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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    Multiple homes exploding in Massachusetts

    https://www.ksn.com/news/explosions-...sky/1440955339

    Might be doing work on the gas lines?????
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

    I know enough to know, I don't know enough
    Liberalism-Ideas so good they mandate them

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    in a house, Appomattox, Va.
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    I figured either arson, or gas pressure issues, since multiple at once.
    Col 3:23


    questions asked, answers received, ignorance abated

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Mn the state where absolutey nothing is allowed
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    last i saw 70 fires so far. yikes
    my boss thinks its possible to repeal the laws of physics

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Burlington , Mass
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    High pressure in main lines. 3 towns are without power/gas/electric. First explosion was a home, nothing left of that home.
    I'll be there when I get there and not a minute later

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    Billington Heights, NY
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    something as simple as a regulator (even if it's "not required") would have prevented all that.

    it's still not over. there will be failures not equating to explosions and/or some that are in the future in that area.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    something as simple as a regulator (even if it's "not required") would have prevented all that.

    it's still not over. there will be failures not equating to explosions and/or some that are in the future in that area.
    I wonder if they converted a 14" line to 60 PSI without checking the regulators on the existing meters?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    Billington Heights, NY
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    I cant tell you that. The only high pressure gas outside of 5 psi Ive seen was on the gas well at the farm. It was, on average, 230 psi.

  8. #8
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    Jul 2012
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    WA
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    I just read this story...scary.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    Columbus, Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    I cant tell you that. The only high pressure gas outside of 5 psi Ive seen was on the gas well at the farm. It was, on average, 230 psi.
    Most municipal gas networks run in the 40-80 PSI range and are regulated at the meter. Some small district systems run at less than 1 PSI, but it's more rare because it requires larger pipes to service the customers. 5 PSI is the max allowed inside a building, and it requires special regulators with overpressure devices installed on them.

    2 PSI is becoming more common inside houses, because it doesn't require OPDs, but this also means that a pressure spike could take out the regulators inside the building which have vent limiters installed per code. A regulator without a vent limiter would simply pop and dump through the vent, which is why they are usually located outside - but on a 2 PSI system, the vent limiters mean that the popped regulator is just going to dump into the appliances instead.

    I think this is the most plausible scenario, since the one guy in the article said his boiler was glowing and setting off the smoke alarm - probably everyone with a standing pilot got a blowtorch inside their appliance, or the pilot was blown out and the gas leaked into the space to cause an explosion.

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  11. #10
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    Mar 2013
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    Billington Heights, NY
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    Your head would explode here. We have low pressure mains in the WC range as the norm here and meters with no regulators. 2 psi-5psi is not common except in our very new subdivisions, in larger cities or in large commercial and industrial.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
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    New York
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    I cant tell you that. The only high pressure gas outside of 5 psi Ive seen was on the gas well at the farm. It was, on average, 230 psi.
    There's a 60#+ line that runs down Delaware Ave downtown and extends past Kenmore Ave.
    Oh, and I have 5 psi to my house... in the sticks!
    -----Stop, step back, relax and have another go at it.-----

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  14. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    Billington Heights, NY
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    You should run 5 psi to the outside will and then step down to a turbine meter. You can run anything you want after that

    Thanks for the info about downtown where I refuse to work. (No parking)

  15. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Chariton, Iowa
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    I have been looking around Lawrence via Google street view and I'm not seeing any obvious regulators on the meters. Check out 99 Jordan Street. https://www.google.com/maps/@42.7000...7i13312!8i6656

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