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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    Columbia, MD
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    Re-piped an old boiler

    This boiler had all kinds of issues and could never get rid of the air.

    Wish I took before pics.

    Here is how we repiped it.

    All new piping, spirovent, backflow, prv, ex tank, oil lines




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  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Washington, DC
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    Prior to leaving residential I always enjoyed piping boiler and did a lot of repiping as well. As you know damn near every one you come across is piped wrong, wrong expansion tank and pump configuration, no or wrong purge set up, etc.

    I can’t see it actually on the piping but your drawings lay it out nice. Looks good and I’m sure they’ll have a nice quiet system (Waterside. The burner is another conversation but the AFG isn’t too bad.) now.
    Regards,
    Ron

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Michigan
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    Beautiful work! That is a boiler I would like to service. Nice clean solder joints. Pipping schematic is perfect. Customer will be happy😁

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
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    7
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    Is the little "u" of pipe just after city water valve for movement, like a Hartford loop, or is it just because the existing valve was lower than you needed by a half inch or something?

    Looks great.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Billington Heights, NY
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    I dont like your sticker

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Maple Grove, MN
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    The only nit-pik I have is where the copper goes into the steel. If you would have changed the black reducing couplings to brass, it would have been a lot better.

    This has to do with electrolysis. I can't explain the whole science behind it, but when you connect copper and steel together it can cause the steel to rust out really fast and leak at that point. Using brass (or dialectic unions) between the copper and the steel will act as a buffer between the 2 metals to help prevent this.

    Oh wait, I have another nit-pik... It would be nice to see isolation valves on top of those zone valves and maybe unions to make changing them out easier.

    Other than that, it does look good. You did a nice job with the soldering. Also, the gauges on each side of the pump is a nice touch.
    Last edited by ammoniadog; 08-21-2018 at 02:45 AM.
    If at First You Don't Succeed, Skydiving Is Not for You.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Broomall, PA
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    1,766
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    You usually don't have to worry about oxygen corrosion or electrolysis on a closed hydronic system. Steel to copper happens all the time with no problem.
    Uh...Google it yourself!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    Columbia, MD
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by dnr View Post
    Is the little "u" of pipe just after city water valve for movement, like a Hartford loop, or is it just because the existing valve was lower than you needed by a half inch or something?

    Looks great.
    Its because it was to low


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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    Columbia, MD
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    I dont like your sticker
    Yea. Should have ripped it off. Thats who has serviced it forever


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  11. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    Columbia, MD
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by ammoniadog View Post
    The only nit-pik I have is where the copper goes into the steel. If you would have changed the black reducing couplings to brass, it would have been a lot better.

    This has to do with electrolysis. I can't explain the whole science behind it, but when you connect copper and steel together it can cause the steel to rust out really fast and leak at that point. Using brass (or dialectic unions) between the copper and the steel will act as a buffer between the 2 metals to help prevent this.

    Oh wait, I have another nit-pik... It would be nice to see isolation valves on top of those zone valves and maybe unions to make changing them out easier.

    Other than that, it does look good. You did a nice job with the soldering. Also, the gauges on each side of the pump is a nice touch.
    So I understand the electrolysis. On closed loops that never get new water added, you wont have an issue.

    Where i have seen issues, is in city water, or systems that have lots if makeup water added.

    Thanks for the heads up.

    For the valves would be nice for shutoff. I made it super easy to purge it though.




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  12. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Northern NV
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    Electrolysis happens anytime there are dissimilar metals in an electrolyte, which in this case is the water in the system.

    Open systems suffer from corrosion in addition to electrolysis.

    Speed of destruction is dependent on the pH of the water in the system. Low pH=high amount of electrolysis. One possible reason to use an additive perhaps?

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