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Thread: BLAM!

  1. #14
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    But that didn’t answer my question.
    What’s listed MOP on those units?
    “I haven’t failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” - Thomas Edison

    “It’s not whether you get knocked down, it’s whether you get up.” - Vince Lombardi

    "In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics" - Homer Simpson

  2. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    If you are working as a licensed contractor you could conceivably apply for pro membership on the site.

    Depending upon your background and experience you could use the link below in my signature area that says "how to become a pro member."
    I should clarify my position so we're all on the same page. I only worked on 1 businesses AC's (and my own of course). The building owner is my best friend and I have worked for him for 16 years. I do everything to keep his business and home running from septic systems to well systems and everything in between. When it comes to HVAC work I know my limitations. If it concerns the freon system we call in a licensed contractor with much distress. Every AC contractor has tried to pull punches on us. The one company that has a trustworthy technician keeps him so busy it's a month waiting list just to get him.

    I don't know why the HVAC companies (at least in the Dallas area) seem to be run like used car sales lots. Even the AC radio ads here warn you of the scam other AC companies try to run on you. So, in answer to your question I am not licensed, but do extreme quality work.

    As a last side note I am sure that 95% or better of the folks on this site are REPUTABLE. But every one knows that this industry has more than its share of undesirables. (at least in our experience in the Dallas area). Those folks are only out to scam folks, they are not for the betterment of the industry so joining a site like this goes against their grain, so to speak. This will probably be my last post so cheers to all

  3. #16
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    Thread Starter
    [QUOTE=rider77;25567635]But that didn’t answer my question.
    What’s listed MOP on those units?[/QUO

    20

  4. #17
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    Thread Starter

    FINAL

    UPDATE: Unit ran for about a week and then fuses blew again. Found a terminal connection inside of the safety switch that had been improperly set at the factory. This particular safety switch had the normal screws with which to tighten the hot lines to it but also had little nuts for each leg designed to hold the connection HOUSING secure. One of these was stripped. and should have been discovered upon install.

    After installing the new safety switch and powering it on the unit hummed for about 3 seconds then, Bang!, all 3 20amp fuses blew again. So I removed the top and carefully examined all electrical lines. Finally figured out the Blam sound was caused by a direct short. The red colored line connection at the compressor was cracked and burnt and had been twisted excessively under the plastic shroud covering the connection to the compressor.

    I clipped off the push on terminal and the burnt part of the wire, got a new one and re-installed. Upon the next startup the unit started humming, no fan turning so I stepped back, covered my ears and waited for the Bang. After about 4 seconds the fan finally started turning. At this point I believed the capacitor had developed issues so I replaced it as well and upon the next startup everything seemed normal. Unit was purring like it never has. So here's my hypothesis of the events. Please chime in unless you feel like your revealing to much to an DYI'er.

    1. Safety disconnect had one of three terminals in a position to allow a corrupted flow of energy to cross, some electricity, but not full power.
    2. The leg of power that was corrupted also was the leg with which the fan drew it's power so the capacitor was receiving abnormal surges of electricity as well.
    3. This corruption of power caused the fan to turn off and on, not the high limit switch system.
    4. This corruption of power (surging) also caused the red line to heat up un-naturally till the plastic shroud developed cracks at the compressor terminal.
    5. Upon continued corrupted startups, not receiving the correct amount of power the red connection got hotter and hotter, weakening the protective plastic wire shroud. The compressor finally got to a point where it could not start due to the years of corrupted starts and the red line being "hot" enough surged the electricity through shroud and grounded out because that power needed to go somewhere.

    Kinda reminded me of one of those Air Disasters episodes where a problem done years back finally corrupts a system and then a cascade of events happen leading to failure. This was a fun one!

  5. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amtrakusa View Post
    UPDATE: Unit ran for about a week and then fuses blew again. Found a terminal connection inside of the safety switch that had been improperly set at the factory. This particular safety switch had the normal screws with which to tighten the hot lines to it but also had little nuts for each leg designed to hold the connection HOUSING secure. One of these was stripped. and should have been discovered upon install.

    After installing the new safety switch and powering it on the unit hummed for about 3 seconds then, Bang!, all 3 20amp fuses blew again. So I removed the top and carefully examined all electrical lines. Finally figured out the Blam sound was caused by a direct short. The red colored line connection at the compressor was cracked and burnt and had been twisted excessively under the plastic shroud covering the connection to the compressor.

    I clipped off the push on terminal and the burnt part of the wire, got a new one and re-installed. Upon the next startup the unit started humming, no fan turning so I stepped back, covered my ears and waited for the Bang. After about 4 seconds the fan finally started turning. At this point I believed the capacitor had developed issues so I replaced it as well and upon the next startup everything seemed normal. Unit was purring like it never has. So here's my hypothesis of the events. Please chime in unless you feel like your revealing to much to an DYI'er.

