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  1. #1
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    Any idea what I'm looking at here? Old plumbing-

    Doing some plumbing repairs for a friend. I'm an hvac guy so vintage plumbing practices I'm not always familiar with. For some reason the vanity trap was cut off- when I finally was able to jar the old straight piece that goes into the wall this is what I had left. Looks like some sort of bushing that goes into an 1 1/2 FIP- if it is i seem to doubt that it's a threaded bushing though because I don't see how they possibly could've gotten it flush with the FIP- doesn't look like a leaded joint as there's an obvious seem but lead work is before my time. Not sure If it's a tee or elbow so we'll just say FIP. I've contemplated that maybe I just tore the drain outlet out and it pulled/twisted with a clean break as there's some sort of ridge if you look close in the back. Just looking for a bode of confidence before I chisel or do what I have to do to get it out. Sure I could just stick my 1 1/2" tubular in it and silicone the snot out of it but my workmanship is against it even though it's free work for a freind. IMG_2212.JPGIMG_2213.JPGIMG_2214.JPGIMG_2216.JPGIMG_2217.JPG


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  2. #2
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    Looks like they got the bushing flush using a chisel ( unless that edged marking is from you ) as you can see a line of metal missing. From the yellow color line mark it looks to be a coated brass bushing?? Is that what your asking?

    Put a small magnet on that exposed section of the bushing to see if it's made of brass.

    If a chisel does not work to remove may need a dremel with a small flat wheel cutting into it then inwards like a " L" angel then chisel to peel off of threads then pull off the threads with vice grips/channel lock.

  3. #3
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    In regards to having lead in between the bushing, or anywhere in the general area run a sharp knife edge to see on suspected area. Not to hard to tell if lead is present.

  4. #4
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    It very well could be the remnants of the male portion of 1 1/2" or 1 1/4" tubular DWV and I somehow pulled/twisted it out clean from the inside and the remnant remains- the scratch does look like it could be chromed brass. I just wanted to be sure it wasn't some sort of weird antiqued pushed in bushing deal with some sort of sealant as I see what looks like pipe dope around the seam


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    "Never an always and always a maybe"

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bazooka Joey View Post
    In regards to having lead in between the bushing, or anywhere in the general area run a sharp knife edge to see on suspected area. Not to hard to tell if lead is present.
    You mean I should be able to scratch or flake it because of its relative softness?


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    "Never an always and always a maybe"

  6. #6
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    I am no plumber, but that looks like an old cast iron and oakum bell fitting. Like I said I am no plumber, and maybe just blowing steam. I live in an old 1918 house, and have had to remove a few.

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by technocratic View Post
    looks like an old cast iron and oakum bell fitting.

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    That's why I ask I have no idea what that is. Some sort of flush bushing?


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    "Never an always and always a maybe"

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dave1234 View Post
    You mean I should be able to scratch or flake it because of its relative softness?


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    Yes, talking about lead, heavy as all hell but fairly soft. Shiny silver color when cut.

  9. #9
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    I’m not sure what they were called, but way back when, I started out life as a plumber apprentice. We remodeled old college dorm bathrooms and every bathroom had one of these. The trick to getting them out? A fine tooth sawzall blade, a pry driver and a hammer. Wrap some black tape around the “handle” end of your blade and make cuts at 12, 3, 6 and 9 just to the threads.
    After all four cuts are made, take screwdriver, place at 6 o’clock cut at a 45* upward angle and give it a couple good whacks with said hammer and it should pop right out as they are brass. You may need to go to the other cuts and repeat as necessary, or you may be able to screw it out.
    Side note: after this job was complete, I found that the smell of sewer gas and rotting hair and whatever else was in the drains just wasn’t for me so I got in to HVAC. I guess these fittings are the reason I do what I do...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by frankhvac View Post
    I’m not sure what they were called, but way back when, I started out life as a plumber apprentice. We remodeled old college dorm bathrooms and every bathroom had one of these. The trick to getting them out? A fine tooth sawzall blade, a pry driver and a hammer. Wrap some black tape around the “handle” end of your blade and make cuts at 12, 3, 6 and 9 just to the threads.
    After all four cuts are made, take screwdriver, place at 6 o’clock cut at a 45* upward angle and give it a couple good whacks with said hammer and it should pop right out as they are brass. You may need to go to the other cuts and repeat as necessary, or you may be able to screw it out.
    Side note: after this job was complete, I found that the smell of sewer gas and rotting hair and whatever else was in the drains just wasn’t for me so I got in to HVAC. I guess these fittings are the reason I do what I do...
    That’s exactly what I did. Was so long ago but got it to yield if memory serves 1 1/4” FIP and the rest was ezpz

  11. #11
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    Once I started sawing I do believe it was brass

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by frankhvac View Post
    I’m not sure what they were called, but way back when, I started out life as a plumber apprentice. We remodeled old college dorm bathrooms and every bathroom had one of these. The trick to getting them out? A fine tooth sawzall blade, a pry driver and a hammer. Wrap some black tape around the “handle” end of your blade and make cuts at 12, 3, 6 and 9 just to the threads.
    After all four cuts are made, take screwdriver, place at 6 o’clock cut at a 45* upward angle and give it a couple good whacks with said hammer and it should pop right out as they are brass. You may need to go to the other cuts and repeat as necessary, or you may be able to screw it out.
    Side note: after this job was complete, I found that the smell of sewer gas and rotting hair and whatever else was in the drains just wasn’t for me so I got in to HVAC. I guess these fittings are the reason I do what I do...
    that was my thinking. cut and collapse inward, then new stuff threads in.
    Col 3:23


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  13. #13
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    Was never really concerned about how to get out but was more concerned that there was FIP waiting for me. There was.

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