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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
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    I bring a 10 foot A frame ladder to reach these units. It is a big challenge, and you have to be willing to quote the man hours needed.
    Last edited by timebuilder; 08-19-2018 at 10:47 AM.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist
    Member, IAEI

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  2. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    East Side
    Posts
    6,692
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    It’s easier, and you can do a better job, removing the side panels and using the coil gun wand and water hose wands to get right up against the face of the coils.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    2,156
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    Make sure its not running backwards, I have seen a unit that would cycle on and off a few times and maybe 1 outta 5 times after the unit the call for cooling kicked back in, the fan would be running full speed backwards.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    31,434
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    Quote Originally Posted by psehunter View Post
    Make sure its not running backwards, I have seen a unit that would cycle on and off a few times and maybe 1 outta 5 times after the unit the call for cooling kicked back in, the fan would be running full speed backwards.
    These are three phase fans.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist
    Member, IAEI

    AOP Forum Rules:







  5. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Prattville, Alabama
    Posts
    3,517
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    I seem to remember being on one of these and finding that one of the condenser fan contactors had a 24 volt coil, while the rest had 120 volt coils. I think that one was powered directly from a board relay.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
    Posts
    24,451
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    Since you have multiple similar units, if all else fails, you can switch parts from one unit to another. See if the problem follows the part or stays with the unit. It's an effective technique for intermittent problems.
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Chicago, IL.
    Posts
    3
    Post Likes
    Something else to consider - the condenser fan motor could be going bad. Put your amp clamp on it to see if your amps slowly increase. It could be going off on thermal overload.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    1,248
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    Jump the fan contactor out isn't the motor protected by its own breaker if not a thermal overload

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    1,248
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    Have a ir thermometer shoot the motor and compare it to others after shutting unit off or pull fan guards and touch th e motor with a probe they run hot. Look at motor name plate if you can see it see if its discolored and compare it with others.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    1,617
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    Were all the contactors pulled in for the condenser fans when this happened? If so, it went out on thermal overload.
    -----Stop, step back, relax and have another go at it.-----

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