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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    4
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    What do I need to become a tech in DFW Texas?

    Hi guys,

    I want to make a career switch and get off the road so I can work close to home in DFW. I have 10 years experience with industrial wind turbines. Constructing, troubleshooting, servicing, SCADA, etc. HVAC seems like a good fit for me and I think I would be good at it. Commercial HVAC is what I would be leaning towards. Heavy machinery is what I like to work on. I'd stay in my current industry if I could but I can't do the 100% travel gig any more. Kids, house, wife, etc.

    Anyway, I've done a bit of googling and couldn't really get a good idea of what certs or courses I need to have with me for an interview.
    Do I need to go to school for 6 months? I'd rather shadow somebody and be a helper and get actual experience than take classes.
    Most job postings I see mention an EPA card is required but when I look up how to obtain the card it says you need 48 months of field work.

    If somebody could point me in the right direction of what exactly I need to get so I can get my foot in the door that would be great.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
    Posts
    16,107
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aeromech84 View Post
    Hi guys,

    I want to make a career switch and get off the road so I can work close to home in DFW. I have 10 years experience with industrial wind turbines. Constructing, troubleshooting, servicing, SCADA, etc. HVAC seems like a good fit for me and I think I would be good at it. Commercial HVAC is what I would be leaning towards. Heavy machinery is what I like to work on. I'd stay in my current industry if I could but I can't do the 100% travel gig any more. Kids, house, wife, etc.

    Anyway, I've done a bit of googling and couldn't really get a good idea of what certs or courses I need to have with me for an interview.
    Do I need to go to school for 6 months? I'd rather shadow somebody and be a helper and get actual experience than take classes.
    Most job postings I see mention an EPA card is required but when I look up how to obtain the card it says you need 48 months of field work.

    If somebody could point me in the right direction of what exactly I need to get so I can get my foot in the door that would be great.
    http://www.ua.org/locals

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,433
    Post Likes
    Start applying to helper jobs. I believe with the heat Texas has seen this year they are in desperate need of help right now

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    Posts
    4,061
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    Aero, put your email in your profile, I have some job opportunities I can send you.
    Quote Originally Posted by MatrixTransform View Post
    very soon it is you that will be pwned

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    4
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    Thread Starter
    Joey, I updated my profile to show me email address. Thanks.
    I'm going around to some shops today and hand delivering my resume.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    13
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    I don't think the "48 months of field work" to get the EPA card is accurate. EPA Section 608 Technician Certification is what you're after if you want to read up on the requirements. Unless something has changed recently, you just have to pass an exam to get certification. There are various study guides available, or formal schools/training programs will cover the material as well. The EPA wants you to have this certification before you work with refrigerants (there is an exception for supervised apprentices). It might help to get your foot in the door, or not, but you'll definitely need it eventually.

    I second the recommendation to check out the UA if you're close enough to a Local - I'm way too far out in the sticks to do it, but I hear the training is the best, and they get to work on all the big equipment. If not, apply for helper jobs. The right attitude might be more important than credentials for getting in with a company. Your turbine construction/service/troubleshooting experience may be valued by potential employers and may help you learn this trade more quickly, but don't come across as a "know it all" who can't be taught anything new. Convey an eagerness to learn from an experienced mentor, an understanding that you will be starting over at the bottom, and a willingness to do the grunt work like carrying tools or roping them onto the roof for your mentor to make his job easier, and you'll more likely look like a good long-term investment and potential future asset to an employer.

    Good luck on the job hunt and career transition. I made a major career change by entering the trade a year and half ago - best decision I ever made!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    4
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    Thread Starter
    I went down to the local UA last week and got an application. They aren't taking new apprentices until next year in August. Brandt was taking applications for plumbers. I'll fill it out and see what happens over time.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
    Posts
    16,107
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aeromech84 View Post
    I went down to the local UA last week and got an application. They aren't taking new apprentices until next year in August. Brandt was taking applications for plumbers. I'll fill it out and see what happens over time.
    Its worth the wait!

    Get a list of contractors and apply directly, once employed they only have a few months before you have to join!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    Posts
    4,061
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    Aero, I sent you 2 jobs to apply for, good luck.
    Quote Originally Posted by MatrixTransform View Post
    very soon it is you that will be pwned

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