Page 16 of 17 FirstFirst ... 691011121314151617 LastLast
Results 196 to 208 of 217
  1. #196
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    16,150
    Post Likes
    Yeah but soon or later your gauges will have the yellow goo because someone else has.

  2. #197
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Where we mow our own grass
    Posts
    6,673
    Post Likes
    There’s a bunch of stores around here that another contractor used to do. Every rack has dye in it.

  3. #198
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    16,150
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike19 View Post
    There’s a bunch of stores around here that another contractor used to do. Every rack has dye in it.
    And your ok with that ?

  4. #199
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Where we mow our own grass
    Posts
    6,673
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    And your ok with that ?
    No I’m not ok with it. The dye makes a big mess.

    The previous contractor is the source of a lot of problems.

  5. #200
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
    Posts
    22,140
    Post Likes
    If the rack is labeled I don’t have a problem. The store has a set of gauges.

  6. #201
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    16,150
    Post Likes
    The last time I had to deal with the goo it seemed to be everywhere, coming out every orifice, on my hands, clothes .....

  7. #202
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    2,739
    Post Likes
    have to take into consideration the piece of equipment being talked about here .....

    a system with a 5 oz charge might be losing just .25 oz / year, that is a 20 % refrigerant loss in 4 years, dye might be the best practical way to find a leak that small ...... supposedly an H10, according to Bbeerme could locate it, but maybe not, depending on where it was ..... what if it only leaked when it was running in the piping buried inside the cabinet, or when the evaporator coil was cold ? just saying on a domestic refrigerator who really cares ..... I wouldn't, just wipe what little dye there was off, my understanding is all compressor manufacturers approve it

    on larger equipment you would not even notice a .25 oz / year loss, probably would not even notice a 6 oz / year loss

    but then that is the exact reason I stay away from domestic refrigerators ..... trying to find a tiny leak on a system with a tiny charge.... a 5 oz charge, give me a break ...

    but we all have our preferences ...
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing." (hvacrskills)


    II CORINTHIANS 3:6

    “Who also hath made us able ministers of the new testament; not of the letter, but of the spirit: for the letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life.”

    the spirit of the law

    The intended meaning of a law by those who wrote it, as opposed to a literal interpretation thereof.

  8. #203
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Phoenix,AZ
    Posts
    3,615
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike19 View Post
    There’s a bunch of stores around here that another contractor used to do. Every rack has dye in it.
    Sounds like the ones we used to do. It was great. Didn't even have to bust out with the leak detector or climb inside the cabinet and tear the evap apart. A quick peak into the condensate pan's revealed the leak source. These were multi delfield evaps that leaked often. Nothing wrong with dye anyways. IMO

  9. #204
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    1
    Post Likes
    I've read a few of these pages, not the whole thing, so I'm not completely sure what you've done yet aside from replacing the evaporators. I've done hundreds of these machines and have a tip for you. Cut out those crimps on the cap tubes. The fridge will make a bit more noise as the refrigerant flows, but if you replace the black mastic dampener, it will be negligible. Before you cut the crimps out, cut the cap tubes off the evaps and grab them with a pair of channel locks on the tip. Pull. It will get you a few more inches from the cabinet. You can score the cabinet with a razor in a straight line down from where they exit to make this less nerve racking. Then clean the cap tube and cut the crimps out. Insert the cap tube 1-2 inches into the evap. If you have to cut the 90 degree bend off the evaporator to facilitate this, do it. Only time I've ever partially restricted an evap is when I either left the crimp in, or didn't insert it far enough and brazed it too long. I've replaced one cap tube for a freezer evap in four years. Not saying it isn't that, since it seems like someone mucked around in the system previously, but it's rare. Once you are done with all that, make sure to park the three way valve in the both evap position. You can do this by activating test one off the main, or by unplugging the unit for 15 seconds, plug it back in and wait until you see the condenser fan come on. Then unplug it. You can then pressure check and vacuum both evaps.

  10. #205
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    68
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Thanks for the tips. I have been chatting with a few LG techs and they sent me some LG bulletins about running new cap tubes down thru the drain hose and then you have to wrap the cap tube around suction line to form a heat exchanger next to the compressor. And another authorized LG method was to run a new insulated suction line and cap tube on the back exterior of the case.
    And a few techs have come up with a method to remove the problematic linear compressor and replace it with a fixed speed compressor.
    They used the 5 volt DC condenser fan circuit to trigger a relay to start and stop the compressor since the fan is started anytime the mainboard turns on the inverter circuit.
    So when I get time I think I am going to try the fixed speed compressor method.
    Here is a video how this guy did one.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZJ0EZE3tx8

  11. #206
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    23
    Post Likes
    Just following up on my story, which was the same refrigerator, but after replacing the dead compressor and the filter, the freezer was working fine, but the refrigerator part was not cooling.

    I re-did the refrigerator cap tube, cutting 2" off at the outlet of the 3-way valve. That did not solve the issue.

    I wanted to make sure the 3-way valve was not the culprit, so I by-passed it, running both cap tubes straight from the filter outlet.... The issue persisted...only refrigerator was cooling.

    Then I looked at the other side of the cap tube .... at the evaporator and cut off the crimped part... After reassembling, vacuuming and recharging .... it all worked great.... for 2 whole weeks! Then the same thing started happening again ... this time in the freezer! The temps went up and then the freezer stopped cooling completely, while refrigerator kept working fine.

    So I went in again and did the same thing in the freezer .... cutting off the crimped part of the cap tube and after nerve wrecking brazing in the freezer box with almost no room to work in....success! I've just recharged it 2 hours ago and the temps are going down in both the freezer and the refrigerator box.

    And just for some of the "Pros", who had no usable advice, but lots of negativity, criticizing and ego ... take example from "brkbeatsci", who actually came up with a real, helpful advice and got it right. Too bad I read his comments after I had already finished the project ... the hard way .... :-)

    Anyway, it was a great experience and I hope "Houptee" will fix his refrigerator sucessfully as well!

  12. #207
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    68
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Good to hear RobCLT that you got it cooling again.
    I already had cut off those crimps on mine when I did the evaporator replacements.
    Yes that is a pain in the ass to braze in the tight area up against the plastic liner and the freezer is worse.
    That's why I used low temp Stay Brite 8 silver solder and not a brazing torch.
    I had a scrap of fiber cement siding that I used as a shield behind the fittings but still burned it a bit even with low flame. But after the fan covers and all the shelves and drawers are back in you cant even see the back of the fridge anyway.

  13. #208
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    16,150
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by RobCLT View Post

    And just for some of the "Pros", who had no usable advice, but lots of negativity, criticizing and ego ... take example from "brkbeatsci", who actually came up with a real, helpful advice and got it right. Too bad I read his comments after I had already finished the project ... the hard way .... :-)
    No worries, you'll be back at it again in 2 weeks, keep us posted.

Page 16 of 17 FirstFirst ... 691011121314151617 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •