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  1. #27
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    Will they approve a DX coil to provide the cooling ?

  2. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    Will they approve a DX coil to provide the cooling ?
    If the current situation doesn’t get resolved, I’m going to push for those two MUA units to be replaced with MUA units with integrated DX cooling. Of course, I would suggest an outside contractor be brought in first to ensure it’s feasible to do so.
    With your chrome heart shining in the sun, long may you run.

  3. #29
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    Here are what the exhaust hoods look like. You can see how the face of the hood is at an angle where the make-up air exhausts. This angle is what causes the air to move away from the hood and blow on the staff when they're prepping and serving food.
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    With your chrome heart shining in the sun, long may you run.

  4. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2sac View Post
    I'm gonna guess there is one branch for each 3 panel section. I've seen similar in restaurants but they have all been conditioned. I'm under the impression, the air does NOT require, by local code, conditioning, if it is dumped under the hood. That air is being dumped into the kitchen, and would be conditioned if it were in Chicago.
    This ^^^^
    That style hood surely required conditioned make-up.
    Is there a manufacturer plate on those hoods ?

  5. #31
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    The tables close to the hoods are food prep tables. The entire kitchen needs balanced not just the hoods. Until you know where the air is going and how much is supplied and exhausted you are not likely to solve your problems. With belt driven fans the total airflow is adjustable but it needs measured first. At this point for all you know the airflows could have been adjusted and are all out of whack.
    s was stated previously most hood make-up air is not conditioned except in cold climates most is heated.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

  6. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    This ^^^^
    That style hood surely required conditioned make-up.
    Is there a manufacturer plate on those hoods ?
    I think that style would be OK (or at least more tolerable) if they don't try to supply all of the makeup air from the hood and used fresh air intakes from the air conditioners to supply as much as possible.

    But as you mentioned before - the behind the equipment makeup air design is the best and least costly to operate : you just lose valuable kitchen space by doing that. :Grin:

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

  7. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by WAYNE3298 View Post
    The tables close to the hoods are food prep tables. The entire kitchen needs balanced not just the hoods. Until you know where the air is going and how much is supplied and exhausted you are not likely to solve your problems. With belt driven fans the total airflow is adjustable but it needs measured first. At this point for all you know the airflows could have been adjusted and are all out of whack.
    s was stated previously most hood make-up air is not conditioned except in cold climates most is heated.
    I agree there should be a air flow check first. Who knows if the make-up is twice that of the exhaust. Also I'm in a lot of commercial kitchens and here in Cleveland I can think of very few that have expensive conditioned. Now the national chain restaurants almost always but not your average owner/operator.
    Here's a Red Lobster. Guess how much that cost versus a sheet metal box with a blower wheel and motor.
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    Last edited by VTP99; 11-08-2018 at 11:57 AM.

  8. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by shellkamp View Post
    I think that style would be OK (or at least more tolerable) if they don't try to supply all of the makeup air from the hood and used fresh air intakes from the air conditioners to supply as much as possible.

    But as you mentioned before - the behind the equipment makeup air design is the best and least costly to operate : you just lose valuable kitchen space by doing that. :Grin:

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
    This may be his only option if the powers that be are tight on budget.

  9. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    This may be his only option if the powers that be are tight on budget.
    Feels fine in their office!

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

  10. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by shellkamp View Post
    Feels fine in their office!

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

    The truth has been told !

  11. #37
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    An example of the things that happen iI got a frantic call from an owner whose restaurant was full of smoke and customers were leaving. He said I don't care what you charge as long as you fix it now. When I checked his exhaust fan the belt was so loose it barely turned the fan. I tightened the belt and the fan motor overamped. Turns out a day or two before an electrician replaced the fan motor and not knowing how to adjust the fan sheave he loosened the belt until the belt slipped enough to not overload the motor. The belt wore and as the fan slowed down the entire building filled with smoke. The fix was as simple as adjusting the sheave, turning off the MAU and opening the front doors until the building cleared. Those things happen and don't expect someone to tell you they did anything or what was done. You need the equipment to find those problems.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

  12. #38
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    I like the ones where the motor was changed but the rotation was not checked.
    How about cycling on the overload because it was left on 220 when the supply was 110 ?
    Manufacturers wire them this way for the unknowing.

  13. #39
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    I got called back to a water plant where an entire 3 phase panel had been changed and a whole series of exhaust fans were running backwards. The design engineer called me and ask if I would meet him at the plant. He knew me and knew I wouldn't have left it like that. When we got there sure enough a lot of fans were running backwards. When I told the operators I didn't leave it that way the response was a likely story. I ask if any electrical work had been done since I did the balance they told me the panel had been changed. I had them switch two of the 3-phase wires on the panel and all was good.
    Balancers can tell by the sound when a fan is running backwards and our rotation check is conformation. The fans make too much noise, draw too many amps and deliver around 60% of the design airflow.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

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