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  1. #14
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    I would imagine that if/when CO2 becomes mainstream, the enviro-whackos would be up in arms. Claiming that it was contributing to an increase in CO2 in our atmosphere. And they would be correct on that point.

    Because CO2 used in HVACR is 'artificially' made, by something like dripping acid on lime. It is not scrubbed from the byproduct of other processes. Therefor, any CO2 used in HVACR will contribute to atmospheric CO2.

    Pretty funny when you think about it!


    Quote Originally Posted by thatguy View Post
    To be fair, when R410a came out one of the manufactures was up front and honest about it not being a solution but rather a stepping stone in the right direction while they look for a better product that is less harmful. I suspect that is how they are going to try and sell this one to us also. Why find a single solution that works when you can find five solutions, that also work and make more profit... I guess that is one way to go about it.

    When is co2 going to make its way to commercial and residential units?



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

  2. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    I would imagine that if/when CO2 becomes mainstream, the enviro-whackos would be up in arms. Claiming that it was contributing to an increase in CO2 in our atmosphere. And they would be correct on that point.

    Because CO2 used in HVACR is 'artificially' made, by something like dripping acid on lime. It is not scrubbed from the byproduct of other processes. Therefor, any CO2 used in HVACR will contribute to atmospheric CO2.

    Pretty funny when you think about it!
    And here I thought they had a good way to use a natural occurring byproduct that they could collect by scrub it out of the air to reuse. They would be tickling two cats with one feather with that product and method (or two birds with one stone if you prefer).

    The high pressure doesn't really worry me. Everybody was scared to use R410a when it came out because it went up to 600 psi. Now it's common place. It would just take getting used to again.


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  3. #16
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    Is there any reason that CO2 can't be recovered from air? The way most gasses are? I would call the boys over at Air Products & Chemicals - they have always seemed like a bunch of can-do guys. <g> Although it's probably not cost effective - or that is my guess.

    Or how about just mandating the planting of plants? Plants take CO2 in for photosynthesis and expel O2 as a byproduct. Various kinds of algae are particularly effective at that because they don't invest much energy in biomass and sustaining structures. It seems like the best land-based CO2/O2 converter is either sugar beets or sugar cane - but I forget why. Maybe something to do with the sugar?

    PHM
    ----------


    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    I would imagine that if/when CO2 becomes mainstream, the enviro-whackos would be up in arms. Claiming that it was contributing to an increase in CO2 in our atmosphere. And they would be correct on that point.

    Because CO2 used in HVACR is 'artificially' made, by something like dripping acid on lime. It is not scrubbed from the byproduct of other processes. Therefor, any CO2 used in HVACR will contribute to atmospheric CO2.

    Pretty funny when you think about it!
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  4. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    Is there any reason that CO2 can't be recovered from air? The way most gasses are? I would call the boys over at Air Products & Chemicals - they have always seemed like a bunch of can-do guys. <g> Although it's probably not cost effective - or that is my guess.

    Or how about just mandating the planting of plants? Plants take CO2 in for photosynthesis and expel O2 as a byproduct. Various kinds of algae are particularly effective at that because they don't invest much energy in biomass and sustaining structures. It seems like the best land-based CO2/O2 converter is either sugar beets or sugar cane - but I forget why. Maybe something to do with the sugar?

    PHM
    ----------

    Anything is possible, or so I am told. Might be best effective to find a process that has a high CO2 exhaust and extract the gas from that instead of the air.
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

  5. #18
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    That is a smarter idea - the emitting process will already have concentrated the CO2. But now that you are making me think about it all again - I think the reason that this was not applied to coal burning was the cost to do it negated the low cost of the fuel.

    BTW: speaking of CO2 and so forth - it strikes me that I read that huge amounts of formerly atmospheric CO2 are somehow now sequestered under water - I guess in the oceans. And that rising sea water temperatures would somehow cause the now-sequestered CO2 to be released back into the atmosphere. But that's all I can remember about it. I can't remember what it is that 'contains' it now.

    Ever heard of that?

    PHM
    --------



    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    Anything is possible, or so I am told. Might be best effective to find a process that has a high CO2 exhaust and extract the gas from that instead of the air.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  6. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    Anything is possible, or so I am told. Might be best effective to find a process that has a high CO2 exhaust and extract the gas from that instead of the air.
    We have an Anhydrous plant nearby and CO2 is one of the byproducts. There is also a Ethanol plant and I believe CO2 is a byproduct there also.

  7. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    That is a smarter idea - the emitting process will already have concentrated the CO2. But now that you are making me think about it all again - I think the reason that this was not applied to coal burning was the cost to do it negated the low cost of the fuel.

    BTW: speaking of CO2 and so forth - it strikes me that I read that huge amounts of formerly atmospheric CO2 are somehow now sequestered under water - I guess in the oceans. And that rising sea water temperatures would somehow cause the now-sequestered CO2 to be released back into the atmosphere. But that's all I can remember about it. I can't remember what it is that 'contains' it now.

    Ever heard of that?

    PHM
    --------
    Sally sells seashells by the seashore.

    Core samples from the ocean have shown the thickness of shells increased dramatically correlating with periods of deep Core ice samples that showed higher CO2.

    There are probably other ways the ocean stores CO2 as well. On an interesting note, our oceans are the single largest producer of CO2 on this planet; as well as also being the largest source of sequestering CO2.
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

  8. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by BNME8EZ View Post
    We have an Anhydrous plant nearby and CO2 is one of the byproducts. There is also a Ethanol plant and I believe CO2 is a byproduct there also.
    How about our breweries? Wonder how much CO2 they do not collect and reuse for carbonation?
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

  9. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    To receive future news from Chemours™ Refrigerants, click here.

    We appreciate your ongoing support of Chemours as we continue to invest
    in developing and commercializing sustainable refrigerant solutions for our
    mutual benefit.

    Sincerely,

    Mark M. Kramer
    U.S. Sales Manager - Fluorochemicals
    Chemours™ Refrigerants
    -------------------------------------
    Chemours is a spin off of Dupont.....
    Follow the money....
    Life is too short, Behappy!
    TFMM

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