    1. Safety disconnect had one of three terminals in a position to allow a corrupted flow of energy to cross, some electricity, but not full power.
    2. The leg of power that was corrupted also was the leg with which the fan drew it's power so the capacitor was receiving abnormal surges of electricity as well.
    3. This corruption of power caused the fan to turn off and on, not the high limit switch system.
    4. This corruption of power (surging) also caused the red line to heat up un-naturally till the plastic shroud developed cracks at the compressor terminal.
    5. Upon continued corrupted startups, not receiving the correct amount of power the red connection got hotter and hotter, weakening the protective plastic wire shroud. The compressor finally got to a point where it could not start due to the years of corrupted starts and the red line being "hot" enough surged the electricity through shroud and grounded out because that power needed to go somewhere.

    Kinda reminded me of one of those Air Disasters episodes where a problem done years back finally corrupts a system and then a cascade of events happen leading to failure. This was a fun one!

  6. #19
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    And STILL no information on the unit's MOP.

    Your description is an example of why those who are under-qualified (including those working as technicians) should not work on things that go BOOM!
    That is the basis for the NO DIY policy of the site.
    AOP Rules: Rules For Equipment Owners.

    Free online load calculator: http://www.loadcalc.net/


    There = not here. Their = possessive pronoun. They're = they are
    It's = contraction of it is. Its = the possessive form of it
    Too = also. To = expressing motion. Two = 2
    Then = after that, next. Than = indicates a comparison.
    Questions should end with a question mark "?" Statements end with a period "."

  7. #20
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    The answer was given earlier

    Quote Originally Posted by kdean1 View Post


    And STILL no information on the unit's MOP.

    Your description is an example of why those who are under-qualified (including those working as technicians) should not work on things that go BOOM!
    That is the basis for the NO DIY policy of the site.
    I guess you missed it.

  8. #21
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    What do you like / have to do with / about Amtrak?

    I have always romantically liked trains and pretty much everything to do with them. It sort of annoys me that the US Government hugely subsidizes trucking with tax dollars and abandoned the railroads.

    PHM
    ----------




    Quote Originally Posted by Amtrakusa View Post
    I don't know if this site is to restrictive so I'll just post and see what happens. I've been handling all types of electrical and plumbing issues for my job for the past 30 years. HANDYMAN. Should have become an electrican, but alas, where I'm at is where I'm at.

    So Saturday I'm cleaning 6 condensing coils for my main client. I remove the outer protective shell covering the coils for each unit and disconnect the fan motor wires (quick connect) and remove the top. Then with a pressure washer on medium pressure I blow the coils clean from the inside to the outside.

    The last unit, after re-assembly, and restarting there was a slight hum that may have come from the compressor but the fan did not start. So I put a screw driver in and flicked the fan blades thinking the fan was going out or maybe the capacitor. Two seconds later it sounded like an M-80 went off. (Side bar - 3 phase unit) I thought I saw some type of a flash in the bottom of the unit but the bang startled me so much I may have imagined it.

    Headed inside, no breakers trip. Checked the quick disconnect breakers and 2 of the 3 fiberglass Class RK5 fuses had blown.

    I pulled the cap protecting the leads going into the compressor and saw obvious moisture. Found no wires burned or cut. The sound of that bang led me to believe I would find something. I'm headed back there today to check compressor continuity and the capacitor. No way to get replacement fuses until tomorrow (Grainger's).

    Any ideas on that bang would be appreciated. There is also a transformer in the circuit area and I saw somewhere in my research today (sunday) a transformer could blow like that. I'll remove it as well and check it today. At least this building has 5 other units.

    Thanks to any and all.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  9. #22
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    I've been riding Amtrak since late 70's. Just a big Fan of trains in general, we ride Amtrak at least once per year, and my wife and I have criss-crossed the nation with our three boys in tow growing them up. It was a blast. They're now grown but our fondest vacations with them were the train trips. Cheers PHM!

    Better ride soon if your gonna. There's talk of removing some long distance trains. PS, always be prepared for your train to show up late, and arrive to your destination late. Go in OK with that and you'll have a blast!

  10. #23
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    I used to ride the Amtrak AutoTrain back and forth to Florida. The scheduling problem everywhere is that Amtrak shares tracks with ConRail and freight is the big profit center - so freight always get priority. Some right-of-ways are old and go through towns - with low speed limits. And high freight train weight beats the tracks to death and compromised tracks do not like high speed rail. <g>

    PHM
    ------------



    Quote Originally Posted by Amtrakusa View Post
    I've been riding Amtrak since late 70's. Just a big Fan of trains in general, we ride Amtrak at least once per year, and my wife and I have criss-crossed the nation with our three boys in tow growing them up. It was a blast. They're now grown but our fondest vacations with them were the train trips. Cheers PHM!

    Better ride soon if your gonna. There's talk of removing some long distance trains. PS, always be prepared for your train to show up late, and arrive to your destination late. Go in OK with that and you'll have a blast!
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  11. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amtrakusa View Post
    I guess you missed it.
    I see now that it is in post #16. It was hard to decipher because of the unclosed quote.
    AOP Rules: Rules For Equipment Owners.

    Free online load calculator: http://www.loadcalc.net/


    There = not here. Their = possessive pronoun. They're = they are
    It's = contraction of it is. Its = the possessive form of it
    Too = also. To = expressing motion. Two = 2
    Then = after that, next. Than = indicates a comparison.
    Questions should end with a question mark "?" Statements end with a period "."

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