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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    central PA
    Posts
    2
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    i-Vu Controller has no power

    Hi all. Newbie here...1st post. I'm in Facilities Management for about 15 years (I am a senior technician). The guy that took care of all our i-Vu issues retired a few months ago. Unfortunately, no one saw fit to get anyone else trained or up to speed. So I am learning as I go.

    I have several RTU's and also UH's that are controlled through i-Vu. All had been working just fine. Now I have 6 units that are not communicating with i-Vu. The units run fine. It's the controllers that have no power. I've traced back all the wiring, and everything looks fine. This is NOT a bubble with a ? that shows on i-Vu when they are not communicating.....What I see on i-Vu is nothing and when I open up the controller, there is no power.

    Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    1,300
    Post Likes
    You've measured with a meter and the module has no power? Generally they get 24vAC from the unit they are serving but sometimes have their own transformer with associated fuse and breaker.
    Scott Jalbert
    WebCTRL ninja
    AX and Smartstruxure newb

    The S in IoT stands for Security

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    central PA
    Posts
    2
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Correct. They are 24vAC (UC Open BACnet Controller), and yes I used a meter, and have no power. I don't see anything that looks like a transformer (not to me anyway, but as I said I'm learning as I go).

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    415
    Post Likes
    If there's no power, you'll have to follow the wires back to figure out where the transformer is located. Like Max said sometimes we'll pickup power from the internal transformer on the equipment. If the wires don't go back to the equipment, you'll have to find the other one. Could be coming from an electrical closet, a transformer mounted on a J-box, or any other conveniently close place.
    Either the transformer is blown or a fuse or breaker is popped, either on the line side or the 24vac side.

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