profit schools have some great salesmen that paint a beautiful picture of their facility and programs. The state ran school isn't going to go out of its way to sell you their program but you dollars are better spent there.

